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GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS 

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APR 2 6 1967 

WILBUR CROSS LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT 



PUBLIC DOCUMENTS 



OF THE 



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LEGISLATURE OF CONNECTICUT, 



AT TH 



MAY SESSION, 1865. 



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H AHTFO RB 

1865. 




CONTENTS 



1. Governor's Message. 

2. ¥ Report of State Treasurer. 

3. " " Comptroller of Public Accounts. 

4. " " Commissioner of the School Fund. 

5. " M Trustees of the State Normal School. 

6. " " Superintendent of Common Schools. 

7. " " Trustees of State Reform School. 

8. " " Directors of the State Prison. 

9. " " Adjutant-General. 

10. ". " Quarter-Master-General. 

11. " " State Librarian on Registration of Births, 

Marriages and Deaths. 

12. " " Bank Commissioners. 

13. " " Railroad Commissioners. 

14. " " Abstract of Returns concerning Jails. 

15. " " Deaf and Dumb Asylum. 

16. " " Retreat for the Insane. 

17. " " Superintendent of School for Imbeciles. 

18. " " Hartford Hospital. 



MESSAGE 



OF HIS EXCELLENCY 



WILLIAM A. BUCKINGHAM, 



GOVERNOR OF CONNECTICUT, 



TO THE 



LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE, 

MAY SESSION, 1865. 



griuM foy <!)ffe of the 2C*gi0l0tor*. 



HARTFORD: 

A. N. CLARK & CO., STATE PRINTERS. 

1865. 



MESSAGE 



Mr. President, Mr. Speaker, and 

Gentlemen op the General Assembly : 

Convened by the voice of the people uttered through the 
forms of law, it is your duty as the legislative department of 
the State government to repeal, amend, and enact laws so as 
to protect the rights of your constituents, and to support 
and encourage the general government in exercising its 
power to preserve more extended interests now endangered 
by a protracted resistance to its authority. 

With profound gratitude we would recognize the good- 
ness of God in permitting us to see fresh evidence of the 
devotion of the people to constitutional liberty and national 
unity, as well as new proof of the strength and stability of 
our form of government. After four years of domestic vio- 
lence we are cheered with the prospect of restoring public 
tranquility, of staying the effusion of blood, and of holding 
before the friends of constitutional liberty, and before the 
monarchies and despotisms of the world a republic rescued 
from destruction in an hour of imminent peril by the united 
and energetic action of the American people, under the 
guidance of Divine Providence. 

The citizens of this commonwealth have taken no insignifi- 
cant part in this work. Many, with a just appreciation of 
the value of the rights and liberties committed to the guar- 
dianship of the nation, have at all times, and in all proper 
places, openly and fearlessly condemned as well the rebellion, 
as those who have apologized for or sympathized with it. 
They have also contributed liberally of their resources and 
their influence to support our national authorities. While 
yet others, inspired by a spirit of still greater and more self- 



sacrificing patriotism, have given their personal services and 
their lives for the preservation of the nation. 

Our legislators, partaking of the same spirit, and with the 
same object in view, conformed their action to the opinions 
and changed condition of the people. To meet expenditures 
made imperative by the rebellion, they have increased taxa- 
tion, and have made appropriations from the public treasury 
which leave a funded debt upon- the State of 88,000,000, and 
an unfunded one of $2,523,113.74. The amount to the 
credit of the sinking fund is §1,128,394.79. 

The payments during the year for ordinary expenses, as 
reported by the Comptroller, have been - ^417,818.30 
For soldiers' families, - - - 689,516.73 

Advances to the Paymaster-General for State 

bounties, and payments for other purposes 

connected with volunteers and the militia, 3,598,350.00 



Total, - $4,705,685.03 

As recruiting for the volunteer army has been stopped, the 
expenditures for the coming year will undoubtedly be mate- 
rially reduced. It will, however, be unwise to diminish tax-- 
ation, although the laws regulating its distribution may with 
propriety be reviewed. 

Another issue of State bonds is regarded as important, 
and if directed, it is suggested that the Treasurer be author- 
ized to dispose of them at prices not less than their par value, 
as he shall have opportunities, and as the necessities of his 
department may require. 

The account of the State against the general government 
has not yet been audited, and recently no progress has been 
made towards its settlement. A supplementary claim, 
amounting to $75,805.95, has lately been prepared, but not 
yet transmitted to the proper department. 

The amount of State indebtedness appears like a heavy 
burden when we feel that it has been imposed upon us by 
crime ; but when we consider that these expenditures have 
been incurred to conserve rights which we hold under the 
national government, and that they have successfully con- 



tributed to that object, the burden is removed and the nec- 
essary tax becomes a cheerful offering. The burden^ also 
appears light when compared with our ability to bear it. 

The valuation of real and personal property, according to 
the grand list for October last, is $254,627,407, being an in- 
crease of $17,477,243 during the preceding year. The total 
amount of State indebtedness is therefore less than four and 
one-quarter per cent, of the grand list, and less than two- 
thirds of its increased valuation in one year. 

The large amount of moneys received by the Commis- 
sioner of the School Fund in payment of loans, and the re- 
investment of the same in bonds and mortgages, have 
occupied the attention of that officer, who has been enabled 
to preserve the capital, amounting to a little over two mill- 
ions of dollars, unimpaired. 

The amount of revenue has been fully seven per cent, on 
the capital, from which the Commissioner has divided 
$132,048.75, to aid in the education of one hundred and 
fourteen thousand eight hundred and twenty-five children 
between the ages of four and sixteen years. 

The scrip for one hundred and eighty thousand acres of 
land received from the United States, has been sold for 
$135,000, and that sum invested in government bonds bear- 
ing five per cent, interest in gold. The avails of the interest 
in currency has been $13,233.05, which has been paid to the 
Treasurer of Yale College, to be used in accordance with 
the provisions of the Act of Congress making the grant. 

From the reports of the Superintendent of Common Schools 
and the Board of Trustees of the State Normal Schools, there 
is gratifying evidence that the cause of popular education is 
advancing, and that the school for training teachers is an 
important part of a complete and thorough system. 

The average attendance of scholars has been over seventy 
per cent, of the enumeration. 

A larger amount of money has been raised by districts for 
school purposes than ever before. There is more readiness 
to improve the condition of school buildings, and to make 



6 

the necessary preparation for the comfort of the scholars, 
and for their higher education. 

One hundred and thirty-nine pupils from sixty-eight towns, 
have attended the Normal School, and over one hundred 
from that institution have engaged in teaching during the 
past year. ' 

Teachers who have been thus thoroughly educated in the 
theory of instructing others, and who intend to make teach- 
ing a permanent occupation, are in greater deman'd than 
others, and command a higher remuneration for their ser- 
vices. 

There are two hundred and twenty-seven boys at the State 
Reform School, one hundred and forty one having been ad- 
mitted during the past year. The building is full, and the 
benefits of the school can not be extended to all proper sub- 
jects unless it shall be enlarged. 

The earnings of the boys in the school have been about 
$6,000. The institution is out of debt, and has never been 
more successful in effecting the design of its founders. The 
good already accomplished by reclaiming some who had 
entered the paths of vice, and by educating and fitting them 
to be useful citizens, should encourage and justify increased 
appropriations for the enlargement and support of the insti- 
tution. 

In the State Prison, discipline and good order have been 
secured among the 116 State convicts. The expense of 
maintaining the institution, over and above the earnings of 
the prisoners, has been 85,770.96. 

If the small number of convicts is the result of diminished 
crime, we may regard the incurring of expenses for their 
support as far better for the State than would be a larger 
income from an increased number of criminals. 

The income from the permanent funds of the American 
Asylum for the education of the Deaf and Dumb, was, prior 
to 1860, sufficient to pay one-half of the expenses of sup- 
porting the institution. But the cost of supplies has recently 
increased so much that the permanent funds have been im- 
paired, and the directors find it necessary to make an addi- 



tional charge for the support and instruction of beneficia- 
ries. 

This and our other humane institutions continue their be- 
nevolent and christian work in administering to the sick, in 
training the imbecile, in educating the deaf mute, in check- 
ing the paroxysms of the maniac, and in inspiring the minds 
of the desponding with hope. 

The management of these institutions should be under- 
stood by the public, and ample appropriations should be 
made to enable the directors to carry out the benevolent 
designs of the founders and patrons of these charitable estab- 
lishments. Such appropriations will not only benefit these 
unfortunate children of the State, but add comfort and joy 
to many of our households. 

The report of the State Librarian is of interest, having 
been prepared with great care, and exhibits the number of 
marriages, births and deaths within the State during the past 
ten years, as well as the causes of the deaths. Nine thou- 
sand seven hundred and thirty-four births, nine thousand 
one hundred and nine deaths, and: four thousand one hund- 
red and seven marriages, have taken place during the past 
year. 

The experience and accurate observations of the Librarian 
entitle his suggestions for securing a more perfect registra- 
tion, to consideration. 

The New Britain and Middletown Railroad Company have 
finished and are now operating their road. This is the only 
addition to the length of track which has been completed 
during the past year within the State. 

The several railroad companies have carried nearly a mill- 
ion more passengers than during any previous year. Their 
gross earnings have been unusually large, and their net 
earnings have increased more than twenty-five per cent. 
Injuries by the cars have been sustained by one hundred and 
seventeen persons, fifty-two of whom were either killed at 
the time of the accidents, or died soon after. 

For the previous ten or twelve years the death of a passen- 
ger while in his seat on our railroads has been rarely chron- 



8 

icled, and the recent occurrences may properly lead you to 
inquire whether measures can not be adopted which will in 
future prevent such a fearful loss of life. 

During the past year twenty-three banks, with an aggre- 
gate capital of 87,850,800, have changed from the State to 
the National system of doing business. 

There are now forty-nine State banks, with an aggregate 
capital, on the 1st of April, of 813,073,850, holding deposits 
amounting to 85,297,802.49, having 8852,792.96 in specie ; 
United States securities amounting to $6,881,417.63 ; a cir- 
culation of 87,305,024, and bills discounted amounting to 
116,278,001.21. 

The deposits in the forty-nine savings banks in the State 
increased during the year ending Dec. 31st, 1864, 82,160,- 
066.27, and amounted on that day to 829,142,288.58, being 
an average of about 8240 to each of the one hundred and 
twenty-one thousand six hundred and eighty-two depositors. 
An act to provide a national currency and to provide -for 
the redemption of the same, passed by the Congress of the 
United States, permits the assessment by State authority of 
taxes on stock in banks organized under its provisions, pro- 
vided that the same shall be paid at the place where the 
banks are located, and that the stock shall not be assessed at 
a greater rate than is assessed upon other monied capital in 
the hands of individual citizens of the State. 

Our laws provide for the taxation of bank and some other 
stocks at the places where the owners reside. As each town, 
borough and city determines the rate of taxation for munici- 
pal purposes independently of others, the rule of taxation is 
not and can not be uniform. 

These and other questions arising from a change in our 
system of banking, are of practical importance to the busi- 
ness public, and should be duly considered, for the purpose 
of making our laws harmonize with those of the federal gov- 
ernment, and for the purpose of placing upon stockholders 
in those banks an equitable share of public burdens. 

Tire last General Assembly proposed by resolution an 
amendment to the Constitution of the State, which, if 



9 

adopted, will give every male citizen of the United States 
resident in this State, of good moral character, and of suffi- 
cient education to read our statutes, the privilege of becom- 
ing an elector. 

In a republic the elective franchise may safely be granted 
to all virtuous and intelligent male citizens of proper age. 

We are now battling for the inalienable rights of man 
without regard to race or color. In this struggle the colored 
men, hitherto degraded and oppressed, have, in every section 
of the country, been on the side of the Government, and are 
now in our armies by thousands, fighting for freedom under 
the protection of law. 

Let us inspire the colored man with self-respect, and en- 
courage him to struggle and hope for a more elevated des- 
tiny, by granting him the boon so long withheld. 

The multiplicity of applications before our courts for di- 
vorces, the ease with which they are obtained, and the friv- 
olous grounds upon which the sacred relations of marriage 
are often sundered, are a scandal upon our reputation, and 
a reproach to our morals and our religion. Your attention 
is called to this subject, that you, as guardians of the public 
morals, may, if possible, arrest this tendency to disregard 
and violate the most solemn obligations. 

The necessities of Connecticut soldiers in "Washington for 
some temporary relief, the embarrassments which they and 
their many friends experience from the want of information, 
and the difficulties which discharged soldiers find in securing 
their pay, have led me to establish a permanent agency in 
that city, and to appoint Wm. A. Benedict, State Agent. 

Since his appointment he has not only been fully occupied, 
but has been unable to meet all the demands for assistance 
and information made upon his time by Connecticut soldiers. 

The several state agents have been engaged in visiting our 
soldiers in the camps and hospitals, and in securing the trans- 
fer of the sick and wounded to the hospitals in New Haven. 
They have rendered valuable service which could not have been 
secured as well by any other agency. 

The desire of sick and wounded soldiers to be near their 
2 



10 

families and their homes has been painfully manifest in the 
earnest applications which they have made to be transferred to 
the United States Hospital at New Haven. It has. however, 
been impossible to meet their wishes, for the want of room. 

During the past winter a number of highly respected and 
influential citizens of the state memorialized the 'executive to 
enlarge the hospital buildings. This has been done by the 
erection, at a cost of $10,597.25, of five pavilions, capable of 
accommodating five hundred soldiers. As no moneys have been 
by law appropriated for the payment of the expense incurred, 
none have been drawn from the public treasury, and your hon- 
orable body can now determine whether or not an appropria- 
tion shall be made for that object. Your decision upon this 
point should be based upon the importance of the object at- 
tained, and should be entirely independent of the fact that the 
expenditure has been made. 

Many discharged soldiers are entitled to bounty, pensions 
and back pay, and the wives of soldiers who are held as pris- 
oners in rebel hands, are also, by orders of the war depart- 
ment, entitled to draw a portion of the soldiers' pay during 
their imprisonment. 

Important evidence in support of claims for such dues is to 
be obtained from the records of the adjutant-general of the 
state. That officer has been ordered to furnish copies from 
his records for that purpose, to all persons who may make ap- 
plication for the same. 

The adjutant-general has also been directed to transmit to 
the war department, whenever requested by parties in interest. 
such proof, together with any other which may be furnished 
him, accompanied by an application for the amount due, and 
if successful in the collection, he is ordered to pay the full 
amount received to the soldier or to his family without charge. 

The laborious and responsible duties of the adjutant-general, 
quarter-master-general, and paymaster-general, have been per- 
formed to the satisfaction of this department, and I commend 
the reports of those officers to your careful examination. 

With an enrollment of forty-three thousand and fifty per- 
sons of an age which renders them subject to military duty, 



11 

only one thousand four hundred and eighty-five are members 
of the active militia and available for immediate service. Af- 
ter the trial of another year we have new evidence that a 
merely voluntary system is inadequate to secure a military 
force sufficient to meet the reasonable demands of the public 
at a season of disturbance and insubordination. Whether it 
is advisable to adopt more stringent measures to secure that 
object, you will be able to judge. 

The paymaster-general has paid sixty-two thousand nine 
hundred and seventy-five orders, and has disbursed $3,547,- 
917.66. This sum includes the payment of bounties to vol- 
unteers, and to persons who have furnished substitutes, the 
expenses of the militia, those of recruiting in rebel states, and 
office expenses, all of which appear in detail in his report here- 
with presented. 

Men who have enlisted into the regular army and into the 
veteran reserve corps are not entitled by law to the $30 per 
annum, nor are their families entitled to the monthly pay 
which has been provided for volunteers in state organizations, 
yet they feel that they have as strong claims to such payments 
as the persons who now receive them. 

Under the provisions of an act of Congress and of a law 
passed by the General Assembly of this state to provide for 
the payment of a bounty to volunteers, and for other purposes, 
approved July 9th, 1864, the Executive appointed agents to 
proceed to several of the military departments in the south, 
and recruit volunteers from states in rebellion to be credited 
to the quota of this state. The agents were allowed a com- 
pensation of $100 for the expense of obtaining each volunteer. 

The paymaster-general was ordered to appoint an assistant 
paymaster to proceed to each of the departments referred to 
with funds to pay the state bounties at the time when the vol- 
unteers should be mustered into the service. 

The obstacles in the way of obtaining the musters of men 
in Mississippi were so great that the agent appointed for that 
department failed of securing volunteers, and under the law 
was not entitled to pay either for his time or his expenses. 
There is no doubt of his fidelity or ability, and a claim for re- 



12 

numeration may be regarded with favor. Other agents were 
successful, and eleven hundred and forty-four volunteers were 
obtained. 

The war department authorized persons liable to draft to 
procure substitutes from states in rebellion, provided the sub- 
stitutes should be sent to the districts in which the principals 
were enrolled without expense to the government. An agent 
was appointed from each county to procure substitutes, but 
not one of them was successful. All recruiting agents have 
been relieved from duty and discharged. 

Orders relating to this subject, as well as others issued by 
the commander-in-chief to regulate and facilitate volunteering 
for our armies, will appear in the report of the adjutant-gen- 
eral. 

To aid the National Government in suppressing the formi- 
dable and extended rebellion against its rightful authority, 
Connecticut has furnished one regiment and one squadron of 
cavalry, three batteries of artillery, twenty-nine regiments 
and four companies of infantry and artillery, more than two 
thousand volunteers for the navy, and recruits to fill up the 
often decimated ranks of the above organizations, and for the 
regular army, in such numbers that by the records of the 
Adjutant-General it appears that on the 31st of March last, 
the State had been credited by the War Department upon the 
quotas assigned under all calls of the President for troops, 
with fifty-four thousand four hundred and sixty-eight men, 
who have been mustered for a total service of one hundred 
and thirty-two thousand seven hundred and sixteen years. 

The Adjutant-General reports a surplus of men furnished 
by the State, of six thousand and eighty-nine, for three years 
service, without reference to our quota under the call of De- 
cember last. That quota has not yet been assigned, but the 
Provost Marshal General reports a surplus of one thousand 
two hundred and eleven men, and three thousand five hun- 
dred and sixty-four years of service standing to the credit of 
the State over the number of men and years of service re- 
quired on all calls hitherto made. 

Two thousand seven hundred and eighty-five colored sol- 



13 

diers are included in the number of Connecticut Volunteers 
as given above. The Twenty-ninth Connecticut, composed 
of colored men, was the first regiment of infantry to enter the 
rebel capital when the leading traitor and his army were 
forced to evacuate it. 

It is a gratifying proof of the support which this State has 
rendered to the military power of the Government, that in the 
last order issued by the War Department for a draft to fill 
the armies, Connecticut was excepted from its operation, 
while every other State east of the Mississippi, except one, 
was called upon to furnish more troops. 

It is equally gratifying that our volunteers from the gallant 
Major-General who distinguished himself by storming and 
capturing Fort Fisher, down through the various grades of 
heroic officers to the less conspicuous but equally merito- 
rious privates, have not been surpassed by any soldiers in 
the service of any government, in patient endurance in the 
field and hospital, in fortitude under imprisonment and 
starvation, and in valor and intrepidity in battle. Their 
record furnishes strong evidence that they entered the service 
under a deep conviction that it was a duty they owed to their 
country, to humanity, and to God. 

The military service which has been thus rendered, to- 
gether with all the cost of moneys, and the loss of life which 
have resulted from the rebellion, have been made necessary 
by the persistent and unscrupulous efforts of certain States 
to maintain and extend an institution inimical to the general 
inter es'ts. 

At the time the Union was formed, the people were jealous 
of centralized powers, and fearing that they would be used to 
oppress citizens in the republic, as they had been in the mon- 
archies and despotisms of the old world, declared that all 
powers not delegated to the United States, were reserved to 
the States or to the people. 

They however perceived that in the future advancement 
and enlargement of the nation, it might become important 
for the general welfare and safety, to place subjects not then 
defined, under national control, and they wisely made provis- 



14 

ion by which the constitution might be altered to meet ne- 
cessities made apparent by progress and experience. 

The question of exercising this right in its application to 
the proximate cause of the rebellion, is now submitted for 
your action by a resolution adopted by Congress to amend 
the Constitution of the United States. The resolution is 
herewith presented. If adopted by three-fourths of the 
States, it takes from the States the reserved right to main- 
tain a system of domestic slavery, and transfers all questions 
which relate to that institution to the sovereign control of 
the nation. 

Slavery is a local institution, and is protected by State au- 
thority. , Yet its influence has been felt in every section of 
our widely extended country. It has given character to na- 
tional legislation and direction to national policy. It sowed 
the seeds of sectional jealousy and hostility, which have 
sprung up and brought forth the bitter fruits of public vio- 
lence and crime. An institution so extended in its influence, 
and so powerful to effect the peace and the destiny of this 
nation, can not be governed so as to promote the general 
welfare by local authority, and should be brought under the 
sovereign power of a government established to promote the 
interests and preserve the liberties of the whole people. 

It would be highly creditable to the intelligence and patri- 
otism of your constituents, and add a noble record to our 
history, if the proposed amendment to the Constitution 
should be adopted by your honorable body without a dissent- 
ing voice. 

The rebellion has led us to see more clearly than before, 
the distinction between state rights and national sovereignty. 
State rights are the centrifugal forces of the government 
which tend to disintegration. National sovereignty embraces 
the centripetal forces which tend to centralization and des- 
potism. Both are inherent in, and essential to, our complex 
system of government ; but they should be held in just equi- 
librium, and act in harmony, in order to secure the highest 
benefit. 

The States are integral parts of the nation. They have 



15 

rights, but not the right of separation from the Union. They 
have authority, and can exercise sovereignty over questions 
which effect interests lying wholly within their jurisdiction 
and territorial limits, but over and above, covering and ab- 
sorbing that authority, rises the inherent sovereignty of the 
nation, which controls every subject in which citizens of the 
several States have a common interest. 

But those who sat at the feet of that eminent sophist, John 
C. Calhoun, received his expositions of the doctrine of State 
Rights, as meaning sovereignty over subjects outside of and 
beyond the reach and control of the States. This poison, so 
delicious to their taste, they drank freely, until it pervaded 
the head and the heart, developed itself on almost every pub- 
lic occasion, and finally produced a criminal rebellion to se- 
cure State independence through national disintegration. 

The old confederacy could not give equal protection, nor 
distribute public burdens equally. Its laws were merely ad- 
visory, not authoritative. It failed to become a nation be- 
cause the States refused to relinquish to it their sovereignty, 
— an essential element of nationality. The rebellion fur- 
nishes additional proof of the inadequacy of a mere confede- 
* racy of States to perform all the functions of a government. 
Our enemies, who have been most clamorous in support of 
the doctrine of State Sovereignty now declare that it has been 
the weakness of their cause, has impaired confederate author- 
ity, and has been employed to subvert all measures designed 
for the common defense and general welfare. 

This must ever be the result of an attempt to put into 
practice the theory that a State can properly determine 
whether or not her citizens shall be responsible to, and obey 
the laws of, the general government. 

The right of States to impede the execution of national 
laws, the demands of slavery for extension, and the claims of 
a minority to dictate terms upon which they will live in har- 
mony with the majority, are questions which should have 
been determined by the established courts of law and equity. 
But instead of this, they have been pressed to the arbitrament 
of the sword. 



16 

After years of war these questions are still unadjusted, and 
through the inability of one of the parties to continue the con- 
test, are about to be withdrawn from that tribunal and sub- 
mitted to the people. Here the conflict may be prosecuted 
with earnestness, vigor, and even with bitterness ; but it will 
be bloodless. It will, however, be found that the terrible 
sufferings caused by the sword have given freemen a more 
clear understanding of the foundations upon which republican 
liberty must rest, and have prepared the public to submit to 
a verdict rendered at the ballot box. If the decision shall be 
made with reference to the claims of right and universal jus- 
tice, we may hope for enduring peace. But if for the sake of 
securing immediate relief, or of conciliating public enemies, 
we silence the conscience of the nation, fetter liberty, and 
attempt to stop the progress of civilization and religion, we 
may expect that the life of the nation will be again jeopardized, 
and deliverance come only by another bitter, and more bloody 
revolution. 

We can see clearly that this nation has not been led by the 
will of man, or controlled by the wisdom of counselors ; but, 
by events which, under God, are working out His designs for 
the benefit of freedom and humanity. 

Our enemies, who plotted treason, and conspired to- over- 
throw our government, based their hopes of accomplishing 
their purpose upon our inability and unwillingness to defend 
our rights by the sword ; but the mustering of more than two 
millions of volunteers for the battle-field has proved the ground- 
lessness' of their hopes. They thought we were cowards, but 
Lookout Mountain, the Wilderness, and Fort Fisher, have 
dissipated that delusion. They trusted in their strongholds 
for defense, but they have been compelled to surrender 
Vicksburg, Charleston and Richmond. They expected the 
co-operation of foreign governments, but our manifest deter- 
mination to protect our rights against all combinations, has 
admonished those powers of the hazard attending an interfer- 
ence in our domestic difficulties, and the anticipated assistance 
has not been realized. 

In the clamor of a portion of the people for peace, our 



17 

enemies thought they saw a divided North and a crippled gov- 
ernment; but the re-election of Abraham Lincoln to the pres- 
idency, gave assurance that we would have peace only by 
securing submission to rightful authority. 

In their extremity, when courage and strength failed, when 
there was no Cassias to help their sinking cause, they pre- 
sumed upon the personal kindness of a president whom they 
had scorned and maligned, and trusted that by his clemency 
they would be pardoned, and by his magnanimity restored to 
their former positions of influence and power. But at that 
hour, plans set on foot by their hellish designs, and nourished 
by years of malignity, matured and brought forth their legiti- 
mate fruits; and the last hopes of this rebellion were buried 
in the grave of an assassinated president. 

Thus events are teaching us that "they that take the sword 
shall perish with the sword ;" " they have sown the wind, and 
they shall reap the whirlwind." 

At a period of unsurpassed embarrassment and danger to 
our nation, Abraham Lincoln was called a second time to the 
highest earthly position of honor and responsibility, from 
which he has been struck down by the hand of violence and 
treason. The deed has filled 'the world with astonishment, 
horror, and righteous indignation. The shock has been great, 
because of the greatness of the crime, and of the high charac- 
ter and position of the man. The President's patriotism was 
disinterested, and his honesty undoubted. He fell a martyr 
to his fidelity to truth, to duty, and to the interests of 
humanity. 

In the affections of an oppressed race "he was higher than 
any of the people from his shoulders and upward." They 
"trusted it had been he which should have redeemed" them 
from oppression. 

A great, a wise, and a good ruler is dead ; and every loyal 
heart is filled with sorrow and grief; but the nation lives, and 
calls still more imperatively for the performance of duties 
pressed upon our attention by the occurrences of the hour. 

The forced surrender of the armies of the rebellion to the 
union forces indicates the end of battles, the restoration of 
3 



18 

peace without the consent of our enemies, and the supremacy 
of the government. 

The reduction of expenses will necessarily follow, but it will 
be our duty to suppress and overwhelm any attempt to stain 
or impair the national credit, or national probity ; as well as 
to meet the pecuniary responsibilities already incurred, with 
confidence in a prosperous future. 

Nor should we forget the heavy responsibilities placed upon 
him who, by a permissive providence, has been called to ad- 
minister the government. In a life devoted to public service 
he proves his disinterested patriotism, his firmness, his fear- 
less independence, his opposition to slavery, and his hatred 
of treason. Let us give him our confidence and our gener- 
ous support. 

As slavery has been the cause of our woes and our bur- 
dens, it is our duty to labor for its abolition. An institution 
antagonistic to liberty, opposed to the first elements of Chris- 
tianity, which, in its barbarous tendency, planned and perpe- 
trated a cowardly, brutal, and murderous assault upon free- 
dom of speech, and upon fidelity to truth, and to the de- 
mands of justice, in the person of a scholarly and accom- 
plished statesman in the American Senate — an institution 
which instigated the rebellion — which seized and imprisoned 
our sons, and sent them by tens of thousands down to the 
grave, by starvation, — and which, to crown its work of infa- 
my, assassinated the President, — has forfeited all right to 
protection and life, and merits our vigorous and undying 
opposition. 

The disposition recently manifested by a portion of our 
fellow-citizens to exercise clemency towards the chief actors 
in these revolting scenes is a cause of serious alarm. 

At the time of the occupation of Richmond by the Union 
armies, and of the defeat and capture of the insurgents 
under Lee, this inclination extended itself for a time with a 
rapidity and power which threatened to disregard the claims 
of justice, and which made that period one of greater peril 
to our liberties than any since the commencement of the 
rebellion. 



19 

Leniency, without a distinction between loyalty and treason, 
is more certain to subvert the government than is rebellion 
itself. 

Clemency, at the sacrifice of justice, is the abandonment 
of government. 

The treason of the hour is a crime against law, and liberty. 
They who are guilty of it have forfeited all rights to citizen- 
ship and all claims to governmental protection. 

Every field of carnage, every rebel prison, every soldier's 
grave, and the blood of the martyred President, unite with a 
violated law and demand the penalty. 

Let it be inflicted, beginning with the leaders in crime, 
and let it be followed up with a firm hand, until the inno- 
cent and the loyal shall be conscious of security under the 
vindicated majesty of the law. 

Then, and not until then, may we safely restore forfeited 
rights and extend forgiveness with a beneficent prodigality. 

If, during- this struggle, we shall sustain the general gov- 
ernment in the performance of its proper functions, abolish 
the inhuman system of slavery, punish traitors, and adhere 
perpetually to the demands of truth, righteousness and jus- 
tice, we may hope that throughout an undivided nation our 
prosperity will be increased, our peace be uninterrupted, and 
our liberties be eternal. 

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM. 
Hartford, May 3, 1865. 



v 



REP OUT 



OP THE 



STATE TREASURER, 



TO THE 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 



MAT SESSION, 1865. 



frmto \q ©rtor nf t\t Opiate, 



NEW HAVEN: 
CARRINGTON & HOTCHKISS, STATE PRINTERS. 

1865. 



Treasurer's Office, ) 
Hartford, May Session, 1865. f 

To the Hon. Speaker of the House of Representatives : 

Sir, — I herewith transmit my report for the fiscal year end- 
ing March 1st, 1S65, that it may be submitted to the General 
Assembly. 

Yery Respectfully, 

GABRIEL W. COITE, . 

State Treasurer. 



KEPOKT. 



State of Connecticut, ) 

Treasurer's Office, Hartford, April, 1865. j 

To the Honorable General Assembly : 

I submit herewith a statement of the financial transactions 
of this department; also an exhibit of the several funds and 
accounts of the State Treasury, during the fiscal year ending 
March 31st, 1865. 

The balance of cash on hand, April 1, 1864, . 

was ' . . . $ 49,774.04 

The receipts of public revenue, including 

balance of bills payable, were . . . 5,017,992.15 



$5,067,766.19 



Deduct payment on Comptrol- 
ler's Orders, ... $4,705,655.03 

Deduct payment for interest on 

State Bonds, . . . 358,653.00 5,064,308.03 



Balance to the credit of the Civil List, . . $3,428.16 



Total receipts from all sources during the year, $11,006,565.84 
Add balance from all accounts, April 1, 1864, 108,190.93 



$11,114,756.77 
Deduct payments for all purposes, . . . 10,988,361.96 



Balance, $1^6,394.81 



Leaving a balance in the Treasury, April 1, 1865, to the 
credit of the several accounts of Civil List, School Fund and 
State Institutions, amounting to one hundred and twenty-six 
thousand three hundred and ninety-four dollars aud eighty one 
cents. 

STATE DEBT. 

The funded debt of the State is eight millions of dollars, 
and consists of four series or issues of State Bonds, of two 
millions each. The last two millions having been issued since 
the date of my last report, at various rates of premium, net- 
ting in the aggregate the sum of $8,598.38, at an expense of 
$1,838.39, incurred by advertising and the engraving of a new 
plate, and the printing of blank bonds. 

The floating or temporary debt, on the first of April, was 
$2,523,113.79, consisting of loans from Savings Banks, paya- 
ble on demand, and from other banks, payable between now 
and the early part of July next. It will therefore be neces- 
sary for the General Assembly to provide means for the ex- 
tinguishment of a large portion of the above amount of tem- 
porary debt, at the earliest period practicable. 

SINKING FUND. 

The Sinking Funds, established for the redemption of four 
millions of the funded debt of the State, now amounts to 
$1,131,860.25, of which, $716,500 is invested in United States 
six per cent., (rive-twenties,) and $331,500 in the ten-forty, or 
five per cent. Government Bonds. The balance is loaned tem- 
porarily to the State. I now propose to invest the whole 
amount in Connecticut State Bonds, if authorized to make a 
new issue. 

I also suggest that the Treasurer be authorized to sell the 
United States Stocks at their present enhanced value, and to 
replace them by Bonds of the State, to the amount of the pro- 
ceeds. This course will give the Treasury a large proportion 
of the amount of cash required to liquidate the temporary 



loan, and make a place for more than a million of dollars in 
State Bonds of a new issue. 

An attempt at present to dispose of a large amount of State 
Bonds may not be successful, as surplus moneys are freely 
placed in Government Securities, bearing a much more remu- 
nerative rate of interest than the State has paid. Any course 
taken to increase the rate will tend to depreciate the bonds al- 
ready issued, and thereby prejudice the interests of holders 
who have liberally contributed pecuniary aid at times when it 
was so essentially requisite. 

In this connection, I desire to observe that the value of a 
contemplated issue of State Bonds would be materially en- 
hanced by making them free from taxation, under the laws of 
the State, and by authorizing the Treasurer to provide for the 
payment of the coupons in the cities of Hartford and New 
York. 

The revenue derived from existing laws, will, if the amount 
received be as large as during the past year, be sufficient to 
pay the interest on the public debt and Civil List expenses, 
and leave nearly sufficient amount to meet all unusual de- 
mands upon the Treasury. 

SAYINGS BANKS. 

Since my last report, a decision has been obtained from the 
United States Supreme Court, which exempts all money cor- 
porations from State taxation upon the United States securities 
held by them. If this decision applies to our Savings Banks, 
a large proportion of their deposits will be removed beyond 
the reach of our local tax laws. 

Several of the Banks have recently paid a portion of the 
State tax due by them for the years 1863 and '64, in the just 
expectation that if the decision of the U. S. Court proved fa- 
vorable to their claims, the money so paid would be refunded 
by the State. The amount of tax thus paid is about $20,000. 
The General Assembly will probably decide as to the equity 
of their claim for reimbursement of the tax thus paid by 
them. 



NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATIONS. 

The gradual conversion of the State Banks into National 
Banking Associations, will soon remove the entire capital 
beyond the pale of State taxation, thereby causing a large de- 
ficiency in the revenue of the State hitherto derived from that 
source. 

One of the Banks, in which the State is a stockholder to a 
very large amount, assumed the right to prohibit the State 
from associating with them under their new organization, and 
requested the Treasurer of the State to surrender the stock 
certificates held by him at their par value, thereby excluding 
the State from any participation in the accrued profits held by 
the Bank. 

As the State holds for the Civil List and for the School Fund 
$806,000 of State Bank Stocks, I deemed it to be my duty to 
place those interests under the professional care of the State At- 
torney, and he has taken the measures necessary for the pur- 
pose of protecting the same. 



CORPORATIONS AND ASSOCIATIONS. 

After much labor and delay, I procured statements from 257 
manufacturing corporations within the State, of which number 
237 have paid the tax of one-quarter of one per cent., amount- 
ing to $57,743.29 ; the remaining twenty (from which a tax of 
§8,816 is due) decline to make the payment. 

The managers of some of the above corporations claim that, 
having already placed their property in the towns in which 
they are situated, and paid taxes thereon, they should not be 
required to pay what has been termed " a double tax." They 
also claim that under the phraseology of the law which refers 
to those " whose stock is liable to taxation in this State, they 
should not be called upon, asserting that the law does not re- 
fer to the institutions in which they are interested. Very 



many corporations have paid no attention to the law — proba- 
bly not being aware of its existence. 

I have not caused suits to be commenced against all delin- 
quent corporations, because it would have appeared vexatious 
and litigious; and it certainly would have been unjust to sub- 
ject any one to the expense of a suit, while the others quietly 
awaited the result, without bearing any portion of either costs 
and expenses. I therefore thought proper to refer the entire 
subject to the General Assembly. 



TELEGKAPH COMPANIES. 

The American Telegraph Company have been notified of the 
existence of the law requiring them to make a return to the 
State Comptroller, and pay a tax to the State Treasurer. They 
have promised the necessary return, but none has as yet been 
received, nor has any tax been paid. 



MILITAKY COMMUTATION TAX. 

There is a want of clearness in the law fixing the amount 
of Military Commutation tax, to be collected and paid for the 
years 1863 and 1864. Several of the Town Boards have 
claimed that they were required to pay only one dollar, per 
capita, on the law of 1864. I was advised that it was my du- 
ty to collect two dollars, the amount named in that law, which 
amount has been paid by all the Towns except one. 

I submit the subject to the General Assembly, and if it 
should appear that one dollar, per capita, in excess has been 
collected, I suggest that a law be passed authorizing a deduc- 
tion of that amount from the tax next to be collected and paid 
into the State Treasury. 



8 



COMPENSATION OF CLERK. 

The present rate of compensation to the Clerk in the Treas- 
ury Office, was fixed at a time when the service rendered was 
not one-tenth of that now required by the vast increase of 
public business. I suggest, therefore, that it would be more 
equitable and desirable to raise the compensation to a specific 
amount, than to make an appropriation for " extra services" at 
the heel of a Session, when for want of time the just claims of 
a competent public servant may not have been fully consid- 
ered. 

TRUST FUNDS. 

In addition to the large amount of Cash Securities invested 
in the Sinking Funds, the Treasurer is the custodian of 
$600,000 of United States and State Bonds, belonging to vari- 
ous Insurance Companies of this State, deposited in conformity 
with the provisions of a law of the State. 

This additional trust adds much to the labor and responsi- 
bility of the State Treasurer, for which no compensation is re- 
ceived by him, none having been provided for by law. I 
therefore inquire whether it be not just, either to compensate 
that officer for the additional burdens thus imposed upon him, 
not for State purposes, but for the benefit of individual corpo- 
rations, or relieve him from the responsibility of their safe 
keeping. 

The annexed tables, statements and accounts exhibit the de- 
tails of the receipts and disbursements of the State Treasury 
during the past fiscal year. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

GABRIEL W. COITE, Treasurer. 



GENERAL REVENUE. 
TAX FROM TOWNS. PAYABLE FEBRUARY 20. 



1865. 









Military Com- 


'Taxes due end- 


TOWNS. 


Grand List. 


Tax at 4 mills. 


mutation Tax 
at $2. 


ing March 31, 
1SG5. 


Hartford, - - - - 


$30,041,829 


$120,167.32 


$2,112.00 




Avon, - 


515.702 


2,063.17 


170.00 




Berlin, - 


995,258 


3,981.03 


480.00 




Bloomficld, 


832,883 


3,331.53 


230.00 




Bristol, - 


l,4G7,80ti 


5,871.22 


424.00 




Burlington, 


450.739 


1,802,96 


70.00 




Canton, 


1,113,902 


4,45561 


430.00 




East Granbv, - 


493,V89 


1,975.96 


114.00 




East Hartford, 


1,347,425 


6 389.70 


430.00 




East Windsor, - 


1,157,745 


4,630.98 


382.00 




Enfield,- - 


2.738,914 


10,955.66 


332.00 




Farmington, - 


2,090,765 


8,363.06 


298.00 




Glastenbury, - 


1,303,004 


5,212.02 


660.00 




Granby, - 


594,317 


2,377.27 


328.00 




Hartland, - 


364,293 


1,457.17 


180.00 




Manchester, 


1,476,178 


5,904.71 


578.00 




Marlborough, - 


302,125 


1,208.5C 


74.00 




New Britain, - 


2,490,024 


9,960.10 


584.00 




Rocky Hill, - - - - 


491,892 


1,957.57 


192 00 




Simsbury, - 


1,067.491 


4,269.96 


320.00 




Southington, - 


1,432,442 


5,729.77 


440.00 




South Windsor, - 


1,142,22? 


4,568.91 


320.00 




Suffield,- - 


1,699,944 


6.799.78 


306.00 




West Hartford, - 


1,173,263 


4,693.05 


244.00 




Wethersb'eld, 


1,686,656 


6,746.62 


140.00 




Windsor, - 


1,408,448 


5,633.79 


488.00 




Windsor Locks, 


598,110 


2,392.44 


252.00 






§60,477,461 


$241,909.86 


$10,578.00 




New Haven, 


27,427,928 


109,711.71 


2,856.00 




Bran ford, - 


1,032,049 


4,128.20 


206.00 




Bethany, - 


529,641 


2,118.56 


108.00 




Cheshire, - 


1,158,301 


4,633.20 


192.00 




Derby, .... 


2,797,733 


11,190.93 


344.00 




East Haven, - 


1,386,903 


5,547.61 


500.00 


297.00 


Guilford, - 


1,449,200 


5,796.80 


416.00 




Haniden, - 


1,440,000 


5,760.00 


588.00 




Madison, - - - - 


872.716 


3,490.86 


168.00 




Meriden, - 


3,712,537 


14,850.15 


1,506.00 


*16,356.15 


Middl*>bury, - 


352,617 


1,410.47 


48.00 




Milford, - 


1,015,642 


4,062.57 


298.00 




Naugatuck, ... 


1,158,714 


4,634.86 


380.00 




North Branford, - 


539,816 


2,159.26 


150.00 




Nortli Haven, 


661,135 


2.644.54 


278.00 




Orange ----- 


992,672 


3,970.69 


396.00 




Oxford, - 


622,124 


2,483.50 


150.00 




Prospect, • 


213,310 


853.24 


54.00 




Seymour, - 


7S0.146 


3,120.58 


320.00 




Southbury, - 


851,789 


3,407.16 


234.00 




Wallingford, - 


1,723.820 


6,895.28 


640.00 




Waterbury, - 


5,971,450 


23,885.80 


630.00 




Woodbridge, - 


463,395 


1.853.58 


106.00 




Wolcott, - - - - 


293,479 


1.173.92 


90.00 






$57,447,117 


$229,788.47 


$10,658.00, 


$16,653.15 



Paid in April, 1S65. 



10 



GENERAL REVENUE. 
TAX FROM TOWNS, PAYABLE FEBRUARY 20, 1865. 









Military Com- 


Taxes due end- 


TOWNS. 


Grand List. 


Tax at 4 mills. 


mutation Tax 
at $2. 


in-,' March 31, 
1S65. 


New London, 


$5,139,055 


$20,556.22 


$1,124.00 




Norwich, - 


9,819,565 


39,278.26 


894.00 




Bozrnh, - 


499,923 


1,999.69 


60.00 




Colchester, - 


1,528,366 


6,113.46 


406.00 




East Lyme, . - - - 


557,330 


2,229.32 


140.00 




Franklin, - 


459,906 


1,839.62 


112.00 




Griswolti, - 


998.278 


3,993.11 


200.00 




Groton, - 


2,390,945 


9,563.78 


344.00 




Lebanon, - 


1,121,096 


4,481, H8 


268.00 




Ledyard, - 


605,635 


2,422.54 


270.00 




Lisbon, - 


309,288 


1,237.15 


86.00 




Lyme, - 


399.684 


1,598.74 


230.00 




Montville, - 


1,074,657 


4,298.63 


296.00 




North Stonington, 


873,650 


3,494.60 


318.00 




Old Lyme, - 


533,843 


2,135.37 


84.00 




Preston, --'•-'- 


824,003 


3,296.01 


232.00 




Salem, - 


376,885 


1,507.54 


70.00 




Spraguc, - 


1,104 854 


4,419.42 


164.00 




Stonington, - 


4,2^8,084 


17,192.34 


280.00 




Waterford, 


940,393 


3,761.57 


482.00 






$33,855,440 


$135,421.75 


$6,050.00 




Bridgeport, - 


7,314,873 


29.259.49 


2,992.00 




Danburv, - 


3,980,254 


15,921.02 


1,740.00 




Bethel,' 


645,018 


2,580.07 


150.00 




Brookfield, 


708.254 


2,833.02 


154.00 




Darien, - 


1,122,261 


4,489.04 


314.00 




Easton, - 


638,638 


2,554.55 


60.00 




Fairfield, - 


3,331,538 


. 13326.15 


630.00 




Greenwich, 


3,143,047 


12.572.19 


616.00 




Huntington, 


713.550 


2,854.20 


78.00 




Monroe, - 


624,515 


2,498.06 


182.00 




New Canaan, 


1,145,541 


4,582.16 


254.00 




New Fail-field, - 


448,282 


1,793.13 


214.00 




Newtown, - 


1,827,711 


7,310.84 


440.00 




Nor walk, - 


4,424,473 


17,697.89 


1,034.00 




Redding, - 


1,187,144 


4,748.58 


284 00 




RidgefielJ, - 


1,252.765 


6,011.06 


300.00 


i 


Stamford, - 


4.636,785 


18.547.14 


708.00 




Sherman, - 


429,742 


1.7 is. '.'7 


72.00 




Stratford, - 


1,622,863 


6,491.45 


204.00 




Trumbull, - 


735,244 


2,940.98 


100.00 




Weston, - 


60S.409 


2,033.64 


204.00 




Westport, 


2,088,246 


8,352.98 


442.00 




Wilton, 


76)3,665 


3,054.66 


280.00 






$43,292,818 


$173,171.27 


811,452.00 





11 



GENERAL REVENUE. 
TAX FROM TOWNS, PAYABLE FEBRUARY 20, 1865. 









Military Com- Taxes due end- 


TOWNS. 


Grand List. 


Tax at 4 mills. 


mutation Tax 
at $2. 


ing March 31, 
1865. 


BnOOKLYN, - 


§1,030,838 


$4,121.35 


$252.00 




Ashford, • 


515,345 


2,061.38 


102.00 




Canterbury, - 


716,476 


2.865 90 


160.00 




Chaplin, - 


289,903 


1,159.61 


44.00 




Eastford, .... 


320,554 


1,282.21 


214.00 




Hampton, - 


430,630 


1,722.52 


148.00 




Kiliint^ly, .... 


1,618,287 


6,473.15 


788.00 




Plainfield, - 


1,510,222 


6,040.89 


320.00 




Pom fret, - 


1,017,322 


4,069.29 


172.00 




Putnam, - 


985,844 


3,943.38 


318.00 




Scotland, - 


388,712 


1.554.85 


72.00 




Sterling, - 


378,974 


1 515.90 


162.00 




Thompson, - - - 


1,731,443 


6.925.77 


328.00 




Voluntown, ... 


291,760 


1,167.04 


98.00 




Windham, - 


1,792,550 


7,170.20 


480.00 




Woodstock, - 


1,342 723 


5,370.89 


480.00 






$14,361,083 


$57,444.33 


$4,138.00 




Litchfield, - 


1,664,180 


6,656.72 


522.00 




Barkliarnsted, - 


514,204 


2,056 82 


240.00 




Bethlehem, - 


527,769 


2,111.08 


148.00 




Bridgewater, 


558,561 


2,234.24 


134.00 




Canaan, - 


718,089 


2,872.36 


140.00 




Cole brook, 


622,738 


2,490.95 


230.00 




Cornwall, - 


795,670 


3,182.68 


266.00 




Goshen, - 


900,529 


3,602.11 


238.00 




Harwinton, - 


613,934 


2,455.73 


148.00 




Kent, .... 


628,590 


2,514,36 


292.00 




Morris, - 


417,375 


1,669.50 


116.00 




New Hartford, - 


1,005,191 


4,020.76 


174.G0 




New MLIford, 


2,030,446 


8,121.78 


632.00 




Norfolk, .... 


851,893 


3,407.57 


228.00 




North Canaan, - - e - 


783,3-26 


3,133.30 


174.00 




Plymouth, . - . 


1,722,572 


6,890.29 


744.00 




Roxbury, - 


495,607 


1,982.43 


162.00 




Salisbury, 


1,869,476 


7,477.90 


306.00 




Sharon, - 


1,400,290 


5,601 16 


392.00 




Torrington, ... 


1,110,639 


4,442.56 


166.00 




Warren, - 


350,257 


1,401.03 


152.00 




Washington, 


1,002.478 


4,009.91 


268.00 




Watertown, - 


1,314,400 


5,257.60 


250.00 




Winchester, 


1,995,305 


7,9S1.2 l 2 


710.00 




Woodbury, 


1,170,292 


4,681 17 


388.00 






$25,063,811 


$100,255.23 


$7,220.00 





12 



GENERAL REVENUE. 
TAX FROM TOWNS, PAYABLE FEBRUARY 20, 1865. 









Military Com- 


Taxes due end- 


TOWNS. 


Grand List. 


Tax at 4 mills. 


mutation Tax 


inp March 81, 






$19,649.72 


at $2. 


1SG5. 


Middle-town, 


$4,912,431 


$1,274.00 


$172.26 


Haddam, - 


877,278 


3,509.11 


17800 




Chatham, - 


859,615 


3,438.46 


182.00 


502.46 


Cheater, .... 


384.500 


1,538.00 


138.00 




Clinton, - 


612,323 


2,449.29 


124 00 




Cromwell, - 


676,1*0 


2,304.52 


174.00 




Durham, - 


533,017 


2,132.07 


184.00 




East Haddam, - 


1,228,642 


4,914.57 


500.00 




Essex, 


912.866 


3,651.46 


212.00 




Killingworth, ... 


345.828 


1,.S83.31 


122.00 




Old Say brook, 


599,484 


2 397.94 


228.00 




Portland, - 


1,792,917 


7,171.67 


640.00 




Saybrook, • 


586.619 


2,346.48 


102.00 




Weatbrook, - 


518,018 


2,072.07 


250.00 






$14,739,668 


$58,958.67 


$4,208.00 


$674.72 


Tolland, - 


524,785 


2,099.14 


140.00 




Aodover, - . - - 


277,853 


1,111.41 


70.00 




Bolton, 


291,873 


1,167.49 


100.00 




Coventry, - - - - 


843,211 


3,372 84 


360.00 




Columbia, - 


346,714 


1,386.86 


140.00 




Ellington, - . - - 


788,376 


8, 153.50 


1^200 




Hebron, - 


642,245 


2,568.98 


138.00 




Mansfield, - 


738.739 


2,954.96 


382.00 




Somers, - 


778,120 


3,112.48 


188 00 




Stafford, -.-. 


1,278.583 


5,114.33 


540.00 




Union, 


297,693 


1,190.77 


170.00 




Vernon, .... 


1,800,397 


7,201.59 


748.00 




Wellington, - 


377,422 


1,509.69 


240.00 






$8,986,011 


$35,944.04 


$3,408.00 





13 



SUMMARY. 



COUNTIES. 


Grand List. 


Tax at 4 mills. 


Military Com- 
mutation Tax 


Taxes unpaid 
year ending 


Military sub- 








at $2. 


March 31,1865. 




Hartford, 


$60,477,-161 


$241,909.S6 


$10,578.00 




5,289 


New Haven, 


57,447,117 


229,788.47 


10,658.1,0 


$16,653.15 


5.329 


New London, 


33,855,440 


135,421.75 


6,050 00 




3,025 


Fairfield, 


43,292,818 


173,171.27 


11,452 00 




5,726 


Windham, 


14,361,083 


57,444.33 


4,138.00 




2,069 


Litchfield, 


25,063,811 


100,255 23 


7,220.00 


674.72 


3,610 


Middlesex, 


14.739,668 


58,958 67 


4,208.00 




2,104 


Tolland, 


8,986,011 


35,944.04 


3,408.00 




1,704 




258,223,409 


1.032,893.fiV 


$57,712.00 


$17,327.87 


28,856 



East Haven, 
Metiden, 
Middletown, 
Chatham, 



TAXES UNPAID. 

$14,850.15 
172.26 



$15,022.41 



$297.00 
1,506.00 

502.46 



Total, 



$2,305.46 $17,327.87 



u 



TAX ON STATE BANKS. 



Name of Banks. 


Location. 


No. 


Par 


Market 


Am't Tax. 






Shares. 


Value. 


Value. 




jEtna 


Hartford, 


5/256 


£100 


$102 


$1,340.28 


Ansonia 


Ansonia, 


2 000 


50 


55 


275.50 


Bridgeport 


Bridgeport, 


4,323 


50 


55 


594.41 


Bridgeport City - 


" 


2,327 


100 


100 


581.75 


Central 


Middletown, 


1,500 


75 


78 


292 50 


Citizens 


Waterbury, 


3,094 


100 


104 


791.75 


City Bank 


Hartford, 


5,500 


100 


111 


1,522.12 


City Bank* - 


New Haven, 










Clinton 


Clinton, 


750 


100 


100 


187.50 


Commerce, Bank of 


New London, 


2,072 


100 


108 


559.44 


Conn. Riv. Ban kg Co.* 


Hartford, 










Connecticut - 


Bridgeport, 


3,321 


100 


108 


890.25 


Danbury - 


Danbury, 


3,27(i 


100 


100 


817.50 


Deep River - 


Deep River, 


1,500 


100 


104 


39.1.00 


Ea-t Had dam - 


East Haddam, 


824 


80 


75 


154.50 


Fairfield County - 


Norwalk, 


3,0i>0 


100 


110 


812.50 


Farmers and Mechanics 


Hartford, 


12,10o 


100 


118 


3,212.50 


Hartford 


" 


13,663 


100 


140 


3,696.52 


Hartford County 


«( 


6,000 


50 


57 


855.00 


Hatters - 


Bethel, 


1,000 


60 


50 


125.00 


Horne » 


Meriden, 


2,910 


100 


Ki4 


756.60 


Hurlburt 


West Winsted, 


' 2,050 


100 


115 


687.50 


Iron - - - - 


Falls Village, 


8,000 


25 


25 


500.00 


Jewett City - 


Jewett City, 


1,036 


60 


60 


155.40 


Litchfield County, - 


New Milford, 


1,250 


100 


110 


343.75 


Manufacturers 


Birmingham, 


6,145 


50 


60 


768.50 


Mechanics* 


New Haven, 










Mercantile 


Hartford, 


500 


90 


85 


1,062 50 


Merchants 


New Haven, 


10,00(i 


50 


50 


1,250.00 


Merchants 


Norwich, 


5,377 


40 


43 


575 25 


Meriden - 


Meriden, 


3,000 


100 


106 


795 00 


Middlesex County 


Middletown, 


3,50 


100 


115 


987 50 


Middletown 


" 


4,69f. 


75 


93 


1,103.25 


Mystic - 


Stonington, 


1.041 


50 


50 


litis 


Mystic River - 


Mystic River, 


2,10i 


50 


50 


262.50 


New Britain - 


New Britain, 


a.ioc 


100 


103 


540.75 


New England, Bank of 


Goodspee I's L., 


1,33^ 


100 


104 


346.84 


New Haven - 


New Haven, 


4,64e 


100 


130 


1,462.00 


New Haven County - 


" 


35,oOC 


8 


10 


87500 


New London 


New London, 


2,34t 


62 


75 


437.50 


Norfolk - 


Norfolk. 


1,005 


11 


80 


201.00 


Norwalk 


Norwalk, 


3.00( 


100 


100 


750.00 


Norwich - 


Norwich, 


2,200 


100 


106 


580.00 


Ocean - 


New London, 


1 02< 


100 


105 


267.75 


Pahquioque 


Danbury, 


2.507 


100 


100 


62^.75 


Pawcatuck 


Stonington, 


1,50( 


50 


48 


180.00 


Pequonnock 


Bridgeport, 


2,000 


100 


90 


450.00 


Phoenix and Branch 


Hartfd dz Litch. 


12,08* 


100 


116 


2,050.62 



* Exempt by charter. 



15 



TAX ON STATE BANKS— Continued. 



Name of Banks. 


Location. 


No. 

Shares. 


Par 
Value. 


Market 
Value. 


Am't Tax. 


Quinniphck 


New Haven, 


5,000 


$100 


$106 


$1,325.00 


Say brook 


Saybrook, 


844 


100 


105 


220.37 


Shetucket- 


Norwich, 


1,000 


100 


100 


250.00 


Southport 


South port, 


1,124 


100 


115 


323.15 


Stafford - 


Stafford Springs 


1,580 


100 


100 


395.00 


Stamford 


Stamford, 


6,734 


30 


35 


589.23 


State 


Hartford, 


4,400 


100 


130 


1,400.00 


Stonington - 


Stonington, 


1.200 


50 




180.00 


Thames - 


Norwich, 


5.820 


100 


112 


1,605.00 


Thompson 


Thompson, 


1,000 


70 


70 


175.00 


Tolland County 


Tolland, 


760 


100 


100 


190.00 


Tradesmen's - 


New Haven, 


3,000 


100 


108 


810.00 


Uncas 


Norwich, 


6,000 


50 


50 


750.00 


Union - 

<< 


New London, 


2,000 
1,000 


i 25 
f. 100 


28 
112 


I 420.00 


Waterbury 


Waterbury, 


10,200 


50 


55 


1,400.00 


Whaling 


New London, 


6,000 


25 


25 


495.62 


Windham 


Windham, 


1,000 


100 


105 


262.50 


Windham County - 


Brooklyn, 


952 


100 


105 


287.90 


Winsted - 


West Winsted, 


6,000 


50 


37| 


560.47 


Total, - 


$46,784.84 



16 



STATE TAX ON SAVINGS BANKS. 



NAME. 


Place. 


Reported 
Stocks. 


Tax Paid. 


Bethel Savings limk 


Bethel, 


$12,238.98 


$91.78 


Bridgeport Savings Bank 


Bridgeport, 


1,396,551.84 


6,347.26 


ii i< ... 


"' 


Arrears <fc Int 


6,567.23 


Chelsea Savings Bank 


Norwich, 


489,866.74 


2,668.62 


City Savings Bank 


Bridgeport, 


456,399 44 


1.042.00 


Collinsville Swings Society 


Collinsville, 


147,970.37 


1,109.78 


Connecticut Savings Bank 


New Haven, 


1,145 503.67 


8,591.26 


Derby Savings Bank 


Derby, 


283,82958 


2,128.72 


Deep River Savings Bank 


Deep River, 


134,046.94 


1,005.34 


Essex Savings Bank - 


Essex, 


226,391.05 


1,697.93 


Falls Village Savings Bank 


FmI Is Village, 


113,959.48 


854.70 


Farmers and Mech. Savings Bank - 


Middletown, 


237,492.32 


1,057.44 


Farmington Savings Bank 


Farmington, 


514.853.00 


2,676.40 


Groton Savings Bank 


Groton, 


302,706 27 


2,270.30 


Litchfield Savings Bank - 


Litchfield, 


258,897.29 


1,56272 


Manchester Savings Bank - 


Manchester, 


6,178.76 


46.34 


Mechanics Savings Bank - 


Hartford, 


157,889.76 


1,184.17 


Mechanics Savings Society - 


South Norwalk, 


38,362.03 


287.72 


Meriden Savings Bank - 


Meriden, 


342,245.74 


2,576.94 


Milford Savings Bank 


Mi ford, 






Middletown Savings Bank 


Middletown, 


2,070,911.61 


10,709.32 


New Canaan Savings Bank - 


New Canaan, 


70,610.27 


529.56 


New Haven Savings Bank 


New Haven, 


2,379,698.75 


17,847.74 


New Milford Savings Bank - 


New Milford, 


96,858.36 


729.34 


Newtown Savings Bank - 


Newtown, 


100,560.81 


754.20 


Norfolk Savings Bank 


Norfolk, 


39,113.00 


293 34 


Norwalk Savings Society 


Norwalk, 


492,347.64 


3,692.60 


Norwich Savings Society • 


Norwich, 


4,101,856.67 


19,190.58 


Putnam Savings Bank, - 


Putnam, 


. 68,272.89 


512.04 


People's Savings Bank 


Hartford, 


1,564.0S 


11.73 


People's Savings Bank - 


Bridgeport, 


271,587.02 


2,036.90 


Savings Bank of Ansonia 


Ansonia, 


42,791.56 


320.94 


Savings Bank of Danbury 


Danbury, 


564,012.21 


4,230.08 


Savings Bank of New Britain 


New Britain, 


86.955.31 


652.16 


Savings Bank of New London - 


New London, 


1,609,150.70 


12,068.62 


Savings Bank of Rockville • 


Itockville, 


268,475.75 


2.013.56 


Savings Bank of Stafford Springs 


Stafford Springs 


145,483.19 


1,090.92 


Savings Bank of Tolland 


Tolland. 


314,536.85 


2,359.03 


Seymour Savings Bank - 


Seymour, 


1,331.78 


10.00 


Society of Savings 


Hertford, 


5.084,554.74 


32.726.66 


ii it it m 


** 


Arrears cfe int. 


9,521.17 


Salisbury Savings Society - 


Lakeville, 


192,615,11 


1,444.62 


Southington Savings Bank 


Southington, 


36,701.17 


275.26 


Southport Saving! Bank 


Southport, 


297,974.18 


2,234.80 


Staffordviilo Savings Bank 


StdfTordville, 


103,041.46 


77 2.87 


Stamford Savings Bank 


S' am ford, 


452.345.57 


2,605.08 


State Savings Bank 


Hartford, 


653,680.11 


4.902.60 


it h m . 


" 


Arrears & int 


2,094.72 



17 



STATE TAX ON SAVINGS BANKS- Continued. 



NAME. 


Tlace. 


Reported 
Stock. 


Tax Paid. 


Stoningtjn Savings Bank 
Townsend Savings Bank 
Waterbury Savings Bank 
Westport Savings Bank 
Willirnantic Savings Institute - 

Winsted Savings !3ank 


Stonington, 
New Haven, 
Watevbury, 
Westport, 
Willirnantic, 

West Winsted, 


$346,190 90 

1,019,337 47 

497,500.00 

24,067.40 

304,081.81 

Arrears & int 

140,054.38 


$2596.42 

12.1 45. 0*2 

3,731.24 

185.01 

1,760.12 

582.88 

1,050.40 




2S.745.346.61 


$201,396.18 



STATE TAX ON SAVINGS BANKS AND BUILDING ASSO- 
CIATIONS. 



NAME. 


Place. 


Stock. 


Amt. Tax. 


Amt forward tax on Savings Banks, 






1201,396.18 


Ansonia Savings and Building A-so. 


An«onia, 


$990.21 


7.42 


Fair Haven Sav. Bank <fc Build. Asso. 


Fair Haven, 


610.46 


3.80 


Farmers & Mechanics Build. Asso. 


Norwich, 


For 1859, 


327.32 


M (1 U 


" 


u 1800, 


611.18 


ti <t ii 


4< 


" 1S61, 


600.95 


ii << ii 


K 


" 1862, unp. 




it u u 


u 


" 1863, " 




.< « n 


«« 


" 1864, " 




Mechanics Building Association, 


Bethel, 


11,474.24 


86.06 


Mec. «t Workingmen'- Build. Asso. 


Bridgeport, 


8,457.75 


63.43 


Mec. & Workingmcn's Build. Asso. - 


New Haven, 


26.579.1ft 


199.34 


Mec. & Workwomen's Build. Asso. 


Hartford, 


42,717.73 


320.38 


Middlesex Building Association 


Middletown, 


7.528.50 


66.46 


New Haven Building Association 


New Htven, 


17,532.00 


131.50 


People's Building Association 


Bridgeport, 


44.713.37 


3K5 34 


" «| »' 


'• 


Arrears 1863. 


660.50 


Woodbury Building Association - 


Woodbury, 


240 51 


1.80 


Young Men's Building Association 


Seymour, 


5,050.00 


37.88 


Am 1 t of Capital of Build. Asso. tax'd, 


$165,793.92 




Tot recM f'm Sav. B'ks & Build. Asso. 






$204,645.63 



RECAPITULATION. 



Savings Banks, ... 

Savings Banks and Building Associations, 

Total, 



- $28,745,346.61 $201,396.1$ 
165,793.92 3,249.35 



- $28,911,139.53 $204,645.53 



18 



STATE TAX ON INSURANCE COMPANIES. 



COMPANY. 



iEtna, .... 

Charter Oak Fire and Marine, 

City Fire, - 

City Fire, - 

Connecticut Fire, 

Continental Life, - 

Home, .... 

llartford Fire, 

Merchants, ... 

Norwalk Fire, 

New England Fire, - 

North American Fire, - 

Phoenix, .... 

Thames Fire, - 

Mutual Security, 

Norwich Fire, 

Charter Oak Life, (See Incorp. 



Location. 



Hartford, 

* 
New Haven, 
Hartford, 

New Haven, 
Hartford, 

Norwalk, 
Hartford, 



Norwich, 
jNew Haven 
Norwich, 
<fc Asso.) Hartford, 



No. 


Market ' 


Shares. 


Value. ! 


22,500 


$250 


3,000 


100 


25,000 


125 


20.000 


110 


2,000 


110 


6,000 


H 


5,000 


110 


10.000 


200 


2,000 


126 


1,000 


20 


2,000 


95 


3.000 


105 


6,000 


130 


1,170 


90 


2,000 


27 


6,000 


55 


2,000 


60 





Tax. 



$1,462.50 

750.00 

781.25 

550.00 

550.00 

111.50 

1.375.00 

5,000.00 

630.00 

50.00 

475.00 

787.50 

1,950.00 

263.25 

135.00 

825.00 



828.297.00 



STATE TAX ON THE CAPITAL OF MUTUAL INSURANCE 

COMPANIES. 



COMPANY. 


Location. 


Capital. 


Tax. 


American Mutual Life, - 


New Haven, 


$318,500.00 


$4,777.60 


^Etna Life, - 


Hartford, 


36,999.00 


554.98 


Phoenix Mutual, - 


" 


228,17364 


1,922 59 


Charter Oak, ... - 


u 


100,819.59 


1,512.29 


Connecticut Mutual, 


" 


2,463,241.13 


36,948.61 


Danbury Mutual Fire, 


Danbury, 


3,839.77 


57.59 


Farmington Valley Mutual, - 


Farmington, 


71355 


10.70 


Hartford County Fire, 


Hartford, 


48,095.28 


721.42 


Litchfield Fire, - 


Litchfield, 


17,868.99 


268.03 


Madison Mutual Fire, 


Madison, 


1,535.52 


23.03 


Middlesex Mutual Fire, 


Middletown, 


66,060.00 


990.90 


New London County Fire, 


Norwich, 


31,644.94 


474.68 


Norwich Assurance, 


<< 


6.666.67 


100.00 


Tolland County Mutual Fire, - 


Tolland, 


34,238.63 


514.07 


Windham County Mutual Fire, - 


Brooklyn, 


9,945.31 


149.17 


Greenwich Mutual Fire, - 


Greenwich, 


2,310.70 


34,66 


Total, .... 


$49,060.22 



19 



STATE TAX ON BANKS. 
NON-RESIDENTS. 



Names of Banks. 


Location. 


No. 
Shares. 


Par 

Value. 


Market 
Value. 


Am't Tax. 


iEtna, 


Hartford, 


87 


$100 


$102 


$66.55 


Ansonia, 


Ansonia, 


160 


50 


55 


66.00 


Bridgeport, 


Bridgeport, 


184 


50 


55 


77.55 


Bridgeport City, - 


M 


61 


100 


100 


45.75 


Central, 


Middletown, 


8 




78 


4.68 


Citizens, 


Waterbury, 


104 


100 


104 


81.12 


Citv Bank, 


Hartford, 


252 


100 


111 


254.74 


City Bank,* - 


New Haven, 


35 


100 


111 




Clinton, 


Clinton, 


75 


100 


100 


66.25 


Commerce, 


New London, 


110 


100 


108 


89.10 


Conn. Riv. Bank'g Co.,* 


Hartford, 










Connecticut, - 


Bridgeport, 


185 


100 


108 


149.85 


Danbury, - 


Danbury, 


163 


100 


100 


123.00 


Deep River, - 


Deep River, 


147 


100 


104 


11622 


East Haddam, - 


East Haddam, 


81 


80 


75 


45.55 


Fairfield County, - 


Norwalk, 


128 


100 


110 


105.60 


Farmers and Mechanics, 


Hartford, 


890 


100 


118 


787.65 


Hartford, 


" 


1,355 


100 


140 


1,433.60 


Hartford County, 


M 


281 


50 


67 


120.06 


Hatters, 


Bethel, 


138 


60 


50 


51.75 


Home, ... 


Meriden, 


216 


100 


104 


168.48 


Hurlbut, 


West Winsted, 


130 


100 


115 


112.13 


Iron Bank, 


Falls Village, 


649 


25 


25 


121.69 


Jewett City, - 


Jewett City, 


73 


60 


60 


32.65 


Litchfield County, 


New Milford, 


27 


100 


110 


22.28 


Manufacturers, 


Birmingham, 


236 


50 


50 


88.50 


Mechanics,* 


New Haven, 










Mercantile, - -* 


Hartford, 


353 


100 


85 


225.00 


Merchants, 


New Haven, 


6 


50 


50 


164.63 


Merchants, 


Norwich, 


196 


40 


43 


63.21 


Meriden, - 


Meriden, 


178 


100 


106 


141.61 


Middlesex County, - 


Middletown, 


123 


100 


115 


106.09 


Middletown, 


'« 


225 


75 


93 


174.38 


Mystic, - 


Stonington, 










Mystic River, - 


Mystic, 


10 


50 


50 


3.76 


New Britain, - 


New Britain, 










New England, - 


Goodspeed's Lan., 


46 


100 


104 


85.88 


New Haven, - 


New Haven, 


262 


100 


130 


256.45 


New Haven County, - 


«< 


3,332 


8 


10 


255.80 


New London, 


New London, 


72 


62* 


75 


40.50 


Norfolk, - 


Norfolk, 


156 


1X)0 


80 


93.60 


Norwalk, 


Norwalk, 


86 


100 


100 


64.50 


Norwich, • 


Norwich, 


125 


100 


106 


99.37 


Ocean, ... 


New London, 


27 


100 


105 


21.25 


Pahquioque, 


Danbury, 


281 


100 


100 


210.75 


Pawcatuck, - 


Stonington, 


131 


50 


48 


47.16 



Exempt by charter. 



20 



STATE TAX ON BANKS— Continued, 
NON-RESIDENTS. 



Names of Banks. 



Location. 



Pequonnock, 
Phoenix and Branch, 
Quinnipiack, 
Saybrook, 
Shetucket, - 
South port, 
Stafford, - 
Stamford, 
State, 

Stonington, - 
Thames, 
Thompson, 
Tolland County, 
Tradesmen's, - 
Uncas, 
Union, - 

Watcrbury, - 
Whaling, - 
Windham, 
Windham County, 
Winsted, 



Bridgeport, 

Hartfd tfc Litch'd, 

New Haven, 

Saybrook, 

Norwich, 

Southport, 

Stafford Springs, 

Stamford, 

Hartford, 

Stonington, 

Norwich, 

Thompson, 

Tolland, 

New Haven, 

Norwich, 

New London, 

Water bury, 
New London, 
Windham, 
Brooklyn, 
West Winsted, 



No. 


Tar 


Market 


Shares. 


Value. 


Value. 


68 


$100 


$90 


844 


100 


116 


257 


100 


106 


43 


100 


105 


30 


100 


100 


272 


100 


100 


720 


30 


35 


206 


100 


130 


158 


50 


55 


292 


100 


112 


88 


70 


70 


101 


100 


100 


233 


100 


108 


4V6 


50 


50 


30* 


f. 100 


112 




i 25 


23 


2S1 


50 


55 


626 


25 


30 


94 


100 


105 


48 


100 


105 


684 


50 


37* 



Am't Tax. 

$45.90 

850.28 

201.32 

33.86 

22.50 
204.00 
189.00 
200.85 

65.13 
245.28 

46.20 

75.75 
188.73 
1S6.00 

j- 25.62 

115.91 

140 85 

74.05 

37 80 

164.25 

$9,339.26 



21 



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INSURANCE COMPANIES. 
NON-RESIDENT TAX 



COMPANY. 



JStna Life, - 

iEtna, 

Charter Oak Fire and Marine, 
Charter Oak Life, 
Commercial Fire, 
City Fire, .... 

City Fire, - 

Home, 

Hartford, .... 
Mutual Security, 
New England Fire, 
North American Fire, 
Phcenix Insurance Company, 
Travelers Insurance Company, 
Phcenix Mutual Life, - 
Merchants Insurance, 
Phcenix Ins. Co., additional, 
Hartford Fire Ins. Co., additional, 

Total, .... 



Location. 



Hartford. 



New Haven, 
it 

Hartford, 
New Haven, 
Hartford, 



No. 


Market 


Shares. 


Value. 


$90 


$100 


3,919 


860 


127 


100 


50 


60 


162 


110 


342 


125 


715 


53.55 


397 


110 


2,642 


200 


221 


27 


118 


95 


792 


105 


730 


130 


255 


104 


167 


8 


144 


126 



Tax. 



$67.50 

7,348.13 

95.25 

22.50 

133.65 

320.61 

383.46 

827.53 

3,963.00 

44.76 

84.07 

623.70 

711.75 

198.90 

10.02 

136.02 

58.50 

164.00 

$14,693.41 



23 



STATE TAX ON AGENTS OF FOREIGN INSURANCE COM- 
PANIES. 



NAME OF AGENT. 


Location. 


Amount Prem. 
Reported. 


Tax. 


Abbott, A. F. 


Waterbury, 


•$1,236.56 


$24.73 


Adams, A. B. 


Willimantic, 


1,735.77 


34.72 


Ackley, E. - 


Middletown, 


887.19 


17.74 


Bartlett, E. 


Ansonia, 


36.U 


72 


Beckwith, J. G. 


Litchfield, 


132.00 


2.65 


Birdsye, T. G. - 


Derby, 


1,389.09 


27.78 


Cli ft, Isaac D. 


Groton, 


30.00 


60 


Clark, David H. - 


Stamford, 


1,141.12 


22.82 


Collins, C. F. - 


Middletown, 


823.92 


16.46 


Cowles, George R. 


Norwalk, 


6,164.96 


123.30 


Conner, William ... 


Hartford, 


12,126.67 


242.50 


Daskman, T. J. - 


Stamford, 


117.50 


2.35 


Denison, J. L. 


Norwich, 


1,093.00 


21.86 


Dyer, Henry A. - 


Brooklyn, 


5,732.12 


114.64 


Denison, Charles H. - 


Mystic Bridge, 


2,134.35 


42.69 


DeForest M. - 


Bridgeport, 


3,693.63 


73.87 


Dean, Charles G. 


Norwalk, 


143.50 


2.87 


Engs, William - 


Norwich, 


34.30 


70 


Ely, James - 


Thompsonville, 


367.38 


7.35 


Eaton, William P. 


Norwich, 


1,967.48 


39.34 


Fuller, Ebenezer ... 


Norwich, 


2,188.77 


43.76 


Fuller, William H. 


Suffield, 


590.92 


11.82 


Fuller, Joseph 


Suffield, 


1,16882 


23.36 


Frink, J. H. & A. 


New London, 


898.20 


17.96 


Gillette, Ralph 


Hartford, 


6,513.26 


130.26 


Germania Life Insurance Company, 


New Haven, 


3,884.27 


77.68 


Grant. 0. B. - 


Holyoke, 


882.75 


17.64 


Hall, H. D. 


Middletown, 


1,396.50 


27.93 


Hinsdale, John ... 


West Winsted, 


233 39 


4.65 


Hill, Austin A.- 


New Haven, 


1,025.15 


20.50 


Hodge, Edmund 


New London, 


4,335 60 


86.71 


Jacobs, 0. P. - 


Danielsonville, 


88.35 


1.77 


Kimball, C. C. 


Hartford, 


10,399 90 


207.98 


Learned, Joshua C. 


New London, 


1,975 98 


39.51 


Loomis, Charles F. - 


Suffield, 


244.54 


4.89 


Learned, E. 


Norwich, 


5,026.31 


100.52 


Lockwood, George - 


New Milford, 


638.53 


12.77 


Lamb, Joseph G. - - 


Norwich, 


1,007.90 


20.15 


Lester, George S. 


New Haven, 


10,364.98 


207.30 


Merriman, Asaph 


West Meriden, 


4,110.54 


82.21 


Nichols, H. .... 


Bridgeport, 


1,709.60 


34.19 


Perkins, George - 


Norwich, 


1,936.05 


67.08 


Peck, Jo>iah t. 


Bristol, 


7,161.42 


143.21 


Parsons, H. S. 


New Britain, 


4,116.96 


82.35 


Parsons, Guernsey S. 


Waterbury, 


417.46 


8.35 


Pond, Philip 


New Haven, 


8,194.76 


163.89 


Robinson, Charles 


New Haven, 


4,921.46 


98.43 


Root, George W. 


Hartford, 


1,495.37 


29.91 


Smith, J. W. ... 


Waterbury, 


16,403.33 


328.08 


Sheffield, Francis 


Pawcatuck, 


330.64 


6.60 



24 



STATE TAX ON AGENTS OF FOREIGN INSURANCE COM- 
PANIES— Continued. 



NAME OF AGENT. 


Location. 


Amount Prem. 
Reported. 


Tax. 


gouthworth & Field, • 


New Hi ven, 


$4,-175.70 


|tt9.5j 


Shernmn tfc Lockwood, - 


Bridgeport, 


14,209.95 


2-4 IS 


Sherman, Ira ... 


Bridgeport, 


5,054.38 


231.08 


Btickney, J. N. - 


Roekville, 


8,31 ~ 


16638 


Seg»*e. Lewis 0, 


Bridgeport, 


936.37 


18.72 


Woodford. E. S.- 


Wt-s' Winsted, 


731.74 


14.63 


White, Elbert, 


Stamford, 


821.04 


16.43 


Ward <k Sons, John B. - 


Norwich, 


0,703.43 


195.27 


Whiaimore, B. B. 


Norwich, 


l,13o.71 


22 61 


Wallace, William 


Hartford, 


9,550.47 


191.00 


Whitney. L. L. G. - 


Stamford, 


449.28 


9.00 


Y«K b*. l. 


Meriden, 


3,078.07 


61.60 


Frisbie it Wilson, 


New Haven, 


l(t,174.05 


203.48 


Fuller, Lucius S. - 


Tolland, 


1.S44.50 


36.89 


Goodwin James If . - 


Hartford, 


4,124.78 


S2.47 


North, J..hn G. - 


New Haven, 


910.47 


18.20 


Emmons, F. H. 


Meriden, 


3,419.03 


68.39 


Mix, Caleb 


New Haven, 


2.S36.23 


56.72 


Adams, A B. 


Willimantic, 


77.50 


1.55 


Butler, Henry 0. - 


Meri len, 


868.09 


17.36 


Collins, A. P. 


New Britain, 


2.936.7 9 


58.71 


Thomas. F.d^ar - 


Ni w London, 


4,875.88 


97.47 


Goodsell, E. B. 


; Bridgeport, 


2,3*7 «»5 


47.94 


Gray, J. C. 


West Meriden, 


2.498.73 


49.97 


Morse, Gar.lner 


New Haven, 


2.707.38 


54 15 


Stick ney, J. N. - 


■ Roekville, 


1,« )46.33 


20.93 


Appelman, Hiram 


Mystic River, 


217.11 


4 34 


Wheeler, Henry T. 


;Biid?eport, 


120.20 


2.40 


Hoadlev, H. P. 


New Haven, 


9.479.78 


189 59 


Hoyt, L. C. 


iDanbury, 


4,082 46 


81.65 


Mix. Caleb .... 


,New Haven, 


72 6S 


1.45 


Nichols. H. 


Bridgeport, 


3,206.00 


64.12 


Gray, J. H. - 


West Meriden, 


1,090.94 


21.82 


Total, 


£5.401.16 



25 



DIVIDENDS ON BANK STOCKS, 
OWNED BY STATE. 



NAMES OF BANKS 


Shares. 


Amount. 


Date of 
Dividend- 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Hartford Bank, 


1,650 


§165,000 


June, 


5 per cent. 


68,250.00 








December, 


5 " 


8,250.00 


Phoenix Bank, 


1,220 


122,000 


March, (none,) 












September, 


4 


4,880.00 


Farmers and Mechanics, 


49 


4,900 


August, 


t 


220.00 








February, 


t 


196.00 


New Haven Bank, 


274 


54,800 


July, 


51 " 


3,014.00 








January, 


3 u 


3,288.00 


Middletown Bank, 


£93 


59,300 


July, 


5 


2,965.00 








January, 


5 


2,965.00 




**34,O34.O0 



* Less error Farmers and Mechanics Bank, $30. 



STATE TAX ON AUCTION SALES. 



NAME. 


Location. 


Amount of 
Sales. 


Tax. 


Clark, - - - - 


Stamford, 


6360.00 


63.60 


Ford & Levitt. - 


Hartford, 


11,756.57 


117.57 


Hudson. B & W. - ' 


ii 


6,779 00 


65.79 


Kinne, AVm. H. - 


Norwich, 


8.529.11 


85.29 


Hudson, 13 & W. - 


Hartford, 


14,310.(0 


143.75 


Turne3*, Burnes - 


Nor walk, 


978.73 


9.75 


Turner, S. M. 


South Woodstock, 


250.00 


2.50 


Bx.th, B. 


New Haven, 


2.548.54 


25.49 


Greens] it, David 


Hampton, 


4.307.95 


43.08 


Ford <fe Levitt, - 


Hartford, 


12.753.99 


127.54 


Toohy, William -""-.- 


" 


2 786.34 


2786 


Arnold, Wm. R. - 


Woodstock, 


2,336.00 


23.36 


Hotchkiss, C. F. - 


New Haven, 


5,385.00 


53.85 




6729.43 



26 



TAX ON TURNPIKES AND BRIDGES. 
NON-RESIDENTS. 



COMPANY. 


No. 
Shares. 


Value. 


Tax. 


Bridgeport and Newtown Turnpike Comp'y, 
Derby Bridge Company, 
Hartford Bridge Company, 


600 
2 

67 


1 1 :. 

60 
160 


$18.75 

75 

73.20 




S92.70 



TAX FROM TELEGRAPH COMPANIES. 
NONE. 



DUTIES AND AVAILS OF COURTS. 



COUNTIES. 


Clerks of Courts. 


State's Attornies. 


Hartford County, .... 


$295.26 


$3,452.12 


New Haven " - 


787.8-1 


1,000.58 


New London " 


342.70 


1.091.72 


Fairfield u - - .'*'"- 


233.83 


1,600.27 


Windham " - - - 




140.00 


Litchfied " - 


386.25 


147.02 


"Middlesex «*..-. 


41.29 


277.88 


Tolland " - 




56.50 




$2,087.17 


$7,766.09 


Total avails of Courts and Bonds, 




f9.85S.86 



27 



TAX ON ASSOCIATIONS AND INCORPORATIONS. 



NAMES. 


No. 
Shares. 


Par 

Value. 


Market 
Value. 


Am't Tax. 


Williamsville Manufacturing Comp'y, 


2,000 


1000 




$500.00 


American Knife Company, 


1,000 


25 


27.50 


68.75 


Apothecaries Hall Company, 


800 


25 


25.00 


50.00 


Blake & Johnson, 


960 


25 




77.12 


Brown & Brothers, 


8,000 


25 




973.69 


Citizens Association, 


640 


25 




13.57 


Central Manufacturing Company, 


1,000 


100 




250.00 


Goodyear Metallic Company, 


12,000 


25 


60 per cent. 


450.00 


Granite Mill Company, 


2,000 


25 




125.00 


Hop River Company, 


360 




25.00 


22.50 


Hydeville Manufacturing Company, 


960 


25 




60.00 


Meriden Cutlery Company, 


4,000 


25 


37.50 


375.00 


Meriden Britannia Company, 


10,000 


25 


37.50 fc 
25.00 w 


937.50 


Montville Paper Company, 


400 




25.00 


Maltby, Morton & Co., 


960 




25.00 


60.00 


New Haven Manufacturing Company, 


4,000 




30.00 * 


300.00 


Oakville Company, 


3,000 




18.00 


135.00 


Parmelee Piano Forte Company, 


4,000 


25 


25 per cent. 


62.50 


Pettypaug Manufacturing Company, 


200 


25 


25.00 


12.50 


Pratt, Read & Co., 


7,000 


25 


25.00 


437.50 


Seth Thomas Clock Company, 


4,200 


25 


35.00 


367.50 


Steele & Johnson Button Company, 


240 


25 




23.26 


Starr, Clark & Co., 


400 


25 




20.00 


Smithville Manufacturing Company, 


6,400 


25 




400.00 


Seymour Manufacturing Company, 








35.00 
375.00N 


Thomas Manufacturing Company, 


6,000 


25 


25.00 


Turner & Clark Manufacturing Co., 








137.50 


United States Printing Company, 


2,400 


25 


18.00 


108.00 


Union Manufacturing Company, 


600 


26 


5.00 


7.50 


Waterbury Buckle Company, 


1,196 


25 




74.75 


"Waterburv Lumber and Coal Co., 


2,000 


25 




138.24 


Wilcox, J. <fc Co., 


8,000 


25 


25.00 


500.00 


Union Manufacturing Company, 


2,000 


25 


25.00 


125.00 


Russell Manufacturing Company, 


200 


500 


800.00 


400.00 


Falls Manufacturing Company, 


480 


25 


40.00 


48.00 


Candee, L. & Co., 


8,000 




25.00 


500.00 


Naugatuck Machine Company, 








45.00 


Rogers & Brothers, 


2,400 




25.00 


150.00 


Elm City Shirt Company, 


1,400 




23.92 


86.25 


Housatonic Transportation Company, 


1,200 




20.00 


60.00 


Merchants Navigation and Trans. Co., 


20,000 




26.25 


3,937.50 


Adams Express Company, 








1,000.00 


Hotchkiss Manufacturing Company, 


480 




12,00 


14.40 


Hartford Ice Company, 


2,000 


25 




62.50 


Mineral Spring Manufacturing Co., 


960 


25 




60.00 


Hayward Rubber Company, 


12,000 


25 


28.00 


840.00 


Quinnebaug Company, 


2,000 


100 




500.00 


Benedict, Merriman & Co., 


1,200 


25 


30.55 


91.61 


American Ring Company, 


640 


25 


26.47* 


42.35 


Eagle Mills Company, 


1,200 


25 




75.00 


Couversville Company, 


1,200 


25 




75.00 



28 



NAMES. 



Glyn Company, 

Valley Company, 

Roys'ct Wilcox Co, 

W. & \\ Douglass, 

Borden Condensed Milk Company, 

Cornwall Bridge Iron Company, 

Winstcil Manufacturing- Company, 

Bigelow Manufacturing Company, 

Orcutt ville Company, 

Sheldon cfe Osborn Manufacturing- Co, 

Middletown Can Light Company, 

Ilumphreysville Manufacturing Co, 

Eagle Lock Company, 

Staft odville Hanufacturing Company 

Hope Company, 

Beurdsley Syt^ie Company, 

Julius Pratt A, Co , 

New London Gas Light Company, 

Shflil or it Hall Quarry Company, 

Shelton Company, 

American Pin Company, 

Norwich Woolen Company, 

Kent Ore Hed Company, 

Bristol Manufacturing Company, 

"Willimant.ie Duck Company, 

Durham Manufacturifig Company, 

Eagle Warp Company, 

Union Knife Company, 

riainville Manufacturing Company, 

Wanregau Hotel Association, 

Peck Smith Manufacturing Company, 

Howe Manufacturing Company, 

Waterbury Button Company, 

Union Chair Company, 

Buckle Company, West Haven, 

Middlesex Quarry Company, 

Sequassen Woolen Company, 

Colchester Wheel Company, 

New London Horse Nail Company, 

Albertson & Douglass Machine Co., 

Northtiodd Knife Company. 

Norwich Bulletin Association, 

Winsted Foundry and Machine Co., 

New Haven Wheel Company, 

Waterbury Gas Light Company, 

New London Flax Company, 

Jewctt Manufacturing Company, 

Metropolitan Washing Machine Co., 

Bacon Arms Company, 

McDonough Hall Company, 

McDonough Hotel Company, 



) INCORPORATIONS— Continued. 


No. 


Par | 


Market 


Am't Tax. 


Shares. 


Value. 
$23 


Value. 




80" 




$50.00 


560 


25 




35.00 


2. GOO 


25 




162.M) 


1,800 




$100.00 


450.00 


210 


25 


37.50 


22.50 


40 


200. » 




200.00 


SOU 


50 


75.00 


93.75 

187.nO 

28.7$ 


900 


25 


56.25 


12C.5f 


2,280 


25 


21.75 


123. l .)8 


1.600 




30.00 


112.50 


8,640 


25 




331.12 


1,120 


25 




70.00 


l,20i» 


25 




75.00 


1,000 


25 




6-2.50 


#,096 


25 


17.50 


175.00 


1,400 


50 


12.50 


43.75 
12:-!. , .)0 


4,000 


25 


30.50 


305.28 


4,000 


25 


26.46 


264.60 


3,0i)0 


25 




187.50 


40;> 


25 


18.75 


1S.75 


3,00:) 


25 


16,G6£ 


125.00 


1,200 


25 


25.00 


75.00 


1,200 


25 




15.00 


200 


25 




12.50 


1,200 


25 


18.75 


50.25 


8,000 


25 




125.00 


1.600 


25 


9.12$ 


36.50 


5,000 


25 




312.50 


2,400 


25 


29.50 


177. t>0 


l,80o 




25.00 


112.50 


240 


25 


25.00 


15.00 


680 


25 


40.00 


68.00 


1,000 


100 


225.00 


51V2.50 


1,280 


25 


37.50 


120.00 


350 


25 




21.87 


400 


25 


37.50 


37.50 


2,400 




6.25 


37.50 


800 


25 


27.50 


55.00 
26.25 


572 


25 


12.50 


17.87 


?,40C 




15.0.) 


90.00 


4.O0C 


25 


7.50 


75.00 


4.HDI 




7.50 


75.00 


84f 


25 




52.50 


48C 






15< >.oo 


1,2(M 


) 25 




75.00 


401 


> 


20.00 


20.00 


70C 




50 


88 



29 



TAX ON" ASSOCIATIONS AND INCORPORATIONS- Continued. 



NAMES. 



Northfield Manufacturing Company, 

Bristol Brass and Clock Company, 

Malleable Iron Filling Company, 

S. Stow Manufacturing Company, 

Merrlman Manufacturing Company, 

Danbury Gas Light Company, 

R N. Welch Manufacturing Compan} 

Terr'v Manufacl ming Company, 

C. B* Rogers & Co., 

"Windermere Woolen Company, 

Vall< j y Manufacturing Company, 

Lindon Iron Company, 

Turner Twine Company, 

Sierry Faueett Company, 

Winsted Carriage Company, 

Qninnipiack Compan}^, 

Benedict & Bnrnham Mannfactur'g Co 

Connecticut Manufacturing Company, 

Norwich Blenching and Cidender'g Co., 

Derby Building and Lumber Company, 

New Haven Water Company, 

Willimantic Gas Company, 

Mill River Woolen Manufacturing Co 

Warner, Mansfield & Stiles Brick Co 

Naugatuck Gas Light Company, 

Thames Iron Works, 

Ilummasson & Becklcy Manufac'g Co 

Stanley Works, 

Hartford Carpet Company, 

Collins Company, 

Wellington Glass Company, 

Meriden Gas Light Company, 

Fobes Iron Company, 

Wallace & Son-;, 

Lime Rock Iron Company, 

Holmes, Booth & Ilayden, 

Wolcott Paper Manufacturing Comp'y, 

Uncas Hall & Co., 

IIatford Citv Gas Light Company, 

Danbury Public Hall Company, 

Norwich and New York Packet Co., 

Norwich Gas Light Company, 

Central Whaif Planing Company, 

Lane Manufacturing Company. 

Norwalk Gas Light Company, 

Plant's Manufacturing Company, 

Winsted Gas Company, 

Bacon Manufacturing Company, 

Tuttle Manufacturing Company, 

Hartford & New York Steamboat Co., 

New England Printing Company, 



No. 


Par 


Shares. 


Value. 






240 


$25 


4,000 


25 


4,000 




1,248 


25 


1,000 


25 


4,000 


25 


2,w00 


25 


1,600 




800 


25 


40(> 


25 


800 




240 


25 


200 


25 


16,000 


25 


1,000 


25 


2.200 


25 


4,786 




800 




2,( 100 


25 


7 2ii 




260 




800 


25 


1,400 


25 


1,200 




13,310 


100 


40,000 


10 


260 


25 


2,000 


25 


1,200 


25 


4,000 


25 


3,000 


25 


13,225 


25 


680 




480 


25 


10,0<)(> 




160 


25 


352 


25 


4,000 




800 




1,313 


25 


342 


25 


800 


25 


4,000 


25 


8,0n0 


25 


4,000 


25 



Market 
Value. 



$37.50 
21.00 
16.50 
31.00 



20.00 

25.00 

76.50 

16.00 
21.00 
50.00 
37.10 



12.50 
45.00 
20.00 

33.00 
5.00 

18.75 

28.75 

12.50 
34.00 
17.75 



16. 66 1 

33.75 

12.50 

27.50 
80 p c. pd. in 

12.50 
25.00 

12.50 
27.50 

6.25 

14.25 
31.25 
10.00 



Am't Tax. 

$2.25 

375.00 

210.00 

52.00 

77.50 

27.00 

250.00 

100.00 

250.00 

100.00 

8.75 

153.00 

25.00 

31.81 

12.60 

25.00 

1,305.00 

62.50 

187.50 

68.75 

532.80 

40.00 

125.00 

59.40 

2.50 

50.00 

65.62 

86.25 

3,926.45 

1,250.00 

22.10 

88.75 

150.00 

250.00 

125.00 

1,115.81 

21.25 

30.00 

687.50 

8.00 

11.00 

250.00 

60.00 

25.00 

90.27 

140.62 

5.H5 

6(1.00 

142.50 

625.00 

100.00 



30 



TAX ON ASSOCIATIONS AND INCORPORATIONS— Continued. 



NAMES. 



Wanregan Mills. 

Pine Brook Duck Company, 

Uncasville Manufacturing Company, 

Hartford Bridge Company, 

Elting Woolen Company/ 

Scoville Manufacturing; Company, 

Joslyn Fire Arms Company, 

Thompson Wadding Company, 

City Mrnnfacturiflg Company, 

G. F. Warner & Co., 

New Haven Gas Light Company, 

Bristol Trading Company, 

New York Belting and Packing Co., 

Connecticut Arms Company, 

Hartford Steam Printing Company, 

Hall, Elton & Co., 

Comstock. Fenn & Co., 

Phoenix Rubber Company, 

Windham Cotton Manufacturing Co., 

Hazard Powder Company, 

Whitney Arms Company, 

Johnson, Bobbins & Co., 

Barnum, Richardson & Co., 

Chelsea File Company, 

Russell Erwin Manufacturing Co., 

Cheshire Manufacturing Company, 

Wallingford Public Building Company. 

Sharp's Rifle Manufacturing Company, 

Charter Oak Life Insurance Company, 

Farmers and Mechanics Mining Co., 

Springfield Paper Company, 

Keeny & Wood Manufacturing Co.. 

Rockland Paper Company, 

Clifton Mills Company, 

Hoyt Manufacturing Company, 

Hawkins Manufacturing Company, 

Hunt Lyman Iron Company, 

New Haven Chemical Works, 

Harris Sythe Company, 

French Railroad Splice Company, 

J. Shepard cfc Co., 

Phoenix Mills. 

Brook Pit Mining Company, 

Norwich Marine Railway Company, 

American Suspender Company, 

Falls Village Water Power Company, 

P. & T. Corbin, 

Hartford Dry Dock Company, 

Wilson Manufacturing Company, 

Daleville Mills, 

New Britain Knitting Company, 



No. 


Par f 


Shares. 


Value. 


10,000 


$50 


320 


25 


3,000 


25 


600 




4,000 




12,000 




1,600 


25 


320 


25 


400 


25 


10,000 


25 


480 


25 


8,000 


25 


1,040 




3,000, 
1,600 


25 


25 


4,000 




192 


100 


6,250 




760 


25 


1,600 


25 


4,000 




5,000 


25 


4,000 




2,000 


25 


1,000 


25 


1.400 


25 


600 


25 


1,000 


25 


1,680 


25 


1,200 


25 


480 


25 


480 


25 


1,000 


25 


672 


25 


230 


25 


7,200 


25 


8,000 




2,000 




720 


25 


4,000 




800 


25 


8,000 


25 



M irkct 
Value. 



$75.00 

12.50 

28.00 
1 GO. 00 

25.00 

67.50 

12.50 
75 00 

26.50 
8.33£ 

Paid in part. 

3.00 

27.50 

400.00 

100.00 



40.00 



25.00 
25.00 
37.50 
25.00 
25.50 
50.00 
25.00 
25.00 

25.00 
25.00 
19.00 
20.00 
32.50 
5.00 
37.50 

20.00 
25.00 
28.00 



Am't Tax. 



11,875.00 

10.00 

212.50 

240.00 

250.00 

1.726.00 

100.00 

10.00 

75.00 

150.00 

662.50 

10.00 

500.00 

25.00 

10.30 

206.26 

100.00 

250.00 

192.00 

1,562.50 

190.00 

100.00 

250.00 

10.35 

1,250.00 

175.00 

10.00 

500.00 

300.00 

10.00 

125.00 

126.00 

62.50 

131.25 

37.50 

62.50 

210.00 

75.00 

30.00 

3.75 

30.00 

62.50 

32.00 

11.50 

586.00 

100.00 

187.50 

25.00 

200.00 

50.00 

560.00 



31 



TAX ON ASSOCIATIONS AND INCORPORATIONS- Continued. 



NAMES. 


No. 


Par 


Market 


Arn't Tax. 




Sharee. 


Value. 


Value. 




Birmingham Water Company, 


800' 


$25 


$20.62^ 


$41.25 


Malleable Iron Works, 


1,400 


25 


25.00 


87.50 


American Mills, 


4,000 




43.75 


437.50 


Elliottville Manufacturing Company, 


2,000 


25 


25.00 


125.00 


Centerville Company, 


2,000 


25 


4.00 


20.00 


Iron and Steel Works, 








269.96 


Plainville Water Power Company, 


1,200 


25 


6.00 


18.00 


Greenwood Company, 


S,157f 


25 


20.00 


407.88 


Nonvalk Mills, 


6,000 


25 




93 75 


Stanley Rule and Level Company, 


4,000 




30.00 


300.00 


Hunt Canfield Iron Company, 


484 


25 


25.00 


30.25 


Holly Manufacturing Company, 


1,600 


25 


25.00 


100.00 


Washing Company, 


800 


25 


25.00 


50.00 


Hartford File Company, 


2,940 




1.25 


9.18 


Globe Mills Company, 


560 


25 


37.50 


52.50 


North & Judd Manufacturing Compa'y, 


2,400 


25 


25.00 


150.00 


Colt's Patent Fire Arms Company, 


10,000 


100 


200.00 


5,000.00 


Enfield Manufacturing Company, 


11,648 


25 


15.00 


436.80 


Union Company, Stamford, 


292 




30.00 


21.90 


Norton Mills Company, 


215 


25 


25.00 


13.44 


People's Coal Company, 


400 


25 


22.20 


22.00 


Moodus Manufacturing Company, 


500 


80 


80.00 


100.00 


New Haven Steamboat Company, 


2,000 


100 


150.00 


750.00 


Atlantic Dock Company, 


1,600 


25 


12.50 


50.00 


Platner & Porter Manufacturing Co., 


3,400 




33.75 


286.85 


Kent Manufacturing Company, 


4,000 




12.50 


125.00 


Clapp Manufacturing Company, 


464 




25.00 


29.00 


Saugatuck Manufacturing Company, 








15.00 


Hartford and Long Island Steamb't Co., 








120.00 


East Haddam Duck Company, 








30.00 


W. A. Ives & Co., 








56.25 


Farral Foundry and Machine Comp'y, 


3,600 


25 


25.00 


225.00 


Union Nut Company, 


1,200 




20.00 


60.00 


Total year, 


$57,743.29 



32 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 



A. Walker, escheated estate of James Cannon, deceased, 
W. A. Aiken, Q. M. Gen., Balance returned, 

Town of Bloomfield, Bounties returned, 

" Farmington, " 

F. A. Brown, Treas. Hartford, Bounties returned 
E. S. Sanford, duties on auction sales, 
Capt. S. Sterling:, Bridgeport, equipments lost, 
W. Woodbury, Treas., escheated estate, . 
Town of Woodbury, Bounties families returned, 
John Allen, Mileage returned, 
Charles Boswell, " . . 

S. N. Reed, 
S. E. Elmore, " 

D. W. Plumb, " 
0. II. Piatt, 
L. E. Curtiss, 

E. Leaven worth, " 

C. H. Mallory, 
0. n. Perry, 

D. B. Hoyt, 

L. Wetmore, " " 

W. B. Kingsbury, " " 

George Mallory, " " 

Geo. S. Hubbard, " 

H. K. Welch, 

Town of Waterbury, Bounties returned 

" Watertown, 

<< << << << 

" Middletown, " M 

" Sprague, 

B. N. Warring. " " 

Town of Windsor, " " 

•' Tolland, 

" Windsor Locks, " " 

" Hartford, 

41 New London, u " 

Thomas K. Brace, non-resident Bank Tax, ^Etna Bank, 



$1,050/0 

209.43 

48.00 

4.00 
161.20 
3S.04 
G5.55 
28.11 
14.20 
12.96 
14.40 
25.08 
16 20 

7.20 

6.12 
11.88 
18.00 
23.76 

9.90 
15.12 
10.08 
19.44 
16.92 

6.30 
12 96 
39.26 
12.00 
18.40 
30.20 
18.00 
100.00 
210.00 
18.00 
22.25 
11.70 
65.33 
12.00 

7.65 



33 



Town of Pomfret, Bounties returned, 

" Norwich, " " . 

" PlaiDfield, 

" Sprague, " u . 

«' Torrington, " '* 

" New Haven, " . * * 

u Windsor, Interest received on State Tax, 

* Plainfield, Bounty returned, 



$24.00 
18.00 
10.00 
16.60 
18.00 
72.59 
16.75 
11.50 

$2,597.08 



Dr, CHARGES. 

Paid B. M. Nearing, Bounty money, 
" Town of Tolland, " " 

" " Windsor Locks, Bounty money, 

Balance, 



$310.00 
22.25 
11.70 



843.95 



$2,253.13 



34 
TRIAL BALANCE. 



Dr. CIVIL LIST. 

To paid Registered Orders of Comptroller, . . . $181,742.64 

" " Civil List " " ... 4,523,942.39 

" " Interest on State Bonds, ..... 358,653.00 

41 Balance to April 1, 1865, ..... 3,428.16 



$5,067,766.19 



Dr. SCHOOL FUND. 

To Commissioner's Orders, Principal School Fund, . . $294,191.61 

" Balance of Revenue School Fund, .... 435.00 

" Revenue School Fund Commissioner's Orders, . . . 124,525.56 

" Interest School Fund, Dividend Orders, . . . 138,619.50 

•• Balance to April 1, 1865, ..... 33,478.65 

$591,250.32 



35 



TRIAL BALANCE. 



CIVIL LIST. 
By balance on hand, April 1, 1864, 
Dividends from Banils, 
Miscellaneous Receipts, 
Avails of Courts and Bonds, 
State Bonds, (Pr^m.) .... 
Tax on Agents of Foreign Insurance Companies, 

" Non-vesident Bank Stock, 

" " Insurance Stock, 

" '• Turnpike and Bridge Stock, 

" Railroad Companies, 

" Capital Mutual Insurance Companies, . 

" Savings Banks and Building Associations, 

" Towns, ..... 

" State Banks, 

" Incorporations and Associations, 

" Auction Sales, 

" Insurance Companies, , 
Temporary Loans unpaid, . 
State Bonds, ..... 



Cr. 

$49,774.04 

34,034.00 

2,253.13 

9,853.26 

8,598.38 

5,401.16 

9,339.26 

14,693.41 

92.70 

199,735.00 

49,060.22 

204,645.53 

1,073,277.75 

46,784.84 

57,743.29 

729.43 

28,297.00 

1,273,453.79 

2,000,000.00 



By Balance, April 1, 1865, 



$5,067,766.19 
$3,428.16 



SCHOOL FUND. Cr. 

By Principal balance, April 1, 1864, .... $688.19 

" Collections of Principal, ..... 298,300.56 

" Revenue School Fund Collections, Principal and Interest, . 123,337.97 

" Balance School Fund', April 1, 1864, . . . 28,705.08 

" Interest School Fund Collections. .... 140,218.52 

$591,250.32 



By Balance, April 1, 1865, 



$33,478.65 



36 
TRIAL BALANCE. 



Dr. normal school. 

To paid Comptroller's Orders, July, 1864, . . . $2,033.60 

" " " December, 1864, . . 1,746.67 

" " March, 1865, . . ■ 1,407.24 

To Balance to April 1,1865, ..... 2,928.52 



Dr. INSANE POOR FUND. 

To paid order, April, 1864, 

" July, 1864, 

« " Oct., 1864, 

" Jan., 1865, 

To Balance to April 1, 1865, 



$8,116.03 



$5,423 90 


2,550.16 


3,502.59 


4,203.68 


3,766.72 


$19,447.05 



Dr. general hospital society. 

To paid order, April, 1864, $241.97 

" June, 1864, ..... 518.75 

" July, 1864, S10.83 

" " Oct., 1864, ..... 478.43 

" Jan., 1865, ...... 474.99 



$2,024.97 



To Balance, April 1, 1865, ?92.05 



37 



TRIAL BALANCE. 



NORMAL SCHOOL. 



By Balance on hand April 1, 1864, 
11 Grant, 1864, received, 



Cb. 

$3,116.03 
6,000.00 



$8,116.03 



By balance on hand, April 1, 1865, 



$2,928.52 



INSANE POOR FUND. 



By balance on hand, April 1, 1864, 
" Grant, 1864, Registered Order, 



Cr. 

$4,447.05 
15,000.00 



$19,447.05 



By balance on hand, April, 1865, 



$3,766.72 



GENERAL HOSPITAL SOCIETY. 



By balance on hand, April 1, 1864, 
11 April, 1, 1865, 



Ck 

$1,232.92 
792.05 



$2,024.97 



38 



TRIAL BALANCE. 



Dr. DEAF AND DUMB. 

To paid order, April, 1864, 
" Oct., 1864, 
To balance, April 1, 1865, .... 



$2,312.50 

2,562.06 

515.91 



Dr. 



INTEREST TOWN DEPOSIT FUND. 



To Interest paid Town of Granby, 

Rocky Hill, 
Bolton, 
Southbury, 
North Branford, 
Wethersfield, 
Balance, to April 1, 1864, 



$5,390.47 



$299.45 


180.01 


114.65 


214.S6 


164.78 


303.89 


395.22 



$1,672.86 



Dr. 

To paid order, April, 1864, 
" " " Oct., 1864, 
" " " Jan., 1865, 



HARTFORD HOSPITAL. 



$605.72 
501.64 
531.00 



$1,638.36 



To balance, April 1, 1865, 



$174.05 



39 
TRIAL BALANC 



DEAF AND DUMB. Ca. 

By balance, April 1, 1864, . . . . . . $1,390.47 

" Grant, 1864, Registered Order, .... 4,000.00 



n u 



$5,390.47 



By balance, April 1, 1865, . . . . . $515.91 



STATE PRISON MEDICAL SOCIETY. Ce. 

By balance on hand, April 1, 1865, .... $1,455.00 



INTEREST TOWN DEPOSIT FUND. . Ce. 

By balance on hand, April 1, 1864, .... $30.73 

" Interest collected, ...... 1,642.13 



$1,672.86 



By balance, April 1, 1865, ...... $395.22 



HARTFORD HOSPITAL. Ca. 

By balance, April 1, 1864, ...... $1,464.31 

April 1, 1865, ..... 174.06 



$1,638.36 



40 



TRIAL BALANCE. 



Dr. 

To paid order, April, 1864, 

' l " Oct., 1864, 

11 " June, 1864, 

" M Jan., 1865, 

11 Feb., 1865, 

To balance to April 1, 1865, 



INDIGENT IDIOTS. 



$350.00 
425.00 
441.66 
450.00 
737.50 

1,834.61 

$4,238.77 



Dr. THE GOVERNOR, FOR SICK AND WOUNDED SOLDIERS. 



To paid 


order 


, April, 1864, 


$371.04 


t< 


u 


May, 1864, 


2,385.86 


u 


n 


June, 1864, 


15.00 


(< 


II 


July, 1864, 


956.73 


a 


«< 


Aug., 1864, 


532.25 


M 


a 


Sept., 1864, 


1,473.44 


(( 


<( 


Oct., 1864, 


1,678.51 


U 


ii 


Nov., 1864, 


2,683.67 


II 


M 


Dec, 1864, 


603.69 


" 


" 


Jan., 1865, 


1,245.85 


<( 


II 


Feb., 1865, 


777.85 


II 


II 


March, 1865, 


2,278.67 


To balance, to April 1, 1865, 


5,940.66 



$20,943.22 



Dr. 

To paid order, Nov., 1864, 
To balance, April 1, 1865, 



INDIGENT BLIND. 



$1,500.00 
1,500.00 



$3,000.00 



41 



TRIAL BALANCE. 



INDIGENT IDIOTS. Cr. 

By balance, April 1, 1864, ..... $1,238.71 

By Grant, 1864, Registered Order, .... 3,000.00 



$4,238.77 



By balance, April 1, 1865, ...... $1,834.61 



THE GOVERNOR FOR SICK AND WOUNDED SOLDIERS. Cr. 

By balance, April 1, 1864, ..... $10,943.22 

By Grant, Registered Order, ..... 10,000.00 



$20,943.22 



By balance, April 1, 1865, ..... $5,940.66 



INDIGENT BLIND. Cr. 

By Grant, Registered Order, 1864, .... $3,000.00 



$3,000.00 



By balance, April 1, 1865, ..... $1,500.00 



TRIAL BALANCE. 



Dr. STATE PRISON. 

To balance, April 1, 1865, ..... $19,000.00 



Dr. THE GOVERNOR, FOR NATIONAL MONUMENT AND CEME- 
TERY AT GETTYSBURG. 

To paid order, ....... $840.00 

""....... 840.00 

To balance, ..... . 1,320.00 



$3,000.00 



Dr. PRINCIPAL TOWN DEPOSIT FUND. 

To Loan, April 28, 1864, $1,055.44 

" over Loan, April 28, 1864, .... 325.00 

" Bills payable, ....... 23,760.14 



$25,140.58 



To balance, April 1, 1865, $825.00 



43 
TRIAL BALANCE. 



GOV. W. A. BUCKINGHAM, FOR EXPENSE INCURRED BY HIM. Cn. 
By balance, April 1, 1865, ..... $3,000.00 



THE GOVERNOR, FOR NATIONAL MONUMENT AND CEME- Ce. 
TERY AT GETTYSBURG. 

By Civil List Order, ...... $3,000.00 



$3,000.00 



By balance, April 1, 1865, ..... $1,320.00 



LOAN ACCOUNT. 
By balance, D. Sage, loan, April 1, 1865, .... $3,300.00 



PRINCIPAL TOWN DEPOSIT FUND. Cn. 

By balance, April 1, 1864, ...... $1,055.44 

" Collections during year, ..... 23,760.14 

" Balance, ....... 325.00 

$25,140.00 



TRIAL BALANCE. 



Dr. SINKING FUND. 

July 27, to amount Tax to Gov., due June 26, 1862, . . $261,981.90 

." paid back Interest on Bonds, . . . 7,282.91 

" " Bonds to Sinking Fund, 1862, . . . 682,500.00 

" u " 1864, . . . 365,500.00 

Balance, ........ 83,866.25 



$1,401,131.06 



45 
TRIAL BALANCE. 



SINKING FUND. Cr. 

July 27, By IT. S. Certificate, March 28, 1862, . . . $606,000.00 

" " Interest on above to June 26, 1862, . . 9,961.63 

" June 26, 1863, . . . 21,238.78 

" '• Premium on Coin, ..... 6,835.91 

Oct. 22, By Money reimbursed, ..... 8,915.07 

1865. 

Jan. 5, " 812,785.71 

" 6, " " . . . . . 200,000.00 

'* 7, " ... . 100,000.00 

By Interest and Premium from Nov. 7, 1863, to May 7, 1865, 135,393.96 



$1,401,131.06 



By balance, April 1, 1865, ...... $83,866.25 



SINKING FUND OF 1862. Cr. 

By U. S. Bonds, ....... $682,500.00 



SINKING FUND OF 1864. Cr. 

By U.S. Bonds, $365,500.00 



46 



GENERAL BALANCE. 
Dr. GABRIEL W. COITE, TREASURER, 

To Receipts— Balance on hand, April 1, 1864, $108,190.93 

Civil List 5,017,992.16 

School Fund, 661,857.05 

" Town Deposit Fund, Interest Account, 1,642.13 

" Normal School, 5,000.00 

" Insane Poor, 1 5,000.00 

" Deaf and Dumb, 4,000.00 

" Indigent Idiots, 3,000.00 

" Sick and Wounded Soldiers, 10,000.00 

Indigent Blind 3,000.00 

" National Monument, 3,000.00 

" Contingent Fund, 3,325.02 

«« Sinking Fund, 1,131,866.25 

" State Reform School, 1,000.00 

Town Deposit Fund, Principal 23,760.14 



$6,892,633.67 



Balance, April 1, 1865, Si 26,438.60 

TABLE BALANCES. 
Dr. BALANCES BELONGING TO THE SEVERAL FUNDS. 

Civil List Fund, $3,428.16 

School Fund 33,478.65 

Normal School Fund, 2.928. 6S 

Insane Poor Fund 8.7C 

Deaf and Dumb, 515.91 

State Prison Medical Society 1,455.00 

Town Deposit Fund, Interest Account 395.22 

W. A. Buckingham, 3,000.00 

Indigent Idiots. 1,834.61 

Sick and Wounded Soldiers, Contingent Fund, 5,940.66 

Indigent Blind, 1,500.00 

Sinking Fund, 83,866.25 

National Monument and Cemetery at Gettysburg, 1,320.00 

Loan Account, (D. Sage,) T 3,300.00 

$146,720.70 

April 1, 1865.— Balance on hand in Treasury, $126,438.60 



47 



GENERAL BALANCE. 

IN ACCOUNT WITH THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT. Cr. 

By Payments— Civil List, $5,064,338.03 

School Fund, 557,771.67 

" Town Deposit Fund, Interest Account, 1,277.64 

Normal School, ; 5,187.51 

Insane Poor, 15,680.33 

Deaf and Dumb, 4,874.56 

Indigent Idiots, 2,404.16 

" Sick and Wounded Soldiers, 15,002.56 

Indigent Blind, ; 1,500.00 

" National Monument, 1,680.60 

•' General Hospital 2,024.97 

State Reform School, 1,000 00 

Hartford Hospital, 1,638.36 

'« Town Deposit Fund, Principal, 24,815.28 

Sinking Fund, 1,048,000.00 

• State Prison, 19,000.00 

Balance 126,438.60 



-$6,892,633.67 



TABLE BALANCES. 

BALANCES BELONGING TO THE SEVERAL FUNDS. Cr. 

General Hospital '. $792.05 

Hartford Hospital, 1 74.05 

State Prison, 19,000.00 

Town Deposit Fund, 325.00 



Balance, 126,438.60 

$146,729.70 



48 






Treasurer's Office, ) 
Hartford, April, 1865. f 

The subscribers, appointed by the General Assembly to 
audit the accounts of the State Treasurer, have examined the 
same, from the 1st day of April, 1864, to the 31st day of 
March, 1S65, both days inclusive, and have compared the 
same with the several vouchers, and find the same correct. 

A summary statement of said accounts is given above, 
which shows the balance of cash on hand on the 31st day of 
March, A. D. 1865, to have been one hundred and twenty- 
six thousand four hundred and thirty-eight 60-100 dollars, 
($126,438.60.) 

HENEY K. W. WELCH, ) Auditors of 
CHARLES BOSWELL, j State Accounts. 

I hereby certify that the foregoing Treasurer's Report is cor- 
rect, so far as the same relates to, or is connected with, the 
School Fund. 

ALBERT SEDGWICK, 
Commissioner of the School Fund. 
School Fund Office, ) 
Hartford, Aprel, 1865. ) 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Comptroller of fjtttlie %ttamts f 



TO THE 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 



MAY SESSION, 1865. 



frinto bjr ©rte 0f % f fgistataa 



NEW HAVEN: 
CARRINGTON & HOTCHKISS, STATE PRINTERS. 

1865. 



COMPTROLLER'S REPORT. 



State of Connecticut, ) 

Comptroller's Office, May 3d, 1864. f 

To the Honorable, the Senate and House of Representatives, 
now in session : 

Herewith, I have the honor to submit my fourth annual 
report, exhibiting the receipts and expenditures of the Public 
Funds, for the fiscal year ending March 31st, 1865. 

Table 1. Shows the debenture and contingent expenses of 

the General Assembly. 
Table 2. Account of Salaries. 
Table 3. Contingent expenses, including Grants. 
Table 4. Judicial " " " 

Table 5. Expense of supporting the State Paupers. 
Table 6. Expense superintending Common Schools. 
Table 7. Salary of Directors of the State Prison. 
Table 8. Account of Public Buildings and Institutions. 
Table 9. Expense of Families of Volunteers. 
Table 10. Advances to the Quarter-Master-General. 
Table 11. Advances to the Paymaster-General. 
Table 12. Advances to the Adjutant-General. 

The citizens of this Commonwealth see plainly before them, 
a great and increasing burden of taxation, arising from the 
struggle for national existence, in which we are engaged, and 
which has been so needlessly and wickedly protracted. 

The rich, those of moderate means, and the poor, are alike 
sensitive under these burdens. 



It becomes us, therefore, to act guardedly, and endeavor so 
to legislate, that the most rigid equality shall be maintained, 
while seeking new sources of taxation, or when increasing 
those already established. 

The law of 1864, by which certain chartered Institutions 
were specially taxed, appears to me, to be open to this objec- 
tion of inequality. 

I find no disposition among our loyal tax-payers to flinch 
from their full proportion of the expenses of Government ; 
they make no complaint against the amount imposed, only 
against the unequal manner in which it is imposed. 

Thus when a corporation is called upon to pay a heavy tax, 
while a partnership or individual concern, carrying on the 
same business, and to a like extent, side by side, is not included 
in the system adopted, nor called upon to take their turn a 
the laboring oar, you may well expect an outcry, that must, 
and will be respected. 

I think that no good reason can be given, why this obvious 
inequality should be retained. 

I would respectfully recommend a modification of this law, 
or that its provisions may be made more universal in opera- 
tion, if longer continued on the statute book. 

The law, Chap. 33, entitled " An Act in addition to an act 
relating to Courts," passed at the last session of the General 
Assembly, by which the State may be compelled to appear 
before any of our courts, upon the claim of any individual, 
appears fraught only with trouble and unnecessary expense to 
all concerned. It must have been aimed especially at this 
Department. 

I have no recollection of a claim free from taint, ever hav- 
ing been suspended, certainly never absolutely rejected. 

The State, in these matters, is more sinned against than sin- 
ning. Just demands, when necessary, can be more easily and 
economically investigated by a committee of the Legislature, 
it is believed, than when prosecuted, possibly, in a distant part 
of the State, defended by an attorney wholly ignorant of the 
facts, and the reason governing an Executive officer in arriving 
at his conclusions in the case. 



It is with regret the Board of Equalization report a small 
decrease in the valuation of the real estate in a few towns ; 
while in the majority, and very great majority of towns, a 
large increase is exhibited. 

The total increase of the Grand List for the year 1864, over 
that of 1863, in real and personal estate, is seventeen millions 
six hundred and ninety-five thousand two hundred and ninety- 
nine dollars, and in Polls three hundred and eighty-nine thou- 
sand eight hundred and five dollars, a result which must be 
highly satisfactory to all. 

As was done last year, so now, I have thought it unadvisa- 
ble to attempt any estimate for grants, in anticipation of the 
action of the General Assembly, likewise for the amount which 
may be required by the Paymasters, Quarter-Master, and Ad- 
jutant Generals, in their several Departments. The amount 
drawn by the Paymaster-General during the last fiscal year, 
was three millions five hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 

Before the close of the present session, your Honorable 
Body may be in circumstances to form a much more correct 
conclusion, with reference to military expenses for the coming 
year, than I can possibly be at the present time. 

The following is an estimate of the Receipts into the Treas- 
ury for the year ending March 31st, A. D. 1865. 

Receipts. 

From Forfeited Bonds, . . . $8,000.00 
" Avails of Courts, . . . 2,000.00 
" Dividends on Bank Stocks, . 35,000.00 
" Tax on Banks, . . . 48,000.00 
" " o« Insurance Co.'s Stocks, 30,000.00 
" " on Associations and Incor- 
porations, . . . 60,000.00 
u "on Stock owned by Non- 
Residents, . . . 25,000.00 
" " on Agents of Foreign In- 
surance Companies, . 5,500.00 
' " " on Railroad Corporations, 200,000.00 



6 

•From Tax on Cash Capital of Mutual 

Insurance Companies, . $50,000.00 

" " on Deposits in Savings 

Banks, .... 210,000.00 

" " for Commutation, . . 60,000.00 

" " of four mills on the dollar 

on List of 1864, . 1,104,360.00 

" Miscellaneous sources, . . 2,000.00 

" Tax on Sales at Auction, . 1,000.00 

$1,840,860.00 

Estimated Expenditures. 

Debenture and Contingent Expenses 

of the General Assembly, . . $35,000.00 

Salaries, 24,000.00 

Contingent Expenses, including 
Grants, no estimate, . 

Expense of State Paupers, . . 1,500.00 
" of Superintending Common 

Schools, . . . 3,200.00 

Salary of Directors of the State 

Prison, 300.00 

Account Public Buildings and Insti- 
tutions, 28,000.00 

Interest on Bonds, .... 420.000.00 

Expense of Families of Volunteers, 
no estimate, 

Advances to Quarter-Master-General, 
no estimate, ..... 

Advances to Paymaster-General, no « 

estimate, 

Advances to Adjutant-General, no 
estimate, ..... 

Respectfully submitted, 

LEMAN W. CUTLER, Comptroller. 



ACCOUNTS, &C 



i¥o. 1. 

DEBENTURE AND CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF THE GENERAL 

ASSEMBLY. 

Session of 1864. 

1 Grant for Debenture of the Senate, $3,652.10 

1 " " " House of Rep- 

resentatives, 32,355.02 

$36,007.12 

11 rt Contingent Expenses of the 

Senate, 5,058.42 

15 " Contingent Expenses of the 

House of Representatives, 5,337.97 
14 " Contingent Expenses of the 

General Assembly, 7,828.72 

18,225.11 



$54,232.23 



NO. 2. 

ACCOUNT OF SALARIES PAID FROM 31st OF MARCH, 1864, TO 1st OF 

APRIL, 1865. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS. 

Orders in favor- of 

His Excellency Wm. A. Buckingham, for his 

Salary as Governor, $1,100.00 



8 

His Honor Roger Averill, for his Salary as 

Lieutenant-Governor, $300.00 

Honorable Gabriel W. Coite, for his Salary as 

Treasurer, 700.00 

Honorable J. Hammond Trumbull, for his 

Salary as Secretary, 1,000.00 

Honorable Leman W. Cutler, for his Salary 

as Comptroller, 1,000.00 



JUDICIAL OFFICERS. 

Orders in favor of 

Hon. Joel Hinman, Chief Judge of the Su- 
preme Court, 82,000.00 

Hon. Thos. B. Butler, Associate Judge of the 

Supreme Court, 2,000.00 

Hon. Henry Dutton, Associate Judge of the 

Supreme Court, 2,000.00 

Hon. J. D. Park, Associate Judge of the Su- 
preme Court, 2,000.00 

Hon. C. J. McCurdy, Associate Judge of the 

Supreme Court, 2,000.00 

Hon. Elisha Carpenter, Associate Judge of 

the Superior Court, 2,294.87 

Hon. James Phelps, Associate Judge of the 

Superior Court, 2,293.15 

Hon. D. W. Pardee, Associate Judge of the 

Superior Court, 2,293.15 

Hon. Dwight Loomis, Associate Judge of the 

Superior Court, 1,000 

John Hooker, Esq., Reporter of Judicial De- 
cisions, * 1,200.00 
John C. Day, Esq., Executive Secretary, 500.00 



$4,100.00 



17,881.17 



1,700.00 
823,681.17 



No. 3. 



ACCOUNT CONTINGENT EXPENSES OF GOVERNMENT FROM 31st OF 
MARCH, 1864, TO 1st OF APRIL, 1865. 



Order for F. P. Colton, for 1 month's services and 

expenses, $29.00 

" Town of Hartford, for error in payment of 

State tax, 400.00 

" R. A. Wheeler, Sheriif, for returning Votes 

from New London Co., 10.26 

" C. W. Snow, Sheriff, for returning Votes 

from Middlesex Co., 5.94 

" C. G. Child, for expenses of Executive 

office, 37.20 

" Bingham & Dodd, for Engraving for Treas- 
urer, 38.00 

a E. S. Day, Clerk, for Senate Journal, at ex- 
tra session, 231.85 

" H. L. Harrison, Clerk, for House Journal, at 

extra session, 234.25 

W. Russell, Sheriff, for Distributing Public 

Documents and expenses, 8.00 

u S. B. Meech, for services as Clerk for Gov. 

Buckingham, 83.33 

" Auditors Quarter-Master General's acc'ts, 

for services as Auditors, 20.00 

" Auditor's Public Accounts, for services as 

Auditors, 25.00 

" Hartford Water Works, for account rec'd 

for 6 months, 7.50 

" F. P. Colton, for account received for 1 

month and exp., 30.05 

" C. G. Child, for account for exp. as Execu- 
tive Secretary, 15.51 

" S. E. Elmore, for salary 3 months, 227.50 

Geo. Robinson, " * " 227.50 



10 

Order for C. J. Hoadley, for salary 3 months, $225,00 

Jos. Selden, for services as Clerk for Gov., 166.66 
Jas. P. Marsh, for salary 3 months, and 

expenses of Secretary's office, 298.11 

W. B. Peck, for cleaning State House at 

New Haven, 481.04 

John Hooker, for Connecticut Reports, 585.00 

J. M. Scofield & Co., for Printing Reports 

for General Assembly, 4,632.91 

State Teachers' Association, for first moiety 

of annual Grant, 125.00 

W. T. Cannon, for account for introducing 

Water into State House, N, EL, 100.00 

J. M. Scofield &. Co., for Printing Reports, 1,973.09 
Hartford City Gas Lt. Co., for account for 

3 months, 2.70 

Jeremiah Fowler, for services in Comptrol- 
ler's office, 88.00 
Day & Clark, for advertising Notice of 

Electors, 6.75 

Henry Fowler, for services in .Comptroller's 

office, 195.00 

F. P. Colton, for 1 mos. services and exp., 56.00 

Jos. Selden, for services as Clerk for Gov. 

Buckingham, 369.48 

Talcott & Post, for a State Flag, 120.50 

W. S. Bronson & Co., for account for work 

at State House, 24.81 

Wales Smith, for ringing bell for Legisla- 
ture at New Haven, 67.00 
L. W. Cutler, for expenses at New Haven, 213.27 
S. E. Elmore, for salary and expenses, 355 04 
J. H. Trumbull, for expenses at N. Haven, 196.98 
J. H. Trumbull, for expense of a Sword 

Case, 33.75 

Jas. P. Marsh, for exp. at New Haven, &c, 223.26 
Thompson <fc Hussey, for acc't rendered, 5.78 

W. A. Buckingham, for acc't rendered for 

expenses, 237.17 



11 

Order for Case, Lockwood & Co., for acc't rendered 

for offices, 1249.48 
44 G. W. Coite, Treasurer, for account ren'd 

for expenses, 196.94 
" State Library Committee, for Stillman & 

Parsons, for Binding Books, 99.13 

" R. Hoe & Co., for Seal Press for Secretary, 55.40 
14 H. J. Morse, for exp. in settlement of acc'ts 

with the TJ. S., 37.95 

u Talcott & Post, for acc't ren'd for offices, 60.45 

" C. J. Hoadley, for salary 3 months, 230.00 

" Jas. P. Marsh, u " and exp., 288.98 

" Geo. Robinson, " " 230.00 

" Fox & Woodford, for acc't ren'd for offices, 8.97 

" F. P. Colton, 1 mos. services and expenses, 33.00 
" Prescott May, Sheriff, for returning Votes, 

&c, Windham Co., 21.20 
" G. O. Hotchkiss, Sheriff, for returning Votes, 

&c, N. Haven Co., 40.30 

" Thos. Birch, for account rendered, 10.37 

" F. P. Colton, for 1 months' services, 25.00 
" E. Flower <fc Co., for account rendered for 

Coal for offices, 354.64 
" Jere. Fowler, for services in Comptroller's 

office, 94.00 

" Daily Post, for Printing for Secretary, 6.88 
" Henry Fowler, for services in Comptroller's 

office, 197.50 
" J. C. Day, for salary 6 months as Executive 

Secretary, 500.00 

" State Library Com'tee, for Books purchased, 46.63 
N. H. City Gas Lt. Co., for Gas for General 

Assembly, 16.81 
" Hartford Water Works, for acc't rendered 

for State House, 10.50 

" F. P. Colton, for 2 mos. services and exp., 53.00 

44 W. A. Buckingham, for acc't ren'd for exp., 238.93 
" Sidney Stanley, for services in Secretary's 

office, 57.50 



12 

Order for Jas. P. Marsh, for services as Clerk in Sec- 
retary's office and expenses, $276.47 
Geo. Robinson, for services as Clerk in 

Comptroller's office, 245.00 

" C. J. Hoadley, for services as Librarian, 230.00 

" G. W. Coite., Tr., for expense of issuing 

State Bonds, 1,838.29 

" M. B. Coite, for services as Clerk in Treas- 
urer's office, 265.00 

" J. B. Kirby, for Stand for Gas Fixtures in 

Governor's Room, 14.00 

" C. W. Snow, Sheriff, for returning Votes 

for Middlesex Co., 1 1.94 

** R. A. Wheeler, Sheriff, for returning Votes 

from N. London Co., 15.26 

" Mass. & KF. E. Life Ins. Cos., for Taxes 

erroneously p aid, 51.13 

" W. T. Elmer, Clerk, for exp. of Journal of 

House of Representatives, 734.25 

" M. B. Coite, for services in Treasurer's 

office, 40.00 

" State Teacher's Association, for 2d moiety 

of annual Grant, 125.00 

u Hartford City Gas Lt. Co., for acc't ren'd 

for 3 months, 4.56 

" Electors of President and V. President, for 

services as Electors and expenses, 104.26 

" Carrington & Hotchkiss, for Printing Pub- 
lic and Private Acts, 3,809.33 
1 Carrington & Hotchkiss, for Printing 

Journals, 1,728.20 

" Berkshire Life Ins. Co., for Tax erroneously 

paid, 64.45 

" Jeremiah Fowler, for services in Comptrol- 
ler's office, 130.00 

" Henry Fowler, for services in Comptroller's 

office, 197.50 

" J. R. Hawley & Co., for Advertising for 

Secretary and Librarian, 28.26 



13 



Order for F. P. Colton, for services as Messenger and 

Executive Messenger, $101.00 

" Day & Clark, for Daily Courant and Print- 
ing for offices, 19.00 

" Thompson & Hussey, for Work at State 

House, 10.88 

" Hartford Ice Co., for Ice for offices, 12.40 

" J. W. Arthur, for Repairs of Locks, &c, 3.65 

" H. L. Harrison, Clerk, for expense of Senate 

Journal, 907.20 

" G. M. Way & Co., for acc't received for 

sundries for offices, 16.77 

" Lewis Rowell, for acc't for Work in Treas- 
urer's office, 57.77 

" Case, Lockwood & Co., for acc't for Print- 
ing for offices, 556.71 

" Hubbard & McFarland, for Professional 

services, 413.50 

" Hartford Daily Post, for advertising No- 
tices, &c., 18.31 

" Geer & Pond, for Stationery, &c, for Comp- 
troller's office, 6.38 

" Mut. Life Ins. Co., N". Y., for Taxes errone- 
ously paid, 414.31 

" W. S. Bronson & Co., for repairs of Stoves 

and Work at State House, 79.87 

" Jas. P. Marsh, for 3 months' salary and exp. 

of Secretary's office, 292.33 

" Geo. Robinson, for 3 months' salary, 227.50 

" C. J. Hoadley, " " " 230.00 

" Stillman & Parsons, for acc't rendered for 

i Secretary and Treasurer, 87.04 

" Hudson Hollister, for acc't rendered for 

Charcoal for offices, 63.60 

" Timo. Sheldon, for Work at State House, 6.00 

" H. W. Hutchinson, for services in Treas- 
urer's office, 225.00 

" Town of Hartford, for Rent of Room in 

Halls of Record, 200.00 

" Hartf. City Gas Lt. Co., for Gas for offices, 4.18 



14 

1 Order for H. W. Hutchinson, for services in Treas- 
urer's office, - $45.00 

" State Library Com'tee, for Books purchased, 37.50 

" W. A. Buckingham, for expenses of Execu- 
tive Department, 153.51 

" Brown & Gross, for Stationery, &c, for 

offices, 2 years, 515.71 

" G. W. Coite, Treas., for acc't rendered for 

Fees paid Town Registrars, 35.00 

" C. J. Hoadley, for exp. as Librarian, 72.04 

" Geo. Robinson, for expenses of Comptrol- 
ler's office, 1 year, 362.66 

" Am. Telegraph Co., for account for Gov. 

Buckingham, .81 

" H. J. Morse, for services in settlement of 

account with TJ. S., 1,000.00 

" G. W. Coite, Treas., for expenses of Treas- 
urer's office, 552.31 

" G. W. Coite, Treas., for interest on Notes, 150,273.47 



$182,489.01 



Commissioners for Taking Soldiers' Votes. 
Orders for sundry Persons, for time and Exp. 

as Commissioners, 7,639.83 

HJxpense of Military Force. 
Orders for sundry Companies, for rent of Ar- 
mories, $2,973.81 

sundry Companies, for expense of 
Military Parades, 3,367.70 

Col. Almy, Asst. Q.-M.-Gen., for his 

salary to Aug. 31st, 1864, 750.18 

Am. Telegraph Co., for acc't ren'd 

for Gov. Buckingham, 22.43 

Lieuts. Parsons and Skinner, for 

services as Drill Masters, 156.30 

E. B. and E. C. Kellogg, for acc't 

rendered for Gov. Buckingham, 156.87" 



15 



Orders for Jos. Selden, Asst. A.-Gen., for acc't 

ren'd for salary, $388.50 

" L. E. Hunt, for acc't ren'd for Gov. 

Buckingham, , 6.13 

" Bingham & Dodd, for acc't ren'd 

for Gov. Buckingham, 21.00 

" Geer & Pond, for services ren'd for 

Gov. Buckingham, 21.28 

" Conn. Press, for Publishing General 

Orders, 94.00 

" Col. S. H. Perkins, for services as 

Instructor to 2d Regiment, 75.00 

" H. J. Morse, for expense of a Jour- 
ney to Washington, 59.05 



Account Printing Lams, &c. 
Orders for sundry Persons, for Printing Laws, 
&c, in Newspapers, 

Expense of School Libraries. 
Orders for Hon. D. N". Camp, S. of C. S., for 
sundry School Districts, 



$8,092.25 



1,948.70 



4 5.00 





Grants for Contingent Expenses*. 


1 Grant for E. E. Fitch, et. al, 


$200.00 


1 u 


Wright Park, 


55.00 


l " 


Lemuel Rowland, 


50.00 


1 u 


I. T. Hotchkiss & Sons, 


20.66 


-; u 


Mrs. M. G. Leonard, 


23.00 


1 " 


Henrietta Walker, 


75.00 


1 ll 


School Fund, 


6,186.10 


1 " 


Albert Sedgwick, 


250.00 


1 a 


Geo. Robinson, 


500.00 


1 " 


S. E. Elmore, 


300.00 


1 a 


Clerk of Treasurer, 


300.00 


1 " 


Clerk of Secretary, 


500.00 


1 " 


Gov. Buckingham, 


3,600.00 


1 " 


Committee, 


71.25 


1 a 


Gov. Buckingham, 


10.000 




amount of Contingent Expenses, 


°1 531 01 






Total 


$222,105.80 



16 
No 4. 

ACCOUNT JUDICIAL EXPENSES. 

For Orders Drawn by Clerks of Courts, and Registered by the 

Comptroller. 

HAKTFOED COUNTY. 

4 Orders by Chauncey Howard, Clerk, for 

Board of Prisoners, $5,014.83 

4 Orders by Chauncey Howard, Clerk, for 66 

Bills of Costs, 2,228.24 

5 Orders by Chauncey Howard, Clerk, for 

Balance of Jury Debenture, 893.86 

5 Orders by Chauncey Howard, Clerk, for At- 
tendance of Sheriff, &c, 1,137.72 

$9,274.65 

NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 

5 Orders by A. D. Osborne, Clerk, for Board 

of Prisoners, 7,190.54 

6 Orders by A. D. Osborne, Clerk, for 304 

Bills of Cost, 7,183.33 

5 Orders by A. D. Osborne, Clerk, for Balance 

of Jury Debenture, 1,732.83 

5 Orders by A. D. Osborne, Clerk, for Attend- 
ance of Sheriff, &c, 1,109.23 

17,215.93 

NEW LONDON COUNTY. 

4 Orders by W. L. Brewer, et. al, Clerk, for 

Board of Prisoners, 3,872.69 

4 Orders by TV. L. Brewer, et. al, Clerk, for 

130 Bills of Cost, 3,986.99 

4 Orders by TV. L. Brewer, et. al., Clerk, for 

Balance of Jury Debenture, 1,143.90 

4 Orders by TV. L. Brewer, et. al, Clerk, for 

Attendance of Sheriff, &c, 529.58 

9,533.16 



17 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 

7 Orders by E. S. Abemethy, Clerk, for Board 

of Prisoners, $1,491.46 

4 Orders by E. S. Abemethy, Clerk, for 116 

Bills of Cost, 6,393.74 

4 Orders 1 by E. S. Abemethy, Clerk, for Bal- 

ance of Jury Debenture, 1,709.10 

5 Orders by E. S. Abemethy, Glerk, for At- 

tendance of Sheriff, &c, 649.55 

10,243.85 

WINDHAM COUNTY. 

4 Orders by Uriel Fuller, Clerk, for Board of 

Prisoners, 348.71 

4 Orders by Uriel Fuller, Clerk, for 48 Bills 

of Cost, 640.36 

4 Orders by Uriel Fuller, Clerk, for Balance 

of Jury Debenture, 566.71 

1,555.78 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 

4 Orders by W. L. Ransom, Clerk, for Board 

of Prisoners, 1,497.72 

4 Orders by W. L. Ransom, Clerk, for 63 Bills 

of Cost, 2,335.19 

4 Orders by W. L. Ransom, Clerk, for Balance 

of Jury Debenture, 704.86 

•5 Orders by W. L. Ransom, Clerk, for Attend- 
ance of Sheriff &c, 431.10 



4,968.87 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



5 Orders by W. P. Vinal, Clerk, for Board of 

Prisoners, 1,941.71 

5 Orders byW. P. Vinal, Clerk, for 68 Bills 

of Cost, 1,334.02 



18 

5 Orders by W. P. Yinal, Clerk, for Balance 

of Jury Debenture, £1,018.06 

4 Orders by VV. P. Vinal, Clerk, for Attend- 
ance of Sheriff! &c, 2 77.84 

$4,571.63 

TOLLAND COUNTY. 

3 Orders by Joseph Bishop, Clerk, for Board 

of Prisoners, 238.47 

3 Orders by Joseph Bishop, Clerk, for 27 Bills 

of Cost, 1,105.77 

3 Orders by Joseph Bishop, Clerk, for Balance 

of Jury Debenture, 758,14 

2 Orders by Joseph Bishop, Clerk, for Attend- 
ance of Sheriff <fcc, 289.50 



2,391.8$ 



Deficiency in Avails of Courts. 
1 Order by Uriel Fuller, Clerk, for Deficieney 

in Avails of Windham Superior Court, 15.39 
1 Order by Joseph Bishop, Clerk, for Deficiency 

in Avails of Tolland Superior Court, 48.47 

1 Order by W. L. Brewer, Clerk, for Deficiency 

in Avails of Xew London Superior Ct.. 9.69 



tS.o-'y 



Trustees of the State Reform ScTiool. 
4 Orders by E. W. Hatch, Superintendent, 

for Board Bills. 16,291.20 

4 Orders by Trustees, for Expenses. 131.55 

1 Grant by General Assembly, for repairing 

Fence and purchase of Land. 1,000.00 

17,422.65 

Connecticut State Pr^ 

1 Order for Directors for Deficiency in Avails 

of the Prison, 4.012.68 

1 Order for Directors for Deficiency in Avails 

of the Prison, 2,500.00 

6,512.68 



19 



Extra Payments for Board of Prisoners after July 4th, 1863. 
1 Order for Commissioners Fairfield County, 

for Bridgeport Jail, ' $316.49 

1 Order for Commissioners Windham County, 124.51 

8441.00 



Total amount of Judicial Expenses, $84,205.63 



]\ T o. 5. 

EXPENSE OF SUPPORTING THE STATE PAUPERS. 
2 Orders for W. F. Clark, for his yearly compensation, $1,500.00 



IXo. 6. 

EXPENSE OF SUPERINTENDING COMMON SCHOOLS. 

4 Orders for D. N. Camp, Superintendent, for 

salaries and expenses, 2,449.9V 

5 Orders for D. N Camp, Superintendent, for 

Teachers' Institutes and Lectures, 983.50 

3,433.47 



No. 7. 

DIRECTORS- OF THE CONNECTICUT STATE PRISON. 
1 Order for the salary of the Directors, 300.00 



No. 8. 

ACCOUNT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND INSTITUTIONS. 
ASYLUM FOE THE DEAF" AND DUMB. 

1 Grant for the Asylum for Indigent Pupils, 4,000.00 



20 

RETREAT FOR THE INSANE. 

1 Grant for Support of Indigent Patients, $15,000.00 

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES. 

10 Grants for County and other Societies, 1,360.00 

TRUSTEES OF THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

1 Grant for the benefit of said School, 5,000.00 

LAKEVILLE INSTITUTE. 

1 Grant for the 'education of Indigent Idiots, 3,000.00 



28,360.00 



No. 9. 

EXPENSE OF SOLDIERS' FAMILIES. 
Orders for Treasurers of Towns, 689.516.73 



No. 10. 

ADVANCES MADE TO THE QUARTER-MASTER-GENERAL 

Orders for Wm. A. Aiken, Quarter-Master- 
General, for expenses, 25,350.00 



Wo. 11. 

ADVANCES TO THE PAYMASTER-GENERAL. 
Orders for Wm. Fitch, Paymaster-General, 3,550,000.00 



21 



Xo. 12. 

ADVANCES TO THE ADJUTANT-GENERAL, 
Orders for H. J. Morse, Adj.-General, for expenses, 823,000.00 



22 

Dr. General Account of Receipts and Expenditure* of Funds 

For Payments from the Treasury from March 31^,1864, to April 
1st, 1865, for the Current "Expenses of Government, as per pre- 
ceding Accounts, number in >j from 1 to 12, under the follotciny 
heads, viz: 

Account No. 1, Debenture and Contingent 

Expenses of the General Assembly, $54,232.23 

Account Xo. 2, x\ccount of Salaries, 23,681.1V 

Account No. 3, Contingent Expenses, in- 
cluding Grants, 222,105.80 

Account Xo. 4, Judicial Expenses, in- 
cluding Grants, 84,205.33 

Account Xo. 5, Expense of Supporting 

the State Paupers, 1,500.00 

Account Xo. 6, Expense of Superintend- 
ing Common Schools, 3,433.47 

Account Xo. 7, Salary of Directors of 

the State Prison, 300.00 

Account Xo. 8, Account of Public Build- 
ings and Institutions, 28,360.00 

Account Xo. 9, Expense of Families of 

Volunteers, 689,516.73 

Account No. 10, Advances to the Quar- 
ter-Master-General, 25,350.00 

Account Xo. 11, Advances to the Pay- 
master-General, 3,550,000.00 

Account Xo. 12, Advances to the Adju- 
tant-General, 23,000.00 

4,705,685.03 

Interest on State Bonds, 358,653.00 

Balance to Xew Account, 3,428.16 



$5,067,766.19 



23 



appropriated for the Current Expenses of Government. Cb. 

By Payments into the Treasury, from Z\st of March, 1864, to 
1st of April, 1865. 

FRO^I FORFEITED BONDS, ETC. 

By Cash of Daniel Chad wick, State's Attor- 
ney, New London County, 81,091.72 

By Cash of J. H. Brockway, State's Attor- 
ney, Tolland County, 56.50 

By Cash of R. D. Hubbard, State's Attorney, 

Hartford County, 3,452.12 

By Cash of C. F. Sedgwick, State's Attorney, 

Litchfield County, 297.02 

By Cash of G. W. Phillips, State's Attorney, 

Windham County, 140.00 

By Cash of J. M. Carter, State's Attorney, 

Fairfield County, 1,600.27 

By Cash of W. T. Elmore, State's Attorney, 

Middlesex County, 277.88 

By Cash of E. K. Foster, State's Attorney, 

New Haven County, 1,000. 



$7,916.09 



FROAI AVAILS OF COURTS. 

By Cash of W. P. Vinal, Clerk, for avails of 

Middlesex Superior Court, 41.29 

By Cash of W. L. Ransom, Clerk, for avails 

of Litchfield Superior Court, 236.25 

By Cash of Robert Coit, Jr., Clerk, for avails 

of New London Superior Court, 342.70 

By^Cash of A. D. Osborne, Clerk, for avails 

of New Haven Superior Court, 787.84 

By Cash of E. S. Abernethy, Clerk, for avails 

of Fairfield Superior Court, 233.83 

By Cash of Chauncey Howard,* Clerk, for 

avails of Hartford Superior Court, 295.26 



1,937.17 



Amount carried forward, 9,853.26 



24 

Dr. General Account of Receipt* and Expenditures of Funds 

Amount brought forward, $5,067,766.19 



$5,067,766.19 



25 

appropriated to the Current Expenses of Government. Cr. 

By Amount brought forward, $9,853.26 
By Cash for taxes from Towns, including Commuta- 
tion tax, 1,073,277.75 
By Cash for tax from Railroad Corporations, 199,735.00 
By Cash for tax from Banks, 46,784.84 
By Cash for tax on Bank Stocks, owned by Non-Resi- 

dents, 9,339.26 

By Cash for tax on Insurance Companies' Stock, 28,297.00 
By Cash for tax on Cash Capital of Mutual Insurance 

Companies, 49,060.22 
By Cash for tax on Insurance Stock, owned by Non- 
Residents, 14,693.41 
By Cash for tax from Agents of Foreign Insurance 

Companies, 5,401.16 

By Cash for tax from Savings Banks and S. B. and » 

B. Associations, 204,645.53 

By Cash for tax from Associations and Incorporations, 57,743.29 
By Cash for tax from Turnpike and Bridge Co.'s, 

Non-Residents, 92.70 

By Cash for tax on Sales at Auction, 729.43 
By Cash Dividends on Bank Stocks owned by the State, 34,034.00 

By Cash from Miscellaneous Sources, 2,253.13 

By Cash for Temporary Loans, 1,273,453.79 

By Cash from Sale of State Bonds, 2,000,000.00 

By Cash for Premium on State Bonds, 8,598.38 

By Balance of Account, April 1st, 1864, 49,774.04 



$5,067,766.19 
1865. 
April 1, By Balance of Account, $3,428.16 



26 

Dr. The State of Connecticut, in General Account of Orders on the Treasurer from 

3 Orders for Albert Sedgwick, Commis- 
sioner, for Salary and Expenses, $1,747.25 
2 Orders for G. W. Coite, Treasurer, t for 

Salary, 300.00 

2,047.25 

ACCOUNT APPROPRIATION FOR THE SUPPORT 
OF SCHOOLS. 

For 145 Orders in favor of Towns, &c, 
drawn by the Comptroller on the Treas- 
urer from March 31st, 1864, to April 1st, 
1865, 136,571.25 

$138,619.50 






27 

March Zlst, 1864, to April Zlst, 1865, payable from the School Fund. Cr. 

By amount of Orders drawn by the Comptroller on 
the Treasurer, and paid by him from interest on 
the School Fund, from the 31st of March, 1864, to 
1st of April, 1865, as per Comptroller's Accounts 
and Auditor's Report, $138,619.50 



$138,619.50 



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REPORT 



COMMISSIONER 



OF THE 



SCHOOL FUND, 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 



MAY SESSION, 1865. 



irinttfr bs ©rto at % f tgislsta. 



NEW HAVEN: 
CARRINGTON & HOTCHKISS, STATE PRINTERS. 

1865. 



REPORT. 



To the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, to be 
holden at Hartford on the first Wednesday of May, A. D. 
1865 :r 

The Commissioner of the School Fund reports : 

That the duties of the office have occupied the careful atten- 
tion of the Commissioner, and of those who assisted him in 
the administration of the affairs of the School Fund during 
the past year, and the report now presented, with the acompa- 
nying tables, will show the result of their labors. 

Large amounts of the principal of the Fund have been paid 
in and placed in other safe investments. The loan due from 
the State Prison, to which allusion has been made in former 
reports, has been paid in full. The usual prompt payment of 
interest, which furnish the revenue of the Fund, have been 
made, and the usual dividends declared, and the aid thus af- 
forded to our Common Schools have reached every district in 
the State. The vast operations required to manage the affairs 
of the nation, and the great changes which recent events have 
worked in the finances of the State, have in no degree impair- 
ed the integrity of this Fund, and through all the perilous 
vicissitudes of the great struggle in which the Nation has of 
late been involved, it has diffused its munificence and imparted 
its aid to the people of the State. 

On the second day of September, A. D. 1864, the Auditors 
of Public Accounts, after a thorough and minute examination 
of the condition of the Fund, found that the principal from 
which the revenue is derived amounted to §2,046,532.23. In 



1853, the same board ascertained the principal to amount to 
$2,046,784.19. .More than one-sixth part of the Fund, as then 
existing, consisted of lands belonging to it, some wild and 
some cultivated, and of money due for lands contracted to be 
sold. A large portion of these lands has been disposed of, and 
the avails thus become productive ; and the contracts then ex- 
isting have nearly all been fulfilled, and the result shows the 
great accuracy of the value of the lands and other securities 
as made in 1S53, there being but a small fractional difference 
in the amount of the Fund, as established at the two different 
and distinct periods. 

If the transferable Bank Stock now owned by the Fund 
should be sold at its market value, it would add a considerable 
sum to the amount of it as now existing. 

The amount of principal paid into the Treasury during the 
year was $294,988.75 ; of this sum there has been reinvested 
in bond and mortgage securities $294,191.61. Leaving a bal- 
ance in the Treasury for future investment $4,797.14. 

The most difficult part of the Commissioner's duty consists 
in the investment of the moneys thus constantly accumulating 
by the payment by debtors of the sums due on the principal. 
None of the loans are very large, and some are very small, 
and they are scattered in sections of several States. To know 
that the securities are all good, and to see that the interest is 
promptly paid, requires constant care and labor. 

The amount of revenue from the Fund for the last year was 
$143,556.49. 

The amount paid on orders for dividends to the School Dis- 
tricts, and for the expenses of the management of the Fund, 
was $138,619.51 ; and there was a balance in the Treasury on 
the 1st of April last of $29,116.51. Some addition has been 
made to the expenses of taking care of the Fund, by the in- 
creased charges made by agents, and by increased taxation, in- 
surance renewals, and other incidental expenses. 

The number of children between the ages of four and six- 
teen years returned to the Comptroller of Public Accounts in 
January last, was 114,825, being an increase over the number 
returned last year of 2,727. For each child thus returned 



there has been ordered to be paid to the several Districts in 
the State the sum of one dollar and fifteen cents each. A 
considerable proportion of the children in whose behalf such 
dividend was ordered, give no attendance upon our Common 
Schools, and are in no way benefited by its payment. Many 
attend select private schools, and many more attend no schools 
at all, for the want of the necessary accommodations and 
room, and are thus deprived of the advantages which the in- 
come of the School Fund was intended to furnish them through 
the medium of Common School instruction. This is the case 
to a great extent in our cities and large towns. They receive 
large sums of money, which, as the law now is, cannot be ap- 
plied for the benefit of those for whom it is intended, and to 
that extent deprives other portions of the State of what is 
justly their due. It seems to the undersigned that the true 
way is, to divide the money to the Districts in proportion to 
the actual attendance of the children in the schools. A proper 
degree of care on the part of the teachers, and a proper 
amount of vigilance on the part of the District Committees in 
keeping, and perhaps in some respects improving the registers 
now required, would insure a good degree* of accuracy and 
uniformity in the statement of the actual attendance of the 
children upon the schools, ensure a fair and equal distribution 
of the avails of the School Fund, for the benefit of those chil- 
dren for whose aid it was intended. The attention of the Le- 
gislature is respectfully invited to a consideration of this 
subject. 

The determination of several of our Banking institutions to 
become National Banking Associations under the law of Con- 
gress, have made very little change in their relations to the 
School Fund. The moneys of the Fund, which constituted a 
part of the capital stock of several of them, still remain with 
them, except in one instance, where a bank has been permitted 
to dissolve its connection with the School Fund by paying into 
the Treasury the amount which it held as a part- of its^tock. 
By the 8th section of the Act approved May session, 1864, the 
duty of withdrawing the funds of the State from such banks 



6 

devolves, in certain contingencies, upon the Treasurer, and is 
no part of the duty of the Commissioner of the School Fund. 

By an Act of Congress, approved July 2d, 1861, this State 
received a donation of 180,000 acres of public lands, if it 
should provide a College for the benefit of Agriculture and 
the Mechanic Arts. The Corporation of Yale College under- 
took to carry out the intent of the Act of Congress above re- 
ferred to, and upon such undertaking it was made the duty of 
the Commissioner of the School Fund to collect and pay over 
the interest of the fund arising from the sale of the lands thus 
received from Congress, to the Corporation of the College. 
The scrip for the land was sold in May, 1864, for $135,000, 
being at the rate of seventy-five cents per acre of the land. 
The money received for the sale of the scrip was invested in 
the Government securities known as Ten-Forty Bonds, and the 
amount of interest .received from such investment is $13,233.- 
05, which has been paid over to the Treasurer of the College. 

The accompanying tables illustrate the condition of the 
Fund, and its management in all particulars, and to them 
reference is had as follows : 

1st. An abstract of the schedule of the property constitu- 
ting the principal of the Fund, September 2d, 1864, certified 
by the Auditors of Public Accounts. 

2d. Statement of the property constituting the capital of 
the Agricultural College Fund, on the 15th of April, 1865, 
certified by the Auditors of Public Accounts. 

3d. The Treasurer's statement of receipts and disbursements 
of revenue for the fiscal year ending March 31st, 1863. 

4th. The Treasurer's statement of receipts and disbursements 
of principal for the fiscal year. 

5th. A statement of the amount of revenue actually received 
at the treasury from all sources, the disbursements for divi- 
dend to schools, salaries and expenses, the rate of dividend per 
capita, and the amount of surplus revenue at the close of each 
fiscal year, from 1825 to 1865, inclusive. 

0th. Statement showing the amount of dividends received 
from each bank from April 1st, 1864, to March 31st, 1865. 

7th. Statement of the number of children between four and 



sixteen years of age, in each School Society, in the year end- 
ing March 31st, 1865, apportioned by the Comptroller accord- 
ing to such enumerations, with the increase and decrease of 
such children in each society in one year. 

8th. Table showing the enumeration of children in the sev- 
eral School Districts, taken January, A. D. 1865, together 
with the amount drawn by each District. 

9»fch. A statement of reinvestment of principal, for year end- 
ing March 31st, 1865. 

10th. A list of debtors in arrears or interest payably at the 
Treasury, September 2d, 1864. 

ALBEET SEDGWICK, 
Commissioner of the School Fund. 

School Fund Office, ) 

Hartford, April 21st, 1865. j 



No. 1. 

Abstract of the Schedule of Property and Securities belonging to 
and constituting the Capital of the School Fund of Connecticut, 
on the second day of September, A. D. 1864, as prepjared by the 
Commissioner of said Fund, and by us audited and examined, 
and each item thereof compared with documents and vouchers in 
the office of said Commissioner. 

IN BANK STOCK. 

In eighteen Banks, . . . . , . $268,900.00 

IN CONTRACTS, BONDS AND MORTGAGES. 

Against individuals residing in Connecticut, . 1,312,531.81 

" " " Massachusetts, . 89,524.20 

" " " New York,; . 32.8,222.56 

" Ohio, . . . 21,373.54 



H 



IN CASH. 

In hands of Treasurer and Agents, 

IN WILD LANDS. 

In the State of Connecticut, . . . 400.00 

" " Wisconsin, . . . 2,500.00 



82,046,532.23 



HENRY K. W. WELCH, ) Auditors of 
CHARLES BOSWELL, j Public Accounts. 



No. 2. 

We, the undersigned Auditors of Public Accounts, having examined 
the U. S. 10.40 Bonds in the Office of the^Commissioner of the School 
Fund, composing the Capital of the Agricultural College Fund, and 
compared the same with the following statement, do find the same 
correct : 



ft0,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,00.0 

10,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 



1 Registered Bond, 


No. 


1,856, 


1 " 


a 


a 


1,461, 


1 u 


a 


u 


1,462, 


1 u 


u 


a 


410, 


1 ii 


u 


a 


309, 


-i u 


a 


« 


310, 


1 " 


it 


a 


311, 


1 " 


ci 


u 


312, 


1 " 


a 


u 


313, 


1 u 


a 


u 


314, 


1 u 


K 


a 


438, 


1 " 


a 


u 


439, 


1 " 


a 


a 


440, 


1 u 


(C 


« 


441, 


1 M 


u 


(i 


408, 


1 a 


a 


« 


419, 


1 Coupon 


it 


a 


31,184, 


1 u 


u 


u 


31,185, 



$135,000 



HENRY K. W. WELCH, ) Auditors of 
CHARLES BOSWELL, f Public Accounts. 



Hartford, April ISth, 1865. 



10 



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j2» 


-m -n -m -m -' -^ •-: •-: s; r. :: 1- .- r. — -.: :-. 1- / 1- 1- ~ ■. .-. ■- -~ ■- r. -m :* — ~ — - -n ~~ = 

i-t-t- 1- t-t—t-t- ao t- x <x si s-. s r — ■ — — — -ri "m t: K - ' X X — ■:• :'. — — :: 00 W« X '■'■ X 


^ ^^^^r-.^^^^.^^^^^,., __ 


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"3 a. 


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-" 


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1 j) 

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Bal'nce on 
inclu'd. rev 

called in en 

$8,141 
non 
12,853 
1 3,582 
19,256 
15,213, 
12,534. 
19,615 
17,984 
81,480, 
44,462 
35,463. 
58,460. 
55,707. 
44,100, 
46,988, 
43,885, 
25,261. 
29,760. 
25,904. 
22,886. 
25,429. 
18,242. 

12,962, 
9,420. 

in 1 1 : 
14,980. 
12,110. 
19,681, 
81,706. 
81,086, 

3(1,393, 
28,849. 
21,894 

26,998. 

27,880, 
29,110. 


1 3 


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13 



No. 6. 

Statement showing the amount of Dividends received from each Bank from 
April 1st, 1864, to March Zlst, 1865, inclusivee. 



NAME OP BANK. 



Hartford Bank, 

Farmers and Mechanics Bank 

State Bank 

City Bank 

Fairfield County Bank 

Few Haven Bank 

AVaterbury Bank 

~New London Bank 

Whaling Bank, 

]STor\< ich Bank 

Thames Bank 

Bridgeport Bank 

Middletown Bank 

Middlesex County Bank 

Danbury Bank 

Connecticut Bank 

Stonington Bank 

Stafford Bank 



Amount of 


Amount of 


Stock. 


Dividend. 


$6,800 


$6,800.00 


30,100 


2,408.00 • 


30,000 


3,000.00 


15,000 


1,200.00 


10,900 


1,417.00 


10,000 


1,155.00 


10,000 


800.00 


10,000 


.1,200.00 


10,000 


1,000.00 


10,000 


1,100.00 


10,000 


941.67 


10,000 


1,000.00 ' 


10,000 


1,000.00 


10,000 


1,000.00 


8,500 


765.00 


6,400 


576.00 


5,000 


500.00 


. 5,000 


350.00 


$268,900 


$26,212.67 



14 



SCII ED ULE of the number of Children between Four and 
Sixteen years of agi '<■■ v . y to the 

enumeration m the month of January, A.D. 1865, and the divi- 

Js of School Money modi to > '• tht yt • 

March 31.<tf, 1865, apportioned by the Comptroller accord/'/'!/ to 
each inline r 4th the In -iseof each chil- 

di\/t in each Society in one year, 

HARTFORD COUXTY. 



Name of each School Society. 


z d 
%s 

-2 - 

a .a 
go 

10 
6 
9 
9 
13 
9 
9 
10 
6 

12 

14 

11 

17 

10 

9 

9 

4 

6 

4 

12 

11 
10 
11 

8 
10 
10 

2 


c d 

u « 

,22 

p 

6,965 
238 
511 
327 
909 
339 
651 
690 
220 

1.522 
915 
823 
414 
197 

m 

133 
1,428 
236 
667 
894 
371 

352 
530 
515 

476 


Amount of 
1 dividend 

nt $1 . L6 

pro lata. 


[ooreasfi of 

< liildren. 


o . 

- i, 

- " 


Hartford 

Avon 


■9.75 
273. 70 
5ST 
.05 

1,045.35 
8S9.S5 
748.65 
793.50 
253.00 
79' 

1.750.30 

1,052 - 
946.45 
476.10 
226.55 
892.40 
152.95 

1,042.20 

"271.40 

7.05 

1,028.10 
426.65 
- . 05 
404.80 
609 . 50 
1 . 25 
547.40 


156 

68 
25 
29 
33 
24 

59 

154 

16 

68 
14 

21 

99 
4 

15 

44 

7 

10 


3 

14 


Berlin 

Bloomfield 

Bristol 


■> 


Burlington. 

Canton 

East Hartford : 




Eaet Granby 

East Windsor 


20 


♦Enfield 

Farmington 

Glastenbury 

Granbv 

Hartland 


I 
6 


Manchester • 

Marlborough 

New Britain 




Rocky Hill 

Simsbury 

Southington 

South Windsor 

Suffield 

West Hartford 

tWetbarofield 

Windsor 


13 


Windsor Locks 


I 








251 


22,593 


|26,981. »6 


846 


79 



• 93 Deducted in this Town by Comptroller, 
f 20 Added 



15 



NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



Name of each School Society. 



New Haven. . . 

*Branford 

f Bethany 

Cheshire , 

Derby 

East Haven 

Guilford 

JHamden. . /.. 

Madison 

§Meriden 

Middlebury . . . 

Milford 

Naugatuck. . . . 
North Branford 
North Haven. . , 

Orange 

|Oxford , 

Prospect 

Seymour 

Southbury 

Wallingford . . . 
^[ Waterbury . . 
**Woodbridge . 
Wolcott 



fe.2 


° a 


unt o 

idend 

$1.15 

rata. 


o • 

a 


Is 


g 00 


|2 


a-stii. 


|6 




3 


9,511 


$10,937.65 


418 




8 


698 


687.70 


34 




8 


286 


328.90 


69 




12 


555 


638.25 


16 




6 


1,533 


1,762.95 




24 


8 


592 


680.80 


47 




15 


516 


593.40 


8 




13 


658 


756.70 


12 




13 


463 


532.45 




30 


18 


1,675 


1,926.25 


137 




6 


125 


143.75 




6 


12 


638 


733.70 




6 


6 


688 


791.20 


40 




7 


283 


325.45 


17 




8 


341 


392.15 




14 


7 


510 


586.50 


61 




13 


273 


313.95 


4 




5 


160 


184.00 


12 




6 


460 


529.00 


44 




9 


265 


304.75 


4 




10 


768 


883.20 


50 




11 


2,994 


3,443.10 


190 




5 


187 


215.05 


6 




6 


118 


135.70 




10 


210 


24,197 


$27,826.55 


1,169 


90 



* 88 Deducted in this Town by Comptroller. 

t 7 

+ 8 " " " " 

§ 29 " " 

5 « u « 

i 13 " " " «» 

** g « <« u « 



16 



NEW LONDON COUNTY. 



Name of each School Society, 



New London 

Bozrah 

Colchester 

East Lyme 

•Franklin 

Griswold 

Groton 

Lebanon 

Ledyard 

Lisbon 

Lyme 

Montville , 

Norwich , 

North Stonington 

f Preston 

Salem 

Sprague 

Stonington 

Old Lyme 

"Waterford 





° a 

u ? 


7 

7 

15 

9 


2,388 
221 
640 
385 


8 


205 


14 


517 


11 
16 
14 


1,289 
458 
371 


10 
7 
13 
12 
15 


184 
327 
587 
3,512 
442 


12 


517 


8 


202 


4 


575 


19 

8 


1,591 
333 


> 11 


679 


220 


15,423 



°-0>0 05 



B«q 






$2,746 
254, 
736 
442, 
235, 
594, 

1,482, 
526. 
426, 
211. 
376, 
675, 

4,038, 
508, 
594. 
232, 
661. 

1,829. 
382. 
780. 



= 



817,736.45 



34 
3 

25 

4 

35 

37 

1 

13 

11 

20 

143 



326 






9 
27 
64 



18 



19 
15 

161 



* 14 Deducted in this Town by Comptroller, 
f 15 



17 



FAIEFIELD COUNTY. 



Name of each School Society. 


93 

U O 

X "22 


Number of 
Children. 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


1 * g 

CO - 

gg 


3 -j 


Fairfield 


17 

13 

5 

10 

9 

4 

10 

21 

12 

7 

11 

7 

20 

11 

10 

15 

7 

15 

8 

7 

7 

10 

11 


i 1,248 

! 1,941 

357 

3,372 

260 

436 

264 « 

1,844 

318 

285 

666 

225 

914 

2.048 

3S6 

559 

211 

1,904 

474 

280 

282 

804 

517 


$,435.20 

2,232.15 
410.55 

3,877.80 
299.00 
501.40 
303.60 

2,120.60 
365.70 
327.75 
765.90 
258.75 

1,051.10 

2,355.20 
443.90 
642.85 
242.65 

2,189.60 
545.10 
322.00 
324.30 
924.60 
594.55 


51 
230 

i 

53 
31 
18 

8 

71 

161 

10 

33 

51 


30 


Danbury 




Bethel 




*BridiieDort 




Brookfield 




Darien 




Easton 


21 


Greenwich 




f Huntington 




Monroe 




New Canaan 


22 


New Fairfield 




Newtown 




Nor walk 




Jlleddinij 




§Ridgefield 




Sherman 


25 


Stamford 




Stratford 


16 


| Trumbull 


12 


Weston 


5 


Westport 

Wilton 


2 

8 








246 


19,595 


$22,534.25 


726 


142 



* 58 Deducted in this Town by Comptroller. 

t 7. ' 

+ 22 «< « « m 

§ 20 

| 5 " " M " 



18 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 



Name of each School Society. 



•Litchfield 

Barkhamsted. , 

Bethlera 

Bridge water. 

•{■Canaan 

Colebrook 

Cornwall 

Goshen 

Harwinton. . . , 

Kent 

Morris 

New Hartford. 
New Mil ford. , 

Norfolk , 

North Canaan 
Plymouth. . . 

Roxbury 

Salisbury 

Sharon 

Torriugton.. . . 

\ Warren 

Wat or town. . . 
Winchester. . . 
Woodbury . . . 
Washington. . 



Number of 
Districts. 


c . 
t. 55 

£•= 


■ 
22 


754 


10 


251 


8 


188 


5 


306 


10 


414 


10 


344 


17 


544 


12 


344 


12 


304 


14 


484 


6 


189 


10 


623 


20 


852 


13 


414 


5 


366 


14 


911 


8 


227 


14 


882 


18 


719 


11 


611 


8 


202 


9 


375 


10 


780 


14 


444 


12 


384 


292 


11,907 



■J. — 

~ -— 



c z. - ~ 



$867.10 

288.65 
210.46 

351.90 
476.10 
899.05 

625.60 
395 . 60 
349.60 
556.60 
217.35 
716.45 
979.80 
476 10 
417.45 

1,047.65 
261 05 

1,014.30 
826 85 
702.66 
232.40 
431.25 
897.00 
510.60 
441 60 

$13,693.05 



41 



20 

32 

2 

20 

25 

48 

38 
40 
27 
9 
8 
17 



875 



<D § 






89 



82 

8 

7 



26 



10 Deducted by Comptroller in this Town. 

20 

48 



26 Added. 






19 



WINDHAM COUXTY. 



Name of each School Society. 


•1 


o « 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


© s 


Cm 

° a 

• <» 

CO M 

■s2 




9 
10 
12 
7 
8 
7 

18 

15 

10 

7 

9 

13 

10 

11 

17 

7 


466 
333 
396 
184 
298 
225 

1,146 
880 
324 
684 
267 
773 
330 

1,095 
789 
160 


8535.90 
382.95 
455.40 
211.60 
342.70 
258.75 

1,317.90 

1,012.00 
372.60 
786.60 
307.05 
88S.95 
379.50 

1,259.25 
907.35 
184.00 


26 

16 
22 
35 

8 
5 




Ash ford 


4 


Canterbury 


46 


f Chaplin , 




Eastford 


8 


Hampton 


iKillinglv 

§Plainfieid ,. 


31 


JjPomfret 


15 


Putnam 

Sterling 


32 

13 


Thompson 


39 
24 


Voluntown 


Windham 


71 


Woodstock 

Scotland 








169 


8,350 


1 S9.602.50 


112 


. 273 



* 15 Deducted in this Town by Comptroller. 

f 16 « 

% 21 

§ 10 " " M M 

| 1 - 



20 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



Name of each School Society. 


O . 

33 

E.2 
! G 

21 
14 
12 
4 
6 
5 
6 

6 

I 
\ 

7 


1° 


Amount of 

Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


o • 

a 
© » 

8-3 

a — 
■- s 


50 


Middletown 


2,3S8 
476 
461 
238 
344 
449 
267 
745 
359 
19S 
270 
253 

1,003 
239 


2.746.20 
547.40 
530.15 
273.70 
395.60 
516.35 
307.05 
856.75 
412.85 
2i7.70 
310.50 
290.95 

1,153.45 
274.85 


28 

4 
16 
18 

4 
10 




Haddam 


29 


Chatham 


6 


Chester 




Clinton 


4 


Cromwell 




Durham 

East Haddam 


3 


Essex 


2 


Killingworth 

Old Say brook 


16 


Savbrook 


1 


Portland 

Westbrook •.... 


6 




121 


i 7,690 


$8,843.50 


80 


67 



21 



TOLLAND COUISTTY. 



Name of each School Society. 



•Tolland.. 
Andover. . 

Bolton 

Columbia. 
Coventry. , 
Ellington. 
Hebron . . . 
Mansfield . 
Somers. . . 
Stafford.. 
Union. . . . 
Vernon. . . 
Wellington 



Number of 
Districts. 




12 


316 


4 


101 


5 


165 


7 


223 


10 


491 


9 


362 


11 


325 


16 


479 


10 


357 


18 


779 


6 


166 


8 
9 


1,047 
260 


125 


5,070 



■•J <i> . SI 

° £ *= ° 



363.40 
116.15 
189.75 
256.45 
564.65 
416.30 
373.75 
550.85 
410.55 
895.85 
190.90 
1,292.90 
299.00 



° ri 

CO t. 
ID j-H 



$5,830.50 



6 
28 
19 

2 



1 

26 



48 
7 



142 



102! 



* 8 Added in this Town by Comptroller. 
\ 22 Deducted 



22 

No. 8. 



HARTFOED COUNTY. 

Table, showing the enumeration of Children in the several 
School Districts, taken January, A. D. 1865, together with 
the amount drawn by each District. 



Hartford. 


-E — 
- •- 

1° 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


Bloomfield, continued. 
4 
North East 


I" 3 " 

30 
22 
13 


Amount of 
Dividend 
nt $1.15 
pro rata. 


Fir?t 


2279 

1987 

1182 

6<»5 

548 

120 

103 

53 

59 

34 


$2,620,851 

2.285.05 

1.359.30S 

695.75! 

624.45 

138.00, 

118.45' 

60.95 

67.85^ 

39.10 


$34.50 


South 

Second North 


Scotland North 

South 

Bristol. 

No. 1 

•• 2 


25.30 
14.95 






West Middle 


327 

113 

52 
245 

108 
55 
61 
24 
22 
24 
17 
24 

174 


$376.05 


Washington 


North East 

North West 


129.96 
59.80 


South West 


" 3 and 4 

" 5 


281.76 


Gravel Hill 


124 20 




■• 6 


63 25 




6965 

22 
27 
61 
46 
61 
21 


88,009.75 

£25.30 
31.05 
70.15 
52.90 
70.15 
24.15 


" 7 

" 8 


58.65 
27.60 




" 9 


25 . 30 


No. 1 

" 2 


" 10 

'• 11 


27.60 
19.55 


" 3. . 


" 12 


27.60 


" 4 


" 13 


200.10 


" 5 


Burlington. 

No. 1 ... 

" 2 




44 6 


909 

44 

25 
36 
55 
3o 
15 
20 
19 
95 


11,045.35 






238 

66 

95 
13 
44 
73 
26 
34 
74 
86 


F$273.70 

75.90 
109.25 
14.95 
50.60 
83.95 
29.90 
39.101 
85.10 
98.90; 


50.60 
28.75 




" 3 


41.10 




" 4 


63.25 


No. 1, N. W. Kensingt'n, 


" 5 


34.50 


" 2, N. E. " 


" 6 


17.24 


" 3, Center. 

" 4, South 


" 7 

" 8 


23.00 
21.85 


" 5, MiddleWorthin'n. 

" 6, N. W. 


" & 

Canton. 
Collinsville 


109.25 


" 7, N. E. 
" 8, 8. W. 
*' 9, East Berlin 


839 

332 
77 
62 
42 
N 
2* 
43 
28 
8 

651 


$389.85 
381.80 




511 

60 
64 
33 
22 

46 
37 


$587. 65 | 

69.00l 
73.60 
37.95 
25.30 
52.90 
42.55 


Suffrage , 


88.55 




lliver 


71.30 


Bloomfield. 


South Cen ter 


48.30 




Center 


41.40 


Center 


East Hill 


26.45 


Farms (Old). 


West 


49.45 


South Middle 


North 

North West 


32.20 


North Middle 


9.20 


South West 

Duncaster 






$748.65 



23 



East Hartford. 



Meadow District. 

Center 

Non h 

North Mill 

Second South. . . 

South East 

South Middle 

South Mill 

South 

North Second 



East Windsor. 



No. 1 
2. 
3, 
4. 
5. 
6, 



East Granby. 



No. 



Evfidd. 



No. 



o c 




u ° 










° is ^ c 


a 


<l 


89 


$102.35 


130 


149.50 


37 


42.55 


01 


70.15 


88 


101.20 


31 


35.65 


37 


42.55 


51 


58.65 


98 


112. 7u 


68 


78.20 


690 


$793.50 


44 


50.60 


32 


36.80 


42 


48.30 


14 


16.10 


172 


197.80 


27 


31.05 


21 


24.15 


136 


K6.40 


47 


54.05 


33 


37 . 95 


58 


66.70 


61 


70.15 


687 


$790.05 


60 


69.00 


25 


28.75 


45 


51.75 


22 


25.30 


15 


17.25 


53 


60.95 


220 


$253 . 00 


93 


106.95 


88 


101.20 


73 


83.95 


38 


43.70 


53 


60.95 


39 


44 s 85 


43 


49.45 


114 


131.10 


71 


81.65 


27 


31.05 


19 


21.85 


41 


47.15 


641 


737.15 


182 


209. 3U 


1522 


$1,750.30 



Farmingtc 



North District, 
Waterville .... 

West 

Scott Swamp. . 
West Plains... 
Scott Middle. . 
" South.. 
Unionville. . . . 

White Oak 

East Farm. . . , 
East Plains. . . 



Glastenbury. 



No. 1. 
2, 
3, 

4. 

5 

6, 

7, 

8. 

9, 

10, 

11. 

12, 

18 

14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 



Granby. 



No. 



Hartland. 



Center Dis. E. 
North East. . 
South East. . , 



Hartland. 



86 
75 
49 
35 

135 

121 
49 

187 
22 
54 

162 

915 



"*2 



I s 



$98.90 
17.2 
56.35 
40.25 

155.25 

139.15 
56 . 35 

215.05 
25.30 
62.10 

186.30 

$1,052.25 



127 
54 
92 
39 
37 

102 
43 
37 
69 
33 
21 
50 
32 
14 
20 
25 
28 



96 
55 
13 
68 
27 
44 
20 
28 
42 
21 

414 



24 
2<) 
30 



146.05 
62.10 

105.80 
44.85 
42.55 

117.30 
49.45 
42.55 
79 35 
37.95 
24.15 
57.50 
36.80 
16.10 
23.00 
28.75 
32.20 

$946.45 



110.40 
63.25 
14.95 
78.20 
31.05 
50.60 
23.00 
32.20 
48.30 
24.15 

$476.10 



27.60 
29.90 
34.50 



24 



JIartland, continued. 


<*- 
° d 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


Simsbury, continued. 
Hop Meadow 


e c 
|| 

~4 

41 

37 
17 
339 
5 
37 
21 


Amount of 

Dividend 

at $1.15 

pro rata. 


South West 


12 
12 
3 _ ) 
11 
27 
20 

197 

41 

147 

43 

114 

46 

44 

60 

189 

92 


$13. 80 
13.80 
40.25 
12.65 
31.05 
23.0(1 

$226.55 

47.15 

169.05 

49.45 

131.10 

52.90 

50.60 

69.00 

217.35 

105.80 


$89.10 

47.15 
42 55 
19.55 


" Hollow 

West Hartland Center. . 
North Hollow 


Weatogue, West 

East 

Meadow Plain 


Mill 


Taiiffville Plain 

" New 


389.85 


South 


5.75 




Westover's Plain 

Bushy Hill 


42.55 
24.15 


Manchester. 
No. 1 


Southington. 
No. 1 




667 

222 
43 
51 

177 
70 
30 
23 
81 
41 
82 

119 


$767.05 


" 2 






255.30 


" 3 


" 2 

" 3 




" 4 


49.45 
58.65 


" 5 


" 4 






203.55 


" 6 


" 5 






80.50 


" 7 


" 6 






34.50 


M 8 


" 7 






26.45 


" 9 


11 8 


41.40 




776 

58 
13 
17 
45 


$892.40 

66.70 
14.95 
19.55 
51.75 


" 9 


47.15 


Marlborough. 


" 10 

" 11 

South Windsor. 
No 1 


94.30 
136.85 


North Western District, 

South 

North 

Center 


894 

63 
32 
44 
40 
24 
40 
55 
28 
28 
17 


$1,028.10 

$72.45 

36 80 




" 2 




133 

922 
22 
55 

loo 

m 

156 


$152.95 

1,060.30 

25.3d 

63 25 

115.00 

198.95 

179.40 


«< 8 


50.60 


New Britain. 


" 4 


46.00 


No. 1 


" 5 ... 

- 7 


27.60 
46.00 


" 2 


" 8 


63 25 


" 3 


" 9 


32 20 


" 4 


" 10 


32.20 


M 5 


" 12 


19.55 


" 6 


Stiffield. 

Center, East Parish. .' . . 
South 






371 

181 

118 
68 
65 
50 
33 
53 

103 
48 
51 
37 


$426.65 

208.15 
135.70 


Rocky Hill. 
North 


1428 

36 
80 
66 
54 


$1,642.20 

41.40 
92.00 
75.90 
62.10 


Center 


South East 


7S.20 




Bast 


74 75 


West 


North East 


57.50 




North 


37 95 




236 

40 
16 

53 

27 


$271.40 

46.00 
18.40 

60.95 
31.05 


North West. 


60.95 


Simsbury. 


Center, West Parish. . . . 
South 


118.45 
55.20 




North 


58.65 


Terry's Plain 


West 


42.55 


" Farms 

" Center 






807 


$928.05 



25 



West Hartford. 

Center 

South 

West 

North 

North West 

Prospect Hill 

East 

South East 

Windsor Locks. 

North 

South 

Wethersfield. 

No. 1 

" 2 

" S.... '.'.'...'... 

" 4 

" 6 

" 6 , 



63 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


$72.45 


74 


85.10! 


26 


29.90 


32 


36.80, 


23 


26.45 


36 


41.40 


56 


64.40 


42 


48.3d 


352 


$404.80 


323 


371.45 


153 


175.95 


476 


$547.40 


80 


92.00 


57 


65.55 


76 


87.40 


48 


65.20 


70 


80.50 


52 


59.80 



Wethersfield, continued, 

Xewington, North 

Middle 

South East :. 

South 



Windsor, 

No. 1 

" 2 

" 3 

" 4 

" 5 

" 6 

" 7 

11 8 

" 9 

" 10 



530 



515 






$54.05 
46.00 
34.50 
34.50 



$609.50 



48.30 
42.55 
83.95 
74.75 
51.75 
51.75 
27.60 
49.45 
92.00 
70.15 

$592.25 



NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



New Haven. 



City District 

Westville 

Fair Haven District. . 



8431 
285 

795 



9511 



° 1 « i 
■e * •"! "S3 

S^ - >- 



),695 65 
327.75 
914.25 



$10,937.65 



Br an ford. 

Center 

Western 

North Western. . 
Paved Street. . . . 

Mill Plain 

Quarter 

Damascus 

Stony Creek 



0r V*O ci 



5 g S « eS rr 



234 
47 
52 
50 
59 
88 
35 
33 



$269.10 
54.05 
59.80 
57.50 
67.85 
101.20 
40.25 
37.95 



598 $687.70 



2G 



Brlha% : i. 



No. 1. 

" 2. 

" 3. 

M 4. 

" 5. 

'< G. 

" 7. 
Beacon 



Falk 



Ch ex/tire. 



No. 



Deri; 



No. 1. 

•' 2. 

" 3. 

" 4. 

r < 5. 

" 6 



,EW J7ai 



No. 



Guilfvrd. 

North West Center 
North East 
South Edst 
South West 
dapp Hoard Hill.. 
West Side 



-5 — 
1 Z 



East 

North 

South West. . . . 

South End 

Fair Haven. . . . 

Center 

North West. . . . 
West 



286 

112 

39 
28 
30 
21 
29 
45 
29 
42 
43 
52 
85 



555 

172 
252 
50 
555 
131 
373 



1533 

43 
19 
43 
63 

176 
58 

154 
41 



592 







., z. «— 


JZ 




3 


~ .X ■/.. 


— 


- > 


o 


|S4 


£. 


$60. 


95 


42. 


55 



.of. 
.55 
,60 
,20 
,55 
,45 



$:<28.90 



128 
44. 
32. 
34. 
24. 
33. 
51. 
33. 
48. 
49. 
59, 
97. 



Si i 



$638.25 

197.80 
289.80 
57 . 50 
638.25 
150.65 
428.95 



61,762.95 

49.45 
•Jl .85 
49.4") 
7 2 . 45 

202. W 
60.95 

177.10 
47 . 1 5 



.$680.80 



77.05 
56.35 
56 . 35 
111. 55 
21.85 
41.40 



(luilford, continued. 

Moose Hill 

Nut Plains North 

I. fit e'a Ufand 

Sachem's Head 

North Guilford South. . 
Middle 

North. 

Bluff... 

Nut Plains South 

Hamden. 

No. 1 

" 2 

" 3^1 '.'. 

" 4 

" 5 

'• 6 

" 7 

" 8 

" 9 

'■ 10 

" 11 

" 12 

" 13 

Madison. 

North Center 

Boston St. District 

[JnioD 

Liberty St 

Woods 

Neck 

North West 

Cast River 

South Center 

llanunonnssett 

Rockland 

West Side 



Meridcn. 

Hanover District 

East 

South East. 

West 

Ives 

North East 

Kailread 

Prattsville 



o _• o -r ,-• 
- "- - = ~. 3 
~ — - ■- to 



5S w < 



"93.40 



463 



133 
78 
18 

109 

22 



137 

151 



&is.8d 

81.05 

17.25 
11.50 
34 . 50 
40.25 
33.35 
27 . 60 
19.55 



•11 


47.15 


37 


42.55 


68 


78.20 


S3 


95.45 


64 


73.60 


44 


50.60 


26 


29.90 


86 


92.00 


46 


46.00 


35 


40.25 


81 


93.15 


4! 


50.60 


15 


17.25 



658 $756.70 



46.00 
62.10 
35.65 
27.60 
46.00 
54.05 
48.30 
49.45 
62.10 
37.95 
47.15 
16.10 

$532.45 



152.95 
89.70 
20.70 

125.35 
25.30 

157.55 
173.65 



27 



Mcriden, continued. 



Corner 

Farms 

Center. .... 
North Center 
01 J Road . . . 



Middlebunj. 



No. 1 



Milford. 



No. 1. 

" a. 

" 3. 

" 4. 



Naugatuck. 



Middle 

Millville... 
Union City. 

Hill 

Stratsville. , 
Union 



North Br art ford. 



No. 



u S 



495 

92 

211 

125 
104 



1675 

24 

28 
30 
31 

12 



125 



49 

6 

123 

37 

27 

391 



Q * £. 



$569. 
1(15. 
242. 
143] 
119. 



,920.2; 



$143 



$100. 
92. 
67. 



98.90 



26. 

75, 
46 
62 

17 

07 

70 



$733.70 



50, 
70. 

141, 
42 
31, 

449 



088 



$791.20 



27, 
80. 
89, 
54, 
29, 
62 
32, 



283 $325.45 



North Haven. 

N T o. 1 

" 2 


3 C 

5° 


Amount of 
Dividend 

at $1.15 
pro rata. 


39 

53 
52 
45 

49 
54 

49 

341 

39 
24 
17 
5 
12 
21 
25 
14 
23 
20 
21 
28 
18 


$44.85 
60 95 


" 8 . 


59 80 


" 4 


51.75 


" 5 




" 6 


50.35 


" 7 


02.10 


" 8 


50.35 


Oxford. 
No. 1 


$392.15 
44.85 


" 2 


27.00 


" '3 


19.55 


" 4 


5.75 


V 5 


13.80 


" 


24.15 


" 7 


28.75 


" 8 


10.10 


n a 


26.45 


■« 10 


29.90 


" ]1 


24.15 


" 12 


32.20 


" 13 


20.70 


Orange. 
No, 1 




273 

43 
40 
65 
19 

38 

88 

217 


$313.95 
49.45 


" 9 


40.00 


" 3 


74.75 


" 4 


21.85 


West 

North 


43.70 
101.20 


Union 


249.55 


Prospect. 
Center 




510 

52 
47 
27 
13 
21 


$580.50 
59.80 


East 


54.05 




31.05 




14.95 


West 


24.15 






160 


$184.00 



28 



Seymour. 


t ± 
35 


= — S 


Wallingford. 
Xo. 1 


•m 

z. • 

= ~ 

31 
39 

137 
55 

126 

43 
22 
11 

738 

98 
50 
18 
51 
15 
110 
19 
38 
7 
13 

2994 

24 
8 
13 
21 
33 
19 

118 


3 a* a 


No. 1, Great Hill 


119 

50 

73 
97 
69 


359.80 

136.88 

57.50 

83.95 
111. 55 




" 2, Shrub O.ik 


ii 9 


i i . SI 


" 3, Bunga 

M 4 


•• :; 


157.65 


" 4 




M 5 




144.90 


" 6 


" 6 


309.53 




•• 7 


40 25 




460 

47 
35 
36 
37 

22 
47 

12 

24 

5 

265 

48 
38 
12 
45 
44 


$529.00 

54.05 
40.25 

41.40 
42.55 

•J."..:. 1 
54.05 
13. SO 
27.60 

5. 7 3 

$304.75 

55.20 
43.70 
13.80 
51.75 

50.60 


" 8 


49.45 


Sonthbury. 


** 9 


25.30 


" 10 


12.65 


Center 


Waterbury. 

Center 

Town Piatt 




Purchase 


$883.20 


II-. How 




White Oak 

Bullet Hill 


2,954 .** 

112.70 


South ford 


Ilopville 

Bunks Hill 


64.40 


Kettletnwn 


20.70 


"Wapping 

Stou,v town 


Banker Hill 


58.65 


Bast Mountain 


17.25 




Waterville 


126.50 




East Farms 


21.85 


Woodbridge. 


Sawmill Plain 


43.70 


Clark 


8.05 


South West 


Oronoque 

Wolcott. 

Center 

North 

Xonh East 


14.95 


North East 


$3,443.10 


Middle 




South 


27.60 




• 9.20 
. 14.95 




187 


$215.05 




South 


24.15 




South West 


37.95 




West 


21.85 






$135.70 



NEW LONDON COUNTY. 



New London. 


© a 

S° 

337 
460 
564 
430 
459 
67 
71 

2388 

46 
29 
24 
16 
24 
56 
26 


a?S> * 

|« « 5. 

$387.55 
529.00 
648.60 
494.50 
527.85 
77.05 
81.65 

$2,746.20 

52.90 
33.35 
27.60 
18.40 
27.60 
64.40 
29.90 


East Lyme. 

No. 1 

" 2 




Amount of 
Dividend 
at SI. 15 
pro rata. 


No. 1 


34 
44 
27 
60 
48 
31 
55 
71 
15 

385 

14 
18 
25 
23 
46 
23 
25 
31 

205 

28 
29 
54 
22 
32 
19 
32 
23 
16 
22 
22 
176 


$39.10 


" 2 


50.60 


«' 3 


" 3 


31.05 


V 4 


" 4 


69,00 


" 5 




55.20 


" '6 


" 6 


35.65 


" 7 


u " 7. . 


63.25 




" 8 


81.65 




" 9 


17.25 


Bozrah. 
No. 1 


Franklin. 
No. 1 , 


$442.75 


" 2 




; 3 : . . . 


16.10 


* 4 


" 2 


20.70 


" 5 


" 3 

" 4 


28 75 


" 6 


26.45 


u 7 


" 5. 


52.90 




" 6 


26.45 




221 

285 
14 
40 
30 
13 
30 
36 
50 
30 

32 
21 
23 
22 
14 

640 


$254.15 

327.75 
16.10 
46.00 
34.50 
14.95 
34.50 
41.40 
57 . 50 
34.50 

36.80 
24.15 
26.45 
25.30 
16.10 

.$736.00 


" 7 


28.75 


Colchester. 


11 8 


35.65 


No. 1 


Griswold. 
No. 1 


$235.75 


" 2 


" 3 




" 4 


32.20 


" 5 


" 2. . 


33.35 


" 6 


u 3. . 


62.10 


" 7 


11 4. . 


25 30 


" 8 


" 5. . 


36.80 


" 9 


" 6 

" 7 . 


21 85 


" 10 


36.80 


Center 


" 8. . 


26.45 


North West 


M 9 


18.40 


North East 


" 10. . 


25.30 


South West 


" 11 


25.30 


South East 


" 12 


202.40 









30 



Orinoold, continued. 


u * 

I s 


o *2 «o d 

_ r •— • — 


Lebanon, continued. 

Xo. 15 

" 10 


-1 

. "Z 

fl 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


No. 13 


20 

22 


$,23.00 
26.80 


21 
10 


$24.15 
1 1 . 50 


" 11 




Lisbon. 
N'o. 1 




Groton. 


537 

204 
80 
49 
8ii 

367 
69 

IOC. 
27 
32 

124 

151 

12S9 

32 
27 
36 
17 
22 
17 
18 
22 
25 
16 
37 
26 
35 
39 


$594.55 

234 . 60 
92.00 
56.35 
92.00 

422.05 
79.35 

121.90 
81.06 
86. 80 

142.60 

178.65 

$1,482.35 

36.80 
31 .05 
41.40 
19.55 
25 . 80 
19.55 
20.70 
25.86 
28.75 
18.40 
42.55 
32.20 
4ii.25 
44. S5 


458 

21 
27 
18 

24 
23 

41 
4 
1 
9 

184 

60 
47 

17 
50 
55 


$526.70 
24.16 


No. 1 


.1 


3 1 . 05 


« 9 


" 3. . 


14.95 


" 3 


" 4 

" 5 


■ 


" 1 


26.45 


** 5 


" 6 . 


20. 7o 


" 6 


" 6 in Sprague 

7 in Ltsb >n 

u 7 in Canterbury.. . 
■ 7 in Sprague 

Lyme. 

Xo. 1 


47.15 


M 7 


4.60 


" 8 


4.60 


" 


10.35 


* 10 




" 11 

Ledyard. 


$211.60 

69 00 
54.05 


" 3 


71.30 


No. 1 


" 4 


41.40 


" 2 


" 5 


19.55 


" 3 


" 6 


57.60 


«' 4 


LIadl\ me 


03.25 


" 5 


Montville. 

Xo. 1 

« 2 

" 3 





" 6 


3-7 

19 

176 
26 
18 

8 
25 
51 
99 
24 
58 
21 

5S7 

619 
122 

63 
419 
702 

29 

1131 

2S1 


$376.05 






* 8 


26.45 


" 9 


21.86 


" 10 


42.55 


" 11 


" 4 


202.40 


" 12 


" 5 




" 13 


" 6 


20.70 


" It 


" 7 


9 . 20 




" 8 






371 

50 
80 

31 
49 
: 4<> 
38 
26 
14 
80 
30 
16 
31 
22 
19 


$426.65 

59.80 
34 . 50 
55 66 
56.35 
46. QO 

4:i. 7" 
28.75 
16.10 


f 9 

" 10 


113.85 




•' 11 


27.60 


No. 1 

« 2 


" jo 

" 13 


66.70 
24.15 


" 3 

" 4 


Norwich. 
Wt^t Chelsea 


$675.05 


«• 5 




" 6 

" 7 


711 85 


" 8 


West Town Street 


140.30 


" 9 


34 . 50 
34 . 50 
18.40 
35.65 

21.85 


■Mill 


7 2.4 5 


" 10 


Falls 


4. si. 95 


" 11 


Greenville 


807.30 


" 12 


Waurecna Hill 


33.35 


■ 13 


Center 


1,300.65 


" 14 


LTown Street 


323.15 



31 



Norwich, continued. 


o - 
g S3 

5S 


Amount of 

Dividend 

at Si. 15 

pro rata. 


Salem. 
No. 1 , 


l 6 


5 a Si 

= G "S ^ 


Plain Hill 


9 
28 
66 
43 

3512 

24 

60 
46 
41 
31 
28 
21 
16 
17 
32 
17 
20 
23 
26 
23 
14 
3 


$10.35 
32.20 

75 . 90 
49.45 


15 
14 

27 
32 
23 
25 
34 
32 


117.25 




" 2 


16.10 




" 3 . 


31 05 




" 4 


36.80 




" 5 


26 45 




$4,038.80 

27.60 
69.00 
52 . 90 
47.15 
35.65 
32.20 
24.15 
18.. 40 
19.55 
36.80 
19.55 
23.00 
26.45 
29.90 
26.45 
16.10 
3.45 


" 6 


2S.75 


X or lit Slonington. 


7 , 

" 8 


39.10 

36. SO 


No 1 


Sprague. 
No. 1 




• < 2 


202 

415 

12 
81 
67 

575 

29 

60 

332 

19 

132 
16 
25 

504 
41 
44 
30 

13 

17 

198 

111 

20 


$232.30 


". 3 




" 4 






477.25 


" 6 


44 2. .' 


13. SO 


" 7.. 


'** 3 


93.15 


" 8 


" 4 


77 05 


" !'•. 


Stonington. 
No. 1 




" 10 


$661.25 


" 11 


" 12 


33.35 


" 13 


'• 2 


69". 00 


" U 


" 3 

" 4 


381.80 


*■ 15 


21.85 


" 14, Joint Diet. Ledy'd 

" 15, do do. Stoningt'n 


" 5 (No report) 

" 6 


151.80 






18.40 
28.75 


Old Lyme. 

No. 1 

" 2 


442 

70 

22 
28 
48 
53 
38 
56 
18 


$•508.30 

80.50 
25.30 
32.20 
55 . 20 
60 . 95 
43.70 
64.40 
20.70 


" 8 


" 9 

" 10 

" 11 

" 12 


579.60 
47.15 
50 60 


" 3 


34.50 


" 4 


" 13 (No School) 

" 14 

" 15 




" 5 


14.95 


" 6 


19.55 


" 7 


" 16 

" 18 


227 70 


'« 8 


127 65 




" 19 

Watcrford. 
No. 1 

.< O 


23.00 




333 

64 
175 
15 
48 
28 
31 
46 
18 
12 
28 
19 
33 

517 


$382.95 

73 . 60 
201.25 
17.25 
55.20 
32.2(1 
35 . 65 
52.90 
20.70 
13.80 
32.20 
21.85 
37.95 


No. 1 


1591 

n 

55 
85 
06 
131 
69 

$ 

29 
679 


$1,829.65 


M 2 


85.10 


" 3 


63.25 


" 4 


u 


97 75 


<; 5 

" 6 


u 4 

" 5.. ; 


75.90 
150.65 


" 7 


" P 


79 35 


" 8 


" 7 


9 9 90 




•• 8 


42.55 


" 10 


*! 9 


69 00 


" 11 


" 10 

" 11 


54.05 


" 12 


33.33 










$594.55 


$780.85 



FAIEFIELD COUNTY. 



Fairfield. 


- ri 


S 4j • 9 

^3 * E. 


Bridgeport. 
Bridgeport 


= a 

•— z, 

Z) — 

IS 

1169 

350 
380 

23: 

5£ 

108 
331 


Amount of 
Dividend 

at $1.15 
pro rata. 


Middle, 


169 

111 

180 

82 

138 

40 

44 

26 

33 

24 

44 

51 

25 

21 

18 

200 

42 

1248 

193 

60 
46 
32 
26 


SI 94. 35 

127.65 

207.00 

94.30 

. 158.7c 

46.00 

50.60 

29.90 

37.95 

27.60 

50.60 

58.65 

28.75 

24.15 

20.7n 

230.00 

48 . 30 

81,435.20 

221.95 
69.00 
52 . 90 
36.80 
29.90 


11,34 l 35 


Mill Plain, 


Golden Bill 


402.50 


Division 


Washington 


437.00 


Black Rock, 


Union 


26 7.9 5 


Old South, 


Ireland Brook 


66.70 


North. . . . 


Pequonnock 


124.20 


Holland Hill 




380 66 


Tolisonie, . . 


Waltonville 


140 
66 

3372 

1022 
341 
159 
53 
54 
71 
22 
44 
26 
31 
62 
24 
32 


618.70 


Banks South, 


Ea>t Bridgeport 

Pembroke 


161.00 


Banks North,. . 


74 . 75 


Burrs, 


Danbwry. 

Middle Center & North . 
Middle Center <fc South. . 

Grassy Plain 

Mill Plain 




Center 


$3,877 80 


Haydens Hill 




Bulklevs 




Deerfield 




Southport 




Jenning Woods 


1,175.30 

392.15 

182.85 

60.95 




1 Great Plain 


62.10 


Bcthe 1 


Mi rev Brook 


81.65 




Bogg8 


25.30 




Middle River 


50.60 


Wild Cat 




29..90 


Plumb Trees. 


Kinor Street 


35.65 


Wolf Pitts 


Reaver Brook 


71.30 


Stony Hill 


Long Ridge 


27.60 






36 80 




357 

53 
•11 
39 
35 
29 
19 
20 
5 
11 

260 


$410.55 

60.95 
50.60 
44.85 

40.25 
88.85 
21.85 
28 . 75 
5.76 
12.65 

$299.00 


Darien. 
N'orton 




Brookficld. 


1941 

128 
119 

108 
81 


$2,232.15 

147.20 


West Iron Works 


Ox Ridge 


136.85 


East Iron Works 

Whortleberry Hill 


Center.. 


1-4.20 


Holmes 


93.15 


Easton. 
No. 1, Center 




Obtuse 


436 

38 
31 


$501.40 


Bound Swamp 

North Mountain 


43.70 




" 3, Narrows 


35.65 



33 






Easton, continued. 

No. 4, Union Corners. .. 
" 6, Yel. School ITuse. 
" 6, Blanket Meadow 

" 7, Rock House 

" 9, Gump Hill 

" 10, Church 



Greenwich. 

Greenwich East 

Peck's Land 

Palmer Hill 

Lower Coscob , 

Steep Hollow. 

Factory, Glenville 

Lower King Street.... 

Bound Hill , 

Upper King Street. 
Meeting House, Green'h 

Byram , 

East Port Chester 

Miamis 

Rivei ville , 

North Greenwich..... 

North Coscob , 

Lower Stanwich 

Upper " 

North Street ; 

Banksville 

Clapboard Ridge 



Huntington. 

Center 

Booth's Hill...... 

Ising Glass. ...... 

Trapp's Fall 

Mill 

Long Hill 

Coram 

Ferry 

French 

Lower White Hills 
Upper " " 
Walnut Tree Hill.. 

Monroe. 

Center 

Eastern 

Walker's Farm... 







O g 


c ^o « 


t- 9 


- J2 • S 




O > o 

£ (5 * a. 


43 


$49.45 


47 


54.05 


19 


21.85 


17 


19.55 


25 


28.75 


44 


50.60 


264 


$303.60 


93 


106.95 


36 


41.40 


46 


52.90 


129 


148.35 


97 


111.55 


51 


68.65 


49 


56.35 


126 


144.90 


41 


47.15 


410 


471.50 


109 


125.35 


161 


185.15 


103 


118.45 


41 


47.15 


51 


58 . 65 


74 


85.10 


99 


113.85 


41 


47.15 


31 


35.65 


28 


32 . 20 


28 


32.20 


1844 


$2,120.60 


34 


39.10 


24 


27.60 


19 


21.85 


11 


12.65 


27 


31.05 


24 


27.60 


7 


8.05 


71 


81.65 


17 


19.55 


21 


24.15 


39 


44.85 


24 
318 


27.60 


$365.70 


4G 


52.90 


38 


43.70 


29 


33.35 



Monroe, continued. 

Birdsey Plain 

Stepney 

Elm Street 

Cutler's Farm 

New Canaan. 

No. 1 

" 2 

" 3 

" 4 

" 5 

M 6 

" 7 

" 8 

" 9 

" 10 

" 11 

New Fairfield. 

Wood Creek 

Eastern Center 

Western Cer»t«*# 

Pond ville (Ball*.) 

Great Hollow 

Centerville 

Great Meadow 

Newtown. 

Sandy Hook 

North Center 

South Center 

Middle Center 

Poohatuek. 

Zoar 

Gray's Plain 

Toddy Hill 

Middle Grate 

Half Way River 

Taunton 

Land's End 

Lake George 

Hanover 

Palestine 

Gregory's Orchard. . . 

Huntington 

Flat Swamp 

Hopewell 

Head of Meadow 



0>± 



285 

238 
63 
26 
41 
42 
28 
47 
60 
59 
3-2 
30 



c ^^ 4 



■ 0* 



225 

100 
80 
38 
95 

105 
70 
30 
35 
22 
23 
61 
31 
23 
82 
33 
43 
2 -a 
25 
15 
30 



$66.70 
50 . 60 
34.50 
4G.00 



$327.75 

273.70 
72.45 
29.90 
47.15 
48.30 
82.20 
54.05 
69.00 
67.85 
36.80 
34.50 



$765.90 

14.95 
7^.60 
33.35 
33.35 
19.55 
34.59 
49.45 



$258.75 

115.00 
92.00 
43.70 
109.25 
120.75 
80.50 
34.50 
40.25 
25.30 
26.45 
70.15 
35.65 
26.45 
36.80 
37.95 
49.45 
26.45 
28.75 
17.25 
34.60 



914 $1,051.10 



Nor walk. 

Center School District 
South Norwalk Uuion. 

Over River 

Down Town 

Norih Center 

South Five Mile River. 
Middle " u " . 

Nort h 

North Fast 

North West 

Broad River 

Redding. 

No. 1, Outer 

" 2, Redding Ridge. 

" 3, Couch's Hill... 

" 4, Diamond Hill.. 

■ 5, Boston 

u 6, Mull 

J* 7, Umpsauage... . 

* 8, Zone Town 

« 9, Picket's Ridge. 

* 10, Foundry 

Ridyefield. 

No. 1, Scotland 

" 2. Bennett's Farm 

" 3, Limestone 

«« 4, Titicus 

" 5, West Mountain 

jf 6, Town Street. . 

" 7, West Lane 

" 8, Whipstick 

»• 9, Flat Rock 

" 10, City 

" 11. Florida 

" 12, Farmingville.. . 

" 13, Bell District. .. 

" 14, South 

" 15, North 

Sherman. 

No. 1 

" 2 

" 3 

" 4 

" 5 

" C 



o a 

16 



376 

547 

418 

156 

91 

72 

71 

82 

45 

132 

58 



C T O 

- S _; 



$* 



$432. 
629. 
480. 
179, 
104. 

82. 

81. 

94. 

51, 
151, 

66. 



Stamford. 



Graded Center.. 
Green. East. . . . 
No. Stamford. . . 
High Ridge. . . . 

Roxhury 

Farms 

Bengali 

Long Ridge. . . . 
Turn of River. . 
Hunting Ridire. 
Richmond Hill. 



2048 $2,355 20 



386 

39 

24 
21 
64 
51 

77 
30 
24 
29 
44 
34 
16 
41 
41 
24 



559 

25 

20 
63 
31 
31 
41 



S3 . 
0.-) 

M 

81, 
56, 
29 

55 
2 1 
IS 

4 'J 



Simsbury. . . 

Cove 

Deanville. . . 
Hope Street 



Stratford. 



Oranoque, 
Putney. .. 



$443 . 90 



44. 
27. 
24, 
73. 
58, 
88, 
34, 
27, 
33, 
50, 
39, 
18, 
47, 
47. 
27. 



New North. . 

Union , 

Old North... 

South Middle 
Old South. .. 
Newfield. . . . 



Trumbull. 



Lon^ Hill 

Nichols Farms. , 
[White Plains. . . 
jChestnut Hill. . 
Daniel's Farms. 

Tashua 

Lakeville 



$642.85 



28. 
23. 
72. 
35. 
35. 
47. 



211 $242.65, 



Weston, 

No. 1, Upper Parish. . 

" 2, Lyms Plains. . . 

" 3, Den 

" 4. Good Hill .. 

" 5, Forge 

" 6, Middle 

11 7, Kettle Creek... 



u 

I 6 




662 


$761.30 


395 


454.25 


33 


37.95 


51 


58.65 


72 


82.80 


54 


62.10 


42 


48.30 


64 


73.60 


50 


57.50 


48 


55.20 


254 


292.10 


29 


33.35 


57 


65.55 


35 


40.25 


58 


66.70 



1904 



474 



280 



$2,189.60 



23.00 
50.60 
87.40 
49.45 
80.50 
09,25 
53.85 
31.05 



$545.10 



69.00 
111.55 
27.60 
34.50 
42.55 
27.60 
9.20 



$322.00 



47.15 
59.80 
39.10 
70.15 
23.00 
55.20 
29.90 



282 $324.30 



35 



Westport. 

EastSaugatuck 

West " 

South " 

North District 

Compo 

Cross Highway 

Poplar Plains 

Green's Farms 

West Long Lots 

East Long Lots, Fairfield 
and Westport 



u 2 

Sfi. 

163 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at SI. 15 
pro rata. 


$187.45 


108 


124.20 


80 


92.00 


45 


51.75 


99 


113.85 


110 


126.50 


32 


36.80 


66 


75.90 


45 


51.75 


56 


64.40 

| 


804 


S924.60 ' 



No. 1. 

2. 

3. 
4. 
5. 
0. 

7. 



Wilt07i. 



Dis. No. 8, New Canaan. 



° 1? »o <*' 



5 U M 



5 £«* 



36 


$41.40 


48 


55.20 


42 


48.30 


67 


77.05 


44 


50.60 


90 


103.50 


63 


72.45 


8 


9.20 


30 


34.50 


75 


86.25 


14 


16.10 



517 1 $594.55 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 



Litchfield. 


Cm 

E '- 


Amount of 
Dividend 
atSl.15 
pro rata. 


Litchfield, continued. 
Gilbert 


I 6 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


Litchfield 


107 
39 
15 
39 
31 
23 
13 
22 
12 
68 
38 
41 
19 
24 
23 
60 
11 
26 


$123.05 
44.85 
17.25 
44.85 
35.65 
26.45 
14.95 
25.30 
13.80 
78.20 
43.70 
47.15 
21.85 
27 . 60 
26.45 
69.00 
12 65 
29.90 


21 
56 
24 
32 
10 

754 

19 
23 
16 
14 
16 
20 
10 
25 


S24.15 


North Street 


Norihfield Center 

Guernsey Hill. . 


64.40 


Fluteville 


27.60 


Harris Plain 


Newbury and Brooker. . 
Hopkins 


36.80 


Bantam 


11.50 


Bradleyville 


BarJchamsted. 
No 1 




Marsh 


$867.10 


Mount Tom 




Beach Street 




South Plain 




Chestnut Hill 


21.85 


East Chestnut Hill 


" 2 


26.45 


Depot 


" 3 


18.40 


Newcomb 


u 4 


16.10 


North Farms 


" 5 


18.40 


Milton 


« 6 


23.00 


Head Quarters 


•« 7 


11.50 


Prospect 


" 8 


28.75 



3(3 



Barkhamslcd, continued. 


O C 


Amount of 
Dividend 

at SI. 1.') 
pro rata. 


Cornwall. 
No. 1 


o = " 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at SI. 15 

pro rata. 


No. 9 


79 
29 


$90.8' 
33.35 


42 
33 
43 
28 
27 
°2 
26 
104 
12 
28 
19 
15 
24 
16 
60 
17 
28 


$48.30 


" 10 


" 2 


37.95 




" 3 


49 45 


Bethlem. 


251 

53 

19 
22 
13 
29 
18 
6 
23 


$288.65 

60.95 
21.85 
25.30 
14.95 
83.35 
20.70 
6.90 
26.45 


•' 4 

" » 

" 6 


32.20 
31.05 
25.30 


No. 1 


t. *, 


29.90 


" 2 


" 8 

u 9 

" 10 

" 11 

" 12 

" 18 


119.60 


" 3 


13.80 


•• 4 


82 . 20 


" 5 


21.85 


»« 6 


17.25 


« 7 


27.60 


" 8 


" 14. . 


18.40 




"15 


69 00 




183 

152 
47 
33 
37 
37 


$210.45 

$174.80 
54.05 

37.95 
42.55 
42.55 


" 16. . 


19.55 


Bridgeicater. 


" 17 


32.20 


Goshen. 
No. 1 




No. 1 


544 $625.60 


H 






90 
45 
15 
25 
14 
20 
50 
16 
11 
7 
2S 
24 

344 

32 
2:; 
22 

25 
37 
M 

24 

27 
8 
2" 
4S 
10 




" 4 




" 5 


103.50 




11 2 


51.75 




306 

61 
60 
40 
33 
20 
25 
20 
31 
42 
82 


$351.90 

70.15 
69.00 
46.00 
37.95 
23.00 
28.75 
23.00 
35.65 
48.30 
94.30 


" 3. . 


17.25 


Canaan. 


" 4 

" 5 


28.75 
16. 10 


No. 1 


•■ 6 

'« 7 


23.00 


" 2 


57.50 


•• 3 


" 8 


17.25 


•' 4 


" 9 


12.65 


" 5 


" 10 


8.05 


" 6 


Union 


32.20 


•• 7 


No. 12 


27.60 


■ 8 


Harwinton. 
N T o. 1 




" 9 


$395.60 


" 10 






Colebrook. 


414 

27 
34 
20 
19 
43 
80 
17 
37 
67 
53 


$476.10 

31.05 
39.10 
23.00 
21.85 
49.45 
34.50 
19.55 
42.55 
77.05 
60.95 


36.80 




" 2 


26.45 


Center 


«« 3 


25.30 


South 


« 4 


28.75 


South West 


" 5 


42 55 


West 


" 6 


32 20 


Rock 


« 7 


27.60 


North 


" 8 


31.05 


Beach Hill 


« 9 


9.20 


Sandy Brook 


" 10. . 


23 00 


River 


" 11 


55.20 


Forge 


'« 12 


11 50 










347 


$399.05 


304 


$349.60 



37 



Kent. 


"3 c 


Amount of 
Dividend 
atSl.15 
pro rata. 


New Milford, continued. 
No. 8 


<*- 

O c 


.amount of 

Dividend 
at Si. 15 
pro rata. 


No. 1 


72 
50 
30 
37 
54 
36 
21 
21 
33 
35 
44 
19 
32 


$S2.80 
57 . 50 
34.50 
42.55 
62.10 
41.40 
24.15 
24.15 
37.95 
40.25 
50.60 
21.85 
36.80 


53 
44 
49 
44 
19 
15 
51 
73 
30 
64 
14 


sOo. 95 


" 2 


" 9 


50.60 


" a 


" 10 


56.35 


" 4 


" 11 


50.60 


" 5 


" 12 


21.85 


" G 


" 13 


17.25 


" 7 


" 14 


58.65 


" 8 


" ] 5 


83.95 


" 9 


" 16 


34 . 50 


" 10 


" 19. . 


73.60 


" 12 


« 20 


16.10 


' ; 13 


Norfolk. 

East Pond 

South Center 




" 14 


852 

7 
16 
22 
35 
71 
19 
121 
20 
18 
33 
22 
o 

28 


$979.80 




Morris. 


484 

39 
30 
45 
40 
16 
19 


^556.60 

44.85 

34.50 
51.75 
46.00 
18.40 
21.85 


8.05 
18.40 


No. 1 




25.30 


! South Norfolk 

|West " 

West Center 




M 2 


40.25 


" 3 


81.65 




21 .85 


" 4 


Center 






139.15 


" 5 


East Middle 

;P--nd 

North Norfolk 




" 6 


23.00 




20.70 


New Hartford. 


189 

85 
115 
144 
83 
32 
75 
46 
36 
45 
22 


$217.35 

97.75 
132.25 
165.60 
37.95 
25.30 
86.25 
52.90 
41.40 
51.75 
25.30 


37.95 


(North Middle 


|_25.30 


North End 


Crissev 


2.30 


SouthEud '. . . . 




Pine Meadow 


32.20 


Plymouth. 
No. 1 




North East 

West Hill 


414 

116 
244 
28 
53 
17 
14 
17 
19 
49 
202 
48 
40 
64 


$476.10 


Furnace 


133.40 


Bakerville 


" 2 


2S0.60 


Merrills 


" 3 


32.20 


Town Hill 


" 4 


60.95 


South East Middle 

South East 


" 5 

" 6 


19.55 
16.10 




(i /j 


19 55 


North Canaan. 


623 

114 

120 
41 
23 
65 


1718.46 

131.10 

138.00 

47.15 

26.45 

74.75 


M 8 


21.85 




" 9 


56.35 


No. 1 


" 10 . 


2*2.30 


" 2 


" 11 


55.20 


" 3 


" }0 


46.00 


" 4 


11 14 


73.60 


" 5 


Roxbury. 

N T o. 1 

" 2 


911 

63 
18 
18 
20 
40 
29 
39 







$1,047.65 


New Mil ford. 


363 

181 
46 
57 
3H 
23 
39 
17 


8117.45 

20S.15 
52 . 90 
65.55 
37.95 
26.45 
44. S5 
19.55 


72.45 
20.70 


No. 1 


" 3 


20 70 


M O 


" 4. . 


23 00 


" 3 


" 5 


46 00 


" 4 


M 7. . 


33.35 


" 5 


" 8 


44 85 


M g 






" 7 


227 


$261.50 



38 



Salisbury. 


O B 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


Warren. 
Center . 


Number of 

Children. 
Amount of 
Dividend 
LIS 

pro rata. 


No. 1 


37 

119 

33 

88 

31 

28 

130 

110 

39 

102 

60 

44 

21 

40 


142.66 

136.85 


39 
11 
19 
22 

28 
41 
27 
15 


$44.85 
12.65 
21 85 


" 2 




" 3 


37.95 
101.2ti 


Noith East 


" 4 


'Pond 


25 30 


H 5 


35.65 

32.20 

149.50 


West . . . 


32 20 


" 6 


North 


47 15 


" 7 


College Farms 

South River 


31 05 


" 8 


l -it;. 60 

44.85 

117.30 

69.00 

50 60 


17 25 


«• 9 


Washington. 




" 10 


202 

36 
56 
23 
29 
24 
13 

w 

34 
40 
61 
19 
32 

384 

149 
19 
20 

18 
70 
28 
21 
38 
12 


$233.36 


" 11 


«' 12 




" 13 


24.15 


No. 1. .. 


41 40 


" 14 


46.00 


11 2 

" 3 


64 40 




20.45 




882*1.014 3( 


" 4 


33.35 


Sharon. 


30 
63 
30 
57 
37 
69 
42 
23 
20 
101 
28 
24 
47 
25 
17 
12 
26 
63 


34.50 
72.45 
34.50 
65.55 
42.55 
79.35 
48.30 
26.45 
29.90 
116.15 
32 20 
27.6c 
54.05 
28 75 
19.55 


" 5 


27.60 




" 6 


14.95 


No. 1 


" 7 

" 8 


19 55 


" 2 


39.10 


" 3 


" 9 

" 10 


46 00 


" 4 


70.16 


" 5 


" 11 


21.85 


" 6 


"12 


36.80 


m y 


Watertoicn. 
Center 




" 8 

" 9 


$441.60 


"10 




"11 


171.35- 


'• 12 


Polk 


21.85 


" 13 


French Mountain 

Gurne.*ev Town 

Oakville" 


23 00 


"14 


20.70 


" 15.. 


80.50 


" 16 


18:80 


[Nova Srotia 


32.20 


"17 


28.75 

72.45 


East Side 


24.15 


"18 


Poverty Street 

Liukfield 


43.70 




I 


13 SO 




719 

34 
47 
35 
86 
18 
43 
24 
41 
24 
298 
11 


$820.85 

39.10 
54.05; 
40.25 
41.40 
20.70 
49.45 
27.60 
47.15 
27.60 
342.70 
12.45 


Winchester. 

Xo. 1 

« 2 




Torrington. 
No. 1 


375 

131 
88 
32 

409 
21 
27 
36 
2 
24 
10 


S431.25 


« o 


150.65 


" 3. . 


101.20 


h 4 


" 3. . 


36.80 


" 6 


" 4 


470.35 


North Torrinpford 

South Torringford 

Center Tocringford 

Second, Wolenti ville . 


" 5 


24.15 


" 6 

" 7 

" 8 


31.05 

41.40 

2.30 


First, Wolcotiville 

No 5 


" 9 

"10 


27.60 
11.50 










6111 


$702.65 


7t'.' 


$S97.00 



39 



Woodbury. 



No. 1 

" 2 

" 3 

" 4 

" 5 

" G 

" 7 

" 8 



o c 

E "" 
I 5 


= 1= 12 * 
2 .s: - o 


36 


$41.40 


52 


59.80 


51 


58.65 


30 


34.50 


13 


14.95 


30 


34.50 


25 


28.75 


18 


20.70 



Woodhtry, continued. 

No. 9 

" 10 

" 11 No school) 

«« 12 

" 13 

" 14 





"c -a w 




5- ^ 


cjj 


-C _z 


= .X «3 




E r 




c 


*° 


r ^ <s 


H 


19 


$21 


8fl 


70 


80 


50 


7 


8 


05 


24 


27 


60 


69 


79 


35 


444 


$510.60 



WINDHAM COUNTY. 



Brooklyn. 

No. 1 

" 2 

" 3 

" 4 

" 5 

" 6 

" 7 

" 8 

" 9 



A shford. 

No. 1 Westford Society 

" 2 

* 3 

" 4 

«• 1 Old Society 

" 2 

" 3 

" 4 

'« 5 

" 6 Westford 



'■— 




o a 


s'Ha _• 




§ 4j ri ^ 








§•--2 


15 i 


$173.6.. 


33 


37.95 


15 


17.25 


18 


20.70 


25 


28.75 


34 


39 . 1 


24 


27.60 


23 


26.45 


143 


1 64 . 45 


466 


$535.90 


17 


19.55 


36 


41.40 


20 


23.00 


66 


75 . 90 


43 


49.45 


17 


19.55 


41 


47.15 


35 


40.25 


42 


48.30 


16 


18.40 


333 


$382.95 



Canterbury. 

No. 1 

u 2 

« 3 

" 4 

" 5 

" 6 

" 7 

" 8 

" 9 

11 10 

" 11 

" 12 

Chaplin. 

No. 1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 



\o c *c 'H lO OJ 

s- ? - ? -- "S 

e •- c '> • o 

E ~ c — ** t-, 



396 



$42.55 
19.55 
34.50 
72.45 
34.50 
42.55 
47.15 
12.65 
24.15 
28.75 
44.85 
51.75 

$455.40 



35.65 
29.90 
18.40 
23.00 
34.50 
34 . 50 
35.65 



184! $211.60 



40 



Eattford. 


O B 


•— 

*j m ■ - 
a 3 m *" 

- - _ S 


Plain 

No. 10, 

" 11, 
'• 12, 
" 13. 
" 14. 
Packer 

No. 1. 

•■: 

" 5. 

" 6. 
" 7. 

" 8. 


field, continued. 

Goshen 

Almyville 

Pond Hill 

Green Hollow. . 

Shepard llill.. . 

»ville 

Pomfret. 


'd » "g to d 

• J = -i - 2 


No. 1 


79 
47 
52 

w 

20 
24 
31 
18 


*•.».». s; 
54. or, 
59 . 80 
31.05 
28.00 

35.65 
20.70 


46 


« o 


M 108.10 


• 4 3 

" 4 

■ 5 


44 

21 

252 

10 


50.60 

24.15 

289.80 


" 6 


11.50 


m 7 




■ 8 


880 11.018.00 






Hampton, 


298 

38 

24 

4n 

23 
41 
35 
24 

225 

135 

157 

17 

75 

34 

108 

111 

92 

60 

6 
21 
135 
64 
26 
30 
30 
18 
33 


$342.7" 

43.70 
27.6" 
46.00 
26.45 
47.15 
40.25 


39 
39 
30 
U 

13 


44.85 




44.85 


Center 




34.50 


South Billow 




27.60 


North Bigelow 

Assnguag 




14.95 




58.65 


Goshen 


• 
Putnam. 


4" 46.00 


Union 


s». SO 


South 


27.6" 


" 9. 
" 10. 

No 1. 


45 51.75 
2i 24.15 




$258.75 

155.26 

180.55 


Killingly. 

No. 1 

w 2 


384 

37 
27 
29 

3" 


so 7 2. 60 
42.55 


" 3 


19.55 «. 2. 

86.25 " 3. 

39.1" " 4. 
117.30 " 5. 
127.65 " 6 




31.05 
33.35 
34.50 


" 6 

" 7 




222 255.30 
: 1 346.15 


" 8 

" 9 

" 10 

" n 


105.80 

69.00 

6.90 

24.15 

155.25 


" 7. 
No 1. 


Scotland. 


43.70 


584 >7S6.60 
51< 58.65 


" 13. . 


73.60 " 2. 
29. V" " 3. 
34.50 u 4. 
34.5" " 5. 
20.70 " 6. 
37 




29 . 90 


M H 




25 28.75 


- 15 




34 . 50 


■ 16 




24 27.60 


« 17 




4 4.60 


"18 


Sterling. 










160 

27 

36 
31 
42 
41 
31 
19 
2" 
20 


S1S4.00 
31.05 


Plainfeld. 


1146 

75 

11 

- 

21 

-" 

29 

60 

81 

62 


6L317.9" 

86.25 

12 65 


No. 1. 

M 2. 
" 3. 
" 4 






41.40 


No 1, Middle 




35 . 65 


" 1 Stone Hill . 




48.30 


" 3 Flat Rock . 


33.3ft " 5. 
24.15 " 6 




47.15 


'• 4. South 




35.65 


'•' White Hall. . 


M H 

33.35 
69.00 
93.15' 

94.30 


*• 7. 
" 8. 
" 9. 




21.85 


" 6. Black Hill.. 




23.00 


" 7, Kennedy 

41 8, Central 

" 9, Moosup 




23.00 






267 


$307.05 



41 



Thompson. 


o c 
«- 9 
* — 

1° 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


Windham, continued. 
" 3 


c 


Amount of* 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


No. 3 


63 
90 
68 
53 
113 
34 
23 
72 
75 
28 
37 
27 
90 


$72.45 

103. 50 1 
78.20 
60.95 1 

129.95 
39.10; 
26.45 
82.80S 
86.25: 
32.20: 
42.55 
31.05J 

103.50! 


13 
30 
58 
85 
23 
86 
29 
18 
31 


$14.95 


" 4 


" 4 


34.50 


" 5 


" 5 


66.70 


■ 6 


" 6 


97.75 


■ 7 


" 7 


26.45 


" 8 


u 8 

«■ 9 


98.90 


" 9 


33.35 


" 10 


" 10 


20.70 


" 11 


" 11 


35.65 


" 12 


Woodstock. 
No. 1 




" 13 


1095 

55 
97 
30 
61 
52 
34 
62 
22 
59 
19 
52 
16 
17 

*s 

27 
30 

78 


$1,259.25 


u 15 


" 16 










773 

13 
15 
20 
129 
34 
12 
30 
12 
29 
36 

330 

380 
342 


$888.95' 

14.95J 
17.25| 
23.00; 
148. 35 1 
39.10 
13.80] 
34.50 
13.80: 
33.35; 

41.40 



"$379.50 

437.00 
aos an 


63.25 


Voluntown. 


, " 2 


111.55 




« 3 


34.50 


No. 1 


" 4 


70.15 


u 2 


" 5 


59.80 


" 3 


" 6. . 


39.10 


" 4 


" 7 


71.30 


" 5 


1 " 8 


25.30 


" 6 


<l 9 


67.85 


" 7 


11 10 


21.85 


« 8 


" 11 


59.80 


" 9 


" 12 


18.40 


" 10 


" 13. 


19.55 




u 14 

'■■ 15 


89.70 
31.05 


Windham. 


*' 16 


34.50 




" 17 


89.70 


No 1 






" 2 


789 


8907.35 









42 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



Middletown. 


l 6 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


Chatham. 

East Middle Haddam... . 
Pine Brook 


■v £ 

,s.j| 


Amount of 
Dividend 
nt $1.15 
pro rata. 


First or Westfield : 

Second ** 


37 
46 
35 
44 
47 
51 
31 
30 
71 
37 
16 
28 
45 
65 
46 
52 
46 
54 
42 
1422 
143 


$42.55 
62. 9(. 
40.25 
60. 6f 
54.05 
58.65 
35.65 
34.5c 
81.65 
4-2.55 
18. 4( 
32. 2C 
51. 75 
74.75 
62. 9f: 
59. 8( 
52. 9( 
62. If 
48. 3f 
1.635. 3f 
164.45 


12 
17 
113 
79 
18 
37 
62 
33 
30 
20 
20 
20 


$13.80 
' 19.65 


Third u 


North West 


129.95 


Fourth ° 


Center 


90.85 


South StaddleHill 


Chestnut Hill 


20.70 


North " " 


North Center 


42.55 


Newfield 


West 


71.30 


Hubbard 


Clark's Hill 


37.96 


Farm Hill 


North 


34.60 


Bow Lane 


East, or Flanders 

Middle 


23.00 


Johnson's Lane 


23.00 


Haddam Road 


South East 


23.00 


Mora m us 

South Middlefield 

North " 

East " 

Falls. " 


Chester. 
North 




461 

65 
92 
44 

37 


$530.15 
74.75 


West Long Hill 

East " " 

City 


South 


106.80 


Center 

West , 


60.60 
42.65 


Miller's Farms 


Clinton. 

West 

Center 




238 

97 
64 
77 
34 
54 
18 


$273.70 

111.65 

73 60 


Cromwell. 


2388 

112 
92 
81 
79 
85 


$2,746.2f 

128.80 

105.80 

93.15 

90. 8f 

97.7; 




East 


88 55 


West 


Cow Hill 

Mill 


39.10 




62.10 
20.70 


Center 


North 


North West 


Essex. 
No. 1 






Durham. 


449 

56 
96 
53 
26 
23 
13 


$516.8; 

64.40 
110.40 
60.95 
29 . 90 
26.45 
14.95 


344 

60 
76 
75 
50 

47 
51 


$395.60 
69.00 


North 


i tt 2 




87.40 




•' 3 




86.25 




" 4 




57.50 
54.05 


South 


« 5 


West Side 


" 6 




58.K5 


SouthWest 






267 


1 $307.05 


359 


$412.85 



43 



East Haddam. 


c 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


Killingworth, continued. 
South West 


° a 

£ — 

£ 6 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at $1.15 
pro rata. 


No. 1 


36 
136 
37 
62 
45 
19 
30 
26 
126 
27 
31 
25 
12 
28 
14 
20 
71 


$41.40 
156.40 
42.55 
71.30 
51.75 
21.86 
34.90 
29 . 90 
144.90 
81.05 
35.65 
28.75 
13.80 
32.20 
16.10 
23.00 
81.65 


38 
11 

16 
10 


$43.70 
12.65 
18 40 


" 2 


Black Rock 


" 3 


* 4 


Nettleton . 


11 50 


" 5 


Old Saybrook. 
No. 1, Point 




" G 


198 

68 
64 
74 
64 


$227.70 


" 7 


" 8 


78.20 


" 9 


" 2, Oyster River 

" 3, Ferrv 

" 4, Center 


73 60 


" 10 


85 10 


" 11 


73.60 


" 12 


Portland. 
No. 1 




" 13 '.. 


270 

159 
553 
64 
68 
33 
116 
20 


$310.50 


% 14 


" 15 


182.85 


" 16 


« 2 


635.95 


" 17 


<( o 


73.60 




" 4 


66 70 


Haddam. 


745 

97 
47 
45 
39 
18 
29 
25 
26 
27 
22 
9 
30 
17 
45 


$856.75 

111.55 

54.05 
51.75 
44.85 
20.70 
33.36 
28.75 
29.90 
31.05 
25.30 
10.35 
34.50 
19.55 
51.75 


" 5 


37.95 




u 6 


13.3.40 


No. 1, Center 


" 7 


23.00 


" 2, Higganum,W. . 

" 3, Punsette 

" 4, Shailcrville. . . . 

" 5, Tu. key Hill 

" 6, Candlew'd Hill. 

" 7, TylerviUe 

" 8, Ilalklev Hill.... 
" 9, Brainard Hill.. 


Saybrook. 

No. 1, Deep River 

" 2, South " 

" 3, North " 

" 4 




1003 

71 
64 
76 
42 


$1,153.45 

81.65 
73.60 
87.40 
48.30 


Westbrook. 
No. 1, Center 




•' 10, Little City 

" 11, Beaver Meadow 
n 12, Burr 


253 

60 
21 
24 
32 
31 
47 
24 


$290.75 


" 13, Hiaganum,East. 


69.00 


" 14, Haddam Neck.. 


M 2, West 

" 3, Pond Meadow... 
" 4, North " ... 

u 5, Horse Hill. 

" 6, Hay den 

V 7, East ; 


24.15 
27.60 
36.80 
35.65 
54.05 
27.60 


Killingworth. 

Lane 

Center 


476 

S3 
81 
21 
38 


$547.40 

37.95 
35.65 
24.15 
43.70 


Chestnut Hill 


Union 1 


2391 


$274.85 



44 



TOLLAND COUNTY. 



Tolland. 
No. 1 


o c 
1° 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at £1.15 
pro rata. 


S( 

C 

II 
l> 

c 


• 

Columbia. 
orlh 


o - 


Amount of 
Dividend 

at >1.15 
pro rata. 


74 
30 
20 
13 
22 
12 
32 
30 
39 
26 
18 


$85.10 
34.50 
23.00 
14.95 
25.3d 
13.80 
36.80' 
34.50 
44.85 
29.90 
20.70 


3-2 
29 
16 
30 
49 
33 
34 


$3*. 80 




■ 2 


r est 


33.35 




■ 3 


>uth West 

lestnut Hill. . 


18.40 




' 4 


34.50 




' 5 


op River. . 


56.35 




' 6 


lie Street. . 


37.95 




' 7 and 9 


jnter. 


3910 




' 8 








' 10 


Ellington. 


223 


$256.45 




■ 11 






' 12 


N 


o. 1 


53 60.95 






' 2 


53 6i>.95 


Andover. 


316 

17 
34 
24 
26 


$363.40 

19.55 
39.10 
27.60 
29.90' 




; 3 


59 67.85 




' 4 


16 
31 
78 
15 
29 
28 


18.40 


Nc 
Ni 

So 
So 


>rth West 


' 5 


35.65 


>rth East. .• 


' 6. . 


89.70 


nth East 


' 7. . 


17.25 


uih West 


' 8 


33.35 




' 9 


32.20 




101 

47 
26 
49 
23 


$116.15 

54.05! 
29.90 j 
56 . 85 
Oft 4^ 








Co 

Sn 
N< 
So 


Bolton. 
nter 


Hebron, 


3C2 

40 
16 
13 
47 
28 
19 
26 
53 
23 
34 
26 

325 

42 
52 
28 
42 
26 


$416.30 


uth 


N 


o. 1 


46 00 


>rth 




' 2 


IS 40 


uth West 


1 3. . 


14 95 


nth " 


20 *>3 on 


' 4 

' 5 

' 6 


64 05 








32.20 
21 85 




165 

103 
53 
89 
31 
33 
43 
40 
36 
38 
25 


$189.75 

118.45 
60.95 

102.35; 
35.65 
37.95 
49.45 
46.00 
41 40 
43.70 
28 . 75 


H 


Coventry. 
■). 1 


! * 

1 8 South Giiead 

' 9 East " 

' 10 West " .... 
' 11 North " 


29.90 
60.95 
26.45 




1 2 


39.10 




' 3 


29.90 




' 4 


Mansfield. 






' 5 


$873.76 




* 6 






' 7 






' 8 


N T 


o. 1 


48.30 




' 9 


' 2 


59.80 




' 10 


' 3 


32.20 






< 4 


48 30 




491 


$564.05, 


' 6 


29.90 



45 



Mansfield, continued. 

No. 6 

" 7 

" 8 , 

" 9 ( No school) 

" 10 , 

" 11 , 

" 12 

" 13 , 

" 14 

" 15 , 

11 16 

Somers. 

No. 1 

" 2 

" 3 

41 4 

" 5 

" 6 

" 7 

M 8 

" 9 : 

" 10 

Stafford. 

No. 1 

" 2 

" 3 

" 4 

u 5 

" 6 

" 7 

" 8 

u 9 

M 10 

" 11 

u 1, West Society.. 

" 2 



® a 

i*-s 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at SI. 15 
pro rata. 


59 


$67.85 


49 


56.35 


35 


40.25 


17 


19.55 


13 


14.95 


29 


33.35 


18 


20.70 


34 


39.10 


21 


24.15 


14 


16.10 


479 


$550.85 


62 


71.30 


24 


27.60 


30 


34.50 


43 


49.45 


30 


34.50 


78 


89.70 


20 


23.00 


21 


24.15 


40 


46.00 


9 


10.35 


357 


$410.55 


90 


103.50 


136 


156.40 


110 


126.50 


33 


37.95 


10d 


125.35 


23 


26.45 


14 


16.10 


18 


20.70 


29 


33.35 


24 


27.60 


20 


23.00 


21 


24.15 


52 


59.80 


15 


17.25 



Stafford, continued. 

No. 4 

11 5 

" 6 

" 7 



Union. 



No. I, 

" 2. 

" 3. 

" 4. 

" 5. 

" 6. 



Vernon. 

Roctville East 

" West 

Vernon Center , 

South West 

South , 

South East 

North " '. 

West(No report) 

Willington. 



No. 1 
2 

3 
4 

5 
6 
7 

S 



&3 



22 


$25.30 


22 


25.30 


18 


20.70 


23 


26.45 


779 


$895.85 


60 


69.00 


22 


25.30 


29 


33.35 


21 


24.15 


13 


14.95 


21 


24.15 



166 



519 
204 
59 
81 
69 
24 
90 



1016 



°T2 o d 



$190.90 



596.85 
234.60 
67.85 
93.15 
79.35 
27.60 
103.50 



$1,202.90 

27.60 
43.70 
34.50 
24.15 
24.15 
26.45 
31.05 
44.85 
42.55 



260 $299.00 



46 



SUMMARY. 



COUNTIES. 


O 

<u c 

Is 


fa 


ti 

4/ Z. 

13 


Amount of 
Dividend 
at SI. 15 
pro rata. 




It 


Hartford County 


27 
24 
20 
23 
25 
16 
14 
13 


251 
210 
220 
246 
292 
169 
121 
125 


22,593 

24,197 

15,423 

19,595 

11,907 

8,350 

7,690 

6,070 


25,981.95 

27,826.55 

17,736.46 

22,534.25 

13,693.05 

9,602.50 

8,843.50 

5,830.50 


646 
1,169 
326 
726 
372 
112 
• 80 
142 


79 


New Haven " 


90 


New London " 


161 


Fairfield " 


142 


Litchfield u 


132 


Windham " 


273 


Middlesex M 


67 


Tolland " 


102 




162 


1,631 


114,825 


$132,048.75 


3,773 


1,046 



Whole number returned in 1864, 
1866, 

Increase of children in one year, 



112,098 
114,825 

2,727 



ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, 

TO THE 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 

MAY SESSION, 1865. 

WITH A CATALOGUE OF THE SCHOOL. 



frmto bjj ®rta af % f *gislataa 



NEW HAYEK: 
CARRINGTON & HOTCHKISS, STATE PRINTERS. 

1865. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 



FOR 1864-65. 



NAME. 


residence. 


COUNTY. 


FRANCIS GILLETTE, 


Hartford, 


Hartford. 


Term Expires, 


- 


1865. 


JAMES F. BABCOCK, 


New Haven, 


New Haven. 


Term Expires, 


- 


1868. 


HENRY P. HAVEN, 


New London, 


New London 


Tkrm Expires, 


- 


1866. 


ROGER S. AYERILL, 


Danbury, 


Fairfield. 


Term Expires, 


- 


1866. 


LEWIS WILLIAMS, 


POMFRET, 


Windham. 


Term Expires, 


. 


1867. 


JOSIAH G. BECKWITH, 


Litchfield, 


Litchfield. 


Term Expires, 


- 


1865. 


WILLIAM C. FOWLER, 


Durham, 


Middlesex. 


Term Expires, 


- 


1868. 


JOHN S. YEOMANS, 


Columbia, 


Tolland. 


Term Expires, 


. 


1867.. 



FRANCIS GILLETTE, President. 



DAVID N. CAMP, Secretary. 



. 



REPORT. 



Tc the Legislature of the State of Connecticut: 

The past year in the history of the State Normal School has 
been one of usual prosperity. Some changes have occurred in 
the corps of instruction, owing chiefly, as the Trustees under- 
stand, to the insufficiency of the salaries paid. Mr. Buckham, 
for several years the Associate Principal of the school, and for 
a longer period one of its most accomplished teachers, resigned 
his position at the close of the winter term of the preceding 
year, but was induced to remain until the end of the summer 
term. At that time Mr. John N. Bartlett, for many years 
the successful Principal of the schools of practice connected 
with the Normal school, and a life-long teacher of high stand- 
ing, was invited to take the place left vacant. Although 
causes have operated to throw serious embarrassment upon his 
efforts he has already shown himself to be master of his posi- 
tion, and given proof of the wisdom of the appointment. Mr. 
Ripley left at the close of the winter term, and no permanent 
successor has yet been found to take his place. While the 
Normal School is deprived of the services of these two devoted 
teachers it is gratifying to learn that they will still remain in 
the State, to pursue their valuable labors in the field of in- 
struction. With the inadequate sum annually appropriated 
for the support of the school, the Trustees find it difficult to 
command the services of such teachers as are necessary to ena- 
ble the institution to fulfill its noble purposes ; but having re- 
peatedly presented this subject in their reports, and asked for 



• 6 

an increase of fanda in these times of greatly increased ex- 
penses, they do not feel it to be their duty now to resume the 
subject. 

The whole nnmberof different pupils who have attended 
the school, during the past year, is . . 130 

During the Summer Term, . . . .73 

" " Autumn « .... TO 

" " Winter " . . . .83 

Number of new members, .... 73 

In the Senior Class there were . . . 31 

" u Middle " " " . . .52 

11 " Junior « '« «< . . . 56 

Xumber of Graduates, . . . .15 

The average age of the pupils in attendance, . 18. G 

The number of different towns represented, . . 6o 

The whole number of pupils who have been connected 
with the school since its organization, . . 2,2 IS 

The greatly increased price of board during the past year 
has doubtless operated to diminish the attendance somewhat, 
together with other causes connected with the state of the 
country. But, notwithstanding, the school has had an average 
number in attendance, and but a very few, if any more, could 
have been accommodated with board in its locality. 

Of the nineteen graduates of the class of lS^cJ, sixteen have 
been engaged the past year in teaching in the common schools 
of the State. Of forty-one in the senior class of that year 
thirty-nine have been teaching in the State, and sixty-eight of 
the lower classes have also been engaged in teaching, making 
one hundred ami twenty-three teachers known to Have gone 
forth from the Normal School, the past year, to prosecute their 
labors in the schools of the State. And it is supposed there 

ere others not heard from. 



Of their success, generally, we have gratifying and conclu- 
sive proof in the constantly increasing applications for Normal 
teachers from all parts of the State, notwithstanding the efforts 
which have been made in past J'ears, by a few persons, to ex- 
cite prejudice and hostility to the school. 

The expenses of the school during the year amount to 
$5,187.51. The several items which make this sum are thefol- 



ring : 




Salaries, 


83,705.02 


Repairs, . 


522.77 


Fuel, . . . 


315.00 


Printing and Stationery, . 


187.58 


Janitor, 


120.00 


Trustees' Expenses, 


50.00 


Library and Apparatus, 


99.97 


Postage and Expressage, . 


49.97 


Traveling and Incidentals, 


59.85 


Insurance, 


48.00 


Lecturers' Expenses, . 


21.35 


Water Pent, 


8.00 


Total, 


85,187.51 



The balance on hand at the close of the fiscal year, on the 
31st of last March, was $2,929.17. 

It was found necessary to expend for repairs during the year 
a sum considerably larger than the average expenditure for 
this purpose. Another item of unprecedented cost was fuel, 
the excess over that of the preceding year being more than 
one hundred dollars. The unusual amount of these two items 
alone will # account for the excess of the total expense of the 
school over its average cost in past years. 

The Trustees request an appropriation of 86,000, as in their 
opinion necessary to maintain the school properly, and enable 
them to pay reasonable and just compensations to its teachers. 
At this amount of expense to the State it would then be the 
cheapest Normal School in the country, and able to hold its 
acknowledged preeminence as the best. 



•8 

The vacancies in the Board of Trustees, to be filled by the 
appointment of the Legislature, occur in Hartford and Litch- 
field Counties. 

Annexed to this report will be found the reports of two of 
the Examining Committees of the school, showing its internal 
character and working, to which attention is invited. 

In behalf of the Board of Trustees this report is respectfully 
submitted to the Legislature. 

FRANCIS GILLETTE, Chairman. 

Hartford, April 26th, 1*65. 



Tlxe Reports of the Visiting Committees of the Normal School for 
the year ending in March, 1865. 

To Hon. Francis Gillette, President, &c. 

Sir : — In accordance with the vote of the Board, I visited, with 
others of the Trustees, the Normal School, July 18th and 19th, 
spending two full days in attendance on its sessions. 

The number of students during the summer term was seventy- 
three (73) — 8 males and 65 females. 

Besides the class recitations, the pupils appeared also as teachers, 
with their classes, from the schools below. Their examination 
therefore was both theoretical and practical. During these two 
days the graduating class were examined on the studies of the 
last year and acquitted themselves well. They showed a thorough 
and careful training in all branches. No one was pressed in un- 
due proportion as is often the case in school examinations, as if to 
make a pleasing exhibition, but the develo ment was well propor- 
tioned — a most desirable feature in a good education, especially 
that of a teacher. 

The junior and middle classes were examined in all the studies 
of the term. They proved that a good foundation was forming for 
a thorough education. Indeed, thoroughness seemed to be a char- 
acteristic of all the classes. * 

No one thing was more marked than the great difference be- 
tween the junior and senior classes. The one coming from 
schools where poorer instruction is given were evidently not 
all " qualified to teach," but it was onjy necessary to turn to 
seniors to find the same kind of material so chansred that one 
would scarcely recognize it as of the same origin. 

Another marked feature was this — Teaching was not made to 
consist in simply explaining what is found in the text-book — 
much less in reciting the words, but the principle underlying all 
the instruction given seemed to be that teaching is cultivating the 
mind — training it — not merely filling it with facts, as a store- 
house is filled with goods, or as a vessel is laden with her cargo. 



10 

II , a marked diff ind between dif- 

ferent members of the class, l»ut, as nearly as I ran j 
difference than in academies or big] era! man- 

agement of the Bchool has tended more than usual to check this 
ever present evil, and to develop Life an m all. If in our 

highest literary institutions some are found who never shine as 
lights in the world, it is a just cause of pride that so few, i 
cially of the graduates of this institution, are found who are not 
valuable members of their chosen profession. 

Turning to the other Bide of the picture, I think one oft he great- 
est detects in the general appearance of the school, was an i 
utterance of an idea, sometimes indistinctly poss — d, but often 
only faintly uttered. Faint and indistinct utterance tends to a 
feeble grasp of truth, while it is the duty of every teacher to hold 
the truth with a firm grasp, and express it with a force and clear- 
MBB that proves an unquestioned ownership. 

Having been in other kinds of schools somewhat both as teacher 
and as visitor, my only wish as to those (if there are any) who have 
doubts as to Normal Schools generally, and ours in particular, is, 
that they would come and see for themselves the evidence of its 
worth. I will not speak of individuals, either teachers or pupils, 
where so much to praise is seen, and where so little is found 
worthv of unfavorable criticism. 

LEWIS WILLIAMS. 

Pomfeet, March IS, 1S65. 



11 



To Hon. Francis Gillette, 

Chairman : 

The undersigned, apppointed by the Board of Trustees a Com- 
mittee to visit the Normal School during the Winter Term for 
1864-5, respectfully report, 

That they attended to the duty on the 13th day of December 
last. 

On entering the Hall we missed the pleasant faces of the asso- 
ciate Principal and lady assistant, so long connected with the In- 
stitution, but Professor Bartlett and Miss Marshall, whom we 
found properly installed in the vacated places, soon welcomed us, 
and we were happy on examination, to find the usual order, ex- 
ercises and efficiency of the school still maintained. 

We spent the entire day in the school, and were favored with 
hearing recitations from various classes, as follows : 

Theory and Practice of Teaching by Prof. Bartlett, 

Astronomy by Prof. Bartlett. 

Mental Philosophy by Prof. Camp. 

Reading by Prof. Camp. 

Arithmetic by Prof. Ripley. 

Latin by Prof. Ripley. 

English Literature by Prof. Ripley. 

Geography by Miss Marshall. 

Latin by Miss Marshall. 

English History by Miss Marshall. 
And we also visited the Model Schools, in which many of the 
pupils of the Normal School were engaged in teaching classes 
under the supervision of the Faculty of the Institution. 

We found but very few gentlemen connected with the Normal 
School, the demand for teachers having induced several of those 



12 

who intended to accept of favorable openings to take charge of 
Winter schools, to leave earlier in the term. It is unnecessary for 
ns to particularize the individual exercises to which we listened 
We met with much to approve and found opportunity to throw 
out some suggestions looking to farther improvements, which 
were cordially received by the Principal. 

We were highly pleased with the senior class, and have ever in 
our visits to the Normal School been gratified with the maturity 
of thought as well as knowledge and discipline found exercised 
by those pupils who remain for a long time in the School, and 
thus receive its full advantages. 

We trust it will be the aim and desire of every pupil that 
attends the institution, to complete the course, and graduate at 
the Normal School. 

From what we saw of the junior class, we could not say that 
all its members had that ground-work laid in the common 
branches of English education, which would fully fit them to 
enter and receive the advantages of the instruction of the Normal 
School. 

The responsibility rests with the Board of Visitors, in each 
town, of sending only such pupils as have a fair knowledge of the 
branches usually taught in Public Schools. 

We commend the School anew to the care and patronage of the 
Commonwealth, being every year more and more fully satisfied 
that its advantages to our whole educational system, repays 
more than a hundred times the call from the Treasury for the 
annual expenses of the school. 

HENRY P. HAVEN, ) 

ROGER S. AVERILL, J Committee - 

New London, January, 1865. 



FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION, 



DAVID N. CAMP, A. M., 

Principal of Normal School, Superintendent of Common 
Schools, and Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy, 
and the Theory and Practice of Teaching. 

JOHN N. BAETLETT, 

Associate Principal, and Professor of the English Language 
and Literature, and Natural Philosophy. 

C. HOLCOMB, 

Professor of Mathematics and Teacher of Latin. 

B. N. COMINGS, M.D., 

Professor of Physiology, Chemistry, and Natural History. 

LOUIS BAIL, 
Professor of Drawing. 

HABEIET N. MABSHALL, 
Teacher of Geography and History. 

KALPH G. HIBBABD, 

Teacher of Reading. 

C. W. HUNTINGTON, 

Teacher of Piano and Melodeon. 



MODEL SCHOOL. 



PRINCIPAL. 

J. K. CREEVEY, 



PERMANENT TEACHERS. 
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT, 

J. K CREEVEY, 
CAROLINE A. STICKNEY. 



GRAMMAR DEPARTMENT, 

SUSAN M. MARTIN, 
CARRIE T. CARY. 



INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT, 

MARTHA G. LEWIS, 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT, 

LUCY A. TRACY. 



GRADUATES. 



LADIES. 

NAMES. POST OFFICE ADDRESS. 

Sarah J. Arnold, Hartford. 

Prudence M. Butler, - Stonington. 

Kathleen Brockway, - Hamburg. 

Addie P. Campbell, New Britain. 

Carrie T. Cary, - - - - Scotland. 

Mary J. Corbin, New Britain. 

Carrie F. Dayton, Hartford. 

Olive D. Gallup, ----- Collaraer. 

Sarah D. Hartson, -■-"-■"- Meriden, 

Laura Stone, Plainfield, 

Julia E. Steele, - - - - - New Britain, 

Susan A. Steele, New Hartford. 

Celia I. Stuart, Central Village. 



GENTLEMEN. 
Henry S. Chittenden, .... North Guilford. 
Daniel W. Rossiter, - North Guilford. 
Total Graduates, 15 



1G 



SENIOR CLASS. 



LADIES. 

NAMES. 

M:iry E. Allen, 
Sarah J. Arnold, - 
Kathleen Brock way, 
Mary J. Brown, - 
Prudence M. Butler, 
Addie P. Campbell, 
Carrie T. Cary, 
Mary J. Corbin, - 
Helen W. Cristy, 
Carrie F. Dayton, 
Marion R. Ellis, 
Olive D. Gallup, - , 
Sarah D. Hartson, 
Fannie Hotchkiss, 
Mary L. Lee, 
Lucy TV. Patterson, 
Helen P. Porter, 
Julia E. Steele, 
Susan A. Steele, 
Emma J. Stone, - 
Laura Stone, - 

Celia I. Stuart, 
M. Louise Studwell, - 
Maria L. Turner, 
Sarah J. Wadhams, - 
Caroline E. Williams, 

GENTLEMEN. 
Henry S. Chittenden, 
Clarence TV. Colton, 
Amos F. Palmer, 
Daniel TV. Rossiter, 
John O. Smith, 

Total — Senior Class, 



TOST OFFICE ADDRESS. 

Westminster. 
Hartford. 
Hamburg. 
North Haven. 
Stonington. . 
New Britain. 
Scotland, 
New Britain. 

Greenwich. 
Hartford. 
New Britain. 

Collamer. 
Meriden. 
Kensington. 
New Haven. 
New Haven. 

West Cheshire. 
New Britain. 
New Hartford. 
Milford. 
Plain field. 

Central Village. 

Greenwich. 
Fair Haven. 

Goshen. 
Rocky Hill, 



North Guilford. 
West Hartford. 
Jewett City. 

X<>rth Guilford. 
Jewett City. 

31 



17 



MIDDLE CLASS. 



LADIES. 



NAMES. 

Clara Adams, 
Jennie L. Andrews, 
Jennie N. Atwood, - 
Sophie A. Baird, - 
E. Angnsta Baldwin, 
Julia E. Bassette, 
Lucy H. Bishop, 
Florence Boardman, 
Julia E. Brooks, 
Emily S. Brown, 
Abbie M. Bunce, 
Lottie D. Butler, 
Susan B. Case, 
Josephine A. Clark, 
Mary A. Comstock, - 
Caddie A. Cutler, 
Eudoxia A. De Wolfe, 
Mary P. Hart, 
Mary Jewell, 
Martha Jewell, - 
Hattie E. Judson, 
Annie G. Kennedy, 
Elizabeth C. Kirk, - 
Alice E. Longley, 
Ella Luther, - 
Julia M. Lyman, - 
Lucy F. Nichols, 
Emeline Palmer, - 
Mattie F. Pease, 
Eleanor M. Porter, 
Rebecca H. Robinson, 
Alice J. Rowe, - 
Gertrude Scofield, 
Lois L. Sears, 
Ella C. Smith, 
Elizabeth J. Stevens, 



POST OFFICE ADDRESS. 

Stamford. 
JVew Britain. 
Bristol. 
Milford. 
. Bradford. 
JVew Britain^. 
Sprague. 
Middlefteld. 
JVew Hartford. 
Stamford. 
Burnside. 
Stonington. 
Plainville. 
Middletown. 
Center BrooJc. 
Stonington. 
West BrooJc. 
Plainville. 
Winchester, JV. H. 
Winchester, JV. H. 
Woodbury. 
JVew Haven. 
Waterbury. 
Hartford. 
JVew Britain. 
JVorthfield. 
JVew Britain. 
Stonington. 
JVew Britain. 
Waterbury. 
Br an ford. 
Fair Haven. 
Stamford. 
Sharon. 
JVew Haven. 
Lisbon. 



18 



NAMES. 

Althea M. Serry, - - - 

M. Adelia Viets, - 

Kate L. Warren, 

Hatttie M. Wolcott, 

Caroline Wood, 

Ellen E. Woodford, 

Lucy A. Woodhouse, 

GENTLEMEN. 
William W. Davenport, - 
John N. Green, - 

George W. Harris, 
Charles T. Jewett, 
Julius II. Pease, - 
Judson C. Porter, ... 
David C. Tyler, - - - • 

Frederic D. Winton, 
Andrew J. Sloper, 

Total — Middle Class, 



POST OFICE ADDRESS. 

Ansonia. 

New Britain. 

New Britain. 

Wethersfield. 

Clinton. 

Avon. 

lib ether sfield. 



North Stamford. 
Putnam. 
I/a rtford. 
Middlefield. 
New Britain. 
New Britain. 
East Iladdam. 
Colchester. 
New Britain. 

52 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



LADIES. 



NAMES. 

Laura A. Albray, 
Lucy G. Angell, - 
Ellen J. Atwood, 
Mary E. Baldwin, 
Rosa Bates, - 
Charlotte E. Bishop, 
Hattie S. Bissell, 
L. P. Maria Brown, 
Ursula M. Brainard, 
Alice C. Bunce, - 
AdeleL. Burkhart, • 
Julia A, Carrington, 
Philena J. Carter, 



TOST OFFICE ADDRESS. 

Wet her sfield. 

Central Village. 

Watertown. 
Pomfret, 

\Yas1dn<jton,D.C. 
Hartford. 
Burrville. 
East Iladdam. 
Thompsonville. 
Burnside, 
Hartford. 
Milford. 
Pleasant Valley. 






19 



Rosa E. Chapin, - 
Mattie R. Coc, 
Mary Cooke, 
Phebe E. Dudley, - 
Deborah H. Edw«ards, 
Sarah A. Fowler, 
Margaret Gartland, 
Piera R. Griswold, - 
Jennie C. Hall, 
Ruth H. Hills, 
Lottie J. Hull, 
Phebe Hungerford, - 
Mary L. Huxley, - 
Georgian a E. Jaqua, 
Esther E. Judson, 
Jennie Kilbourne, 
Nellie M. Lord, - 
Emma Luther, 
Adelia Manchester, 
Maggie A. Morgan, - 
Lizzie B. Palmer, 
Lydia C. Palmer, • - 
Martha Parkhurst, 
Helen J. Peck, 
Helen L. Perkins, 
Mnry A. Pierson, 
Hattie L. Rising, 
Carrie W. Robbins, - 
Nellie L. Roberts, 
Hannah G. Root, 
Sarah G. Rowe, 
Martha M. Smith, 
Annie E. Staples, 
Lucy E. Starr, 
Elizabeth II. Upson, - 
Ella G. Wadsworth, 
Etta White, - 
Marietta L. Whiting, 
Hattie M. Woodhouse, 



POST OFFICE ADDDItESS. 

Hockville. 
Stony Creek. 
Wallingfi.rdi 

North Guilford. 

Glastenbury. 
Fair Haven. 
New Britain. 
Durham. 

Winchester. 

Glastenbury. 

Quakers Farms. 

Gaylordsville. 

Goshen. 

Winchester Center. 

Bethlehem. 

Bantam Falls. 

Essex. 

New Britain. 

Plainville. 

New Haven. 

Stonington. 

Plain field. 

Baltic. 

Forestville, 

Fair Haven. 

Bridgeport. 

West Suffield. 

West Hartford. 
New Britain. 
Kensington. 
Fair Haven. 

West Haven. 
New Britain. 
Cromwell. 
Southington. 

Wether sfield. 
New Hartford. 
Winchester Center. 
Wethersfield. 



20 



GENTLEMEN. 

NAMES. 

Henry R. At water, 
Philo J. Downs, 
William J. Hills, - 
Thomas OdeH, 

Total — Junior Class, 



POST OFFICE ADDRESS. 

Bethany. 

Sandy Hook. 
Plainville. 
New Britain. 

56 



SUMMARY 



Graduates, 
Senior Class, - 
Middle Class, 
Junior Class, 

Total, 

Number of pupils in Summer Session, 
Number of pupils in Autumn Session, 
Number of pupils in Winter Session, 

Aggregate, - 



15 



31 

52 
56 

139 

73 
70 

83 

226 



CIRCULAR. 



ESTABLISHMENT AND ORGANIZATION". 

The State Normal School or Seminary, for the training of 
teachers in the art of teaching and governing the Common 
Schools of Connecticut, was established by act of the Legis- 
lature, May Session, 1849. 

The entire management of the Institution, as to the appli- 
cation of its funds, the location of the school, the regulation 
of the studies and exercises, and the granting of diplomas, 
is committed to a Board of Trustees, consisting of the Super- 
intendent of Common Schools, ex officio, and one member 
for each of the eight counties of the State. The Trustees 
are appointed by the Legislature, two in each year, and hold 
their office for the term of four years, without compensation 
for services. The Board must submit an annual report as 
to their own doings, and the progress and condition of the 
Seminary. 

On the first of February, 1850, the Normal School was 
permanently located at New Britain. 

This location was selected on account of its central posi- 
tion and its accessibility from every section of the State by 
railroads, and also in consideration of the liberal offer on the 
part of the citizens of the town to provide a suitable build- 
ing, apparatus and library, for the use of the Normal School, 
and to place all the schools of the village under the manage- 
ment of the Principal of the Normal School, as schools of 
practice. 



22 

The school was opened for the reception of pupils, on 
Wednesday, the 15th of May, 1850, since which time, two 
thousand two hundred and eighteen pnpils have been con- 
nected with the school. 



OBJECT AND AIM. 

The design of the Normal School, as set forth in the Act of 
Incorporation, is the training of teachers in the art of teach- 
ing and governing Common Schools. Its objects are distinct 
from those of Academies, High Schools and Colleges, and in 
its operations it aims to perform a work not secured or 
attempted by any other educational institution in the State. 
It bears the same relation to the all-important work of teach- 
ing that theological, law and medical schools do, to the cleri- 
cal, legal and medical professions. 

The demand for teachers trained in this institution has 
been steadily increasing, till a large number of the schools 
of the State are supplied directly from the Normal SchooL 

It is the aim of the school to furnish the State with teach- 
ers of a high grade of qualification, and the course of in- 
struction has been laid out with reference to the wants of 
those persons who intend to engage permanently in the busi- 
ness of teaching, while, at the same time, it is designed to 
furnish important advantages to those teachers who can 
spend but one or two terms at the school. 

CLASSIFICATION. 

The course of study is designed to occupy three years, 
and the school is divided into three classes: Junior, Middle 
and Senior. Upon entering the school, pnpils are examined 
in Grammar, Arithmetic, Geography, History of the United 
States, Heading, Writing and Spelling. The object of this 
examination is to ascertain whether the pupil needs to review 
those studies. For this purpose, printed questions on all the 
above subjects but Spelling, Heading and Writing, are given 
to the pupil, and he is required to answer them in writing. 
If less than three-fourths of the questions be answered, or if 



the papers written show, in any way, a need of further re- 
view of those studies, the pupil is expected to remain at 
least one term in the Junior Class, otherwise he enters the 
Middle Class at once. 

If any who have been admitted to the Middle Class desire 
to enter the Senior Class, they may do so by passing a satisfac- 
tory examination, conducted in the same manner in the 
studies pursued by the Middle Class. 

It will be obvious that it requires a much lower grade of 
qualifications to enter an advance class at the beginning of 
the school year than at any other time. Pupils entering the 
school the Winter or Summer Sessions should be acquainted 
with all which the class they join has passed over from the 
beginning of the Autumn Session. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

The course of instruction and training includes : 

First. A general review of the studies required by law of 
Common School Teachers. This is not required of those who 
are found competent in these studies when they enter the 
school. 

Second. A course of advanced studies, designed for mental 
discipline and as a preparation for High Schools and the higher 
departments of Graded Schools. 

Third. Special instruction in Mental and Moral Science, 
with reference to lessons in the science of Education and the 
art of Teaching. 

Fourth. Instruction in School Organization, and Discipline, 
in the School Laws, and in the powers and duties of teachers 
and school officers. 

Fifth. Lectures on the different branches of Natural Science 
and their application to the arts of life, and on the Philosophy 
of Education and Methods of Instruction. 

Sixth. "Teaching Exercises" given by the students, while 
the members of the Normal School are considered pupils, — or 
more generally with classes of children taken from the Model 
School, and taught in the Normal Hall in the presence of the 
Normal School. 



24 

Seventh. Observation and practice in the Model and Experi- 
mental School. This school includes pupils in all stages of 
advancement from the Primary to the High School. 

Tuition is free in all the regular classes and studies of the 
school. Pupils who desire it can receive lessons in instru- 
mental music by paying the usual tuition. 

STUDIES OF THE JUNIOR GCLA88. 

Reading, Orthography and Phonetic Analysis; Geography 
and Map Drawing ; English Grammar and Composition ; 
Analysis ; Arithmetic, Oral and Written ; History of the 
United States ; Mechanics ; Algebra ; Drawing with Pencil 
and Crayon ; Yocal Music ; Declamation. 

STUDIES OF THE CUDDLE CLASS. 

Rhetorical Reading, comprising Analysis of the Language, 
Grammar and style of the best English Authors, their errors 
and beauties ; Orthography, with Phonetic and Etymological 
Analysis; English Grammar, with Analysis of Sentences; 
Composition and Declamation; Algebra; Arithmetic reviewed ; 
Physical Geography; Physiology and Hygiene; History; 
Natural Philosophy ; Astronomy, with the use of Globes ; 
Geometry ; Psychology ; Drawing continued ; Yocal Music. 

STUDIES OF THE SENIOR CLASS. 

Rhetorical Reading. Orthography, and Critical Phonetic and 
Etymological Analysis continued ; Composition and Declama- 
tion ; Logic, Mental Philosophy, Moral Philosophy, English 
Literature and Rhetoric ; Evidences of Revealed Religion and 
Natural Theology ; Geometry and Trigonometry ; Chemistry, 
Botany and Meteorology ; Rhetorical Analysis of " Paradise 
Lost ; " Drawing ; Art of Teaching ; Yocal Music. 

Instruction is given, if desired, in the French, German, 
Latin and Greek languages. Pencil and Crayon Drawing is 
taught by an accomplished Professor, and also Yocal Music. 

Lectures are given on Mineralogy, Geology, Botany, As- 
tronomy, PhysiDlogy, and the Science of Education. 



25 

Physical exercise is required as a regular school duty. 
During part of the year, all the pupils practice Calisthenics, 
under the direction of one of the teachers, with such instru- 
ments — dumb-bells, etc., &c. — as can be used in the school- 
room ; and during the remainder of the year may take their 
choice between these and out-door exercise. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

The Library of Text-Pooks, belonging to the school, numbers 
upwards of four thousand volumes. At a small charge, the 
pupils are allowed the use of such Text-Books as they need, 
and are thus relieved from the necessity of purchasing. 

APPARATUS. 

The school is provided with globes, maps, charts, diagrams 
and collections of objects for the study of Natural History. It 
has also apparatus for the illustration of Chemistry and Natural 
Philosophy. The pupil will be taught the use of Holbrook's 
Common School Apparatus. 

LIBRARY. 

The school is furnished with the best works on the theory 
and practice of education, which the Normal pupils are 
expected to read, and on some of which they are examined. 
The Library has recently been increased by the addition of the 
best standard works in English literature, and the members of 
the school have free access to the best dictionaries and 
ency eloped ias in the language. 

The Reading Room is supplied with most of the educational 
periodicals published in this country, and is open at certain 
hours of the day to all the members of the school. 

ADMISSION OF PUPILS. 

Pupils are admitted only at the beginning of a term, and 
they are required to remain through the term upon which 
they commence, except in the Autumn term, when pupils who 
are to teach in the Winter will be excused to leave before the 
expiration of the term. 



20 

The highest number of pupils which can be received in any 
one term is two hundred and twenty 

Each town is entitled to have one pupil in the school. Un- 
til, however, the whole number of pupils in actual attendance 
shall reach the highest number fixed by law, the Principal is 
authorized to receive all applicants who may present them- 
selves duly recommended by the School Visitors of their 
respective towns. 

Any person, either male or female, may apply to the School 
Visitors of any town for admission to the school, by making a 
written declaration that "his [or her] object in so applying is 
to qualify himself [or herself] for the employment of a com- 
mon school teacher ; and that it is his [or her] intention to 
engage in that employment in this State." 

FORM OF APPLICATION. 

[Date.] 
To the School Visitors of 
I hereby respectfully signify my desire to procure a Certifi- 
cate of Recommendation for admission to the State formal 
School. 

And I hereby declare that my object in seeking admission 
to the school is to qualify myself for the employment of a 
Common School Teacher, and that it is my intention to engage 
in that employment in this State. 

[Signature.] 

The School Visitors are authorized to grant a Certificate of 
Admission to the school to any person who shall have been 
found, on examination by them, possessed of the qualifications 
required of teachers of Common Schools in this State, and 
suitable in respect to age, character, talents and attainments, 
to be received as a pupil in the Normal School. 

As the usefulness of the school depends in a great measure 
•upon the character and qualifications of the persons recom- 
mended, the School Visitors are particularly requested to 
select, as far as possible, candidates who possess strength of 
moral and religious character, good health, cheerful spirits, 



27 

and agreeable manners — who have a love for the occupations 
ot the school-room, and who can sympathize with children, 
and engage earnestly in the work of education. 

CERTIFICATE OF RECOMMENDATION. 

The following is the form of Certificate which should be 
given by the School Visitors to the Candidates whom they 
recommend for admission. 

[Date.] 
This is to certify, That 
has been examined by the School Visitors of 

and approved as possessed of the qualifications 
required of teachers of Common Schools in this State, and 
that he [or she] is hereby recommended by the said Visitors 
to the Trustees of the State Normal School, as a suitable 
person, by his [or her] age, character, talents and attainments, 
to be received as a pupil in" that Institution. 

[Signed by the Chairman or Acting Visitor.] 

Applicants duly recommended by the said Visitors, can 
forward their Certificate directly to the Principal of the Nor- 
mal School at new Britain, who will inform them of the time 
when they must report themselves, to be admitted to any 
vacant place in the school. 

All persons once regularly admitted to the school, can 
remain connected with the same for three years, and will not 
lose their places by temporary absence in teaching Common 
Schools in this State — such experience, in connection with the 
instruction of the Institution, being: considered a desirable 
part of a teacher's training. 



^ 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

There are three terms in each year. The first, or Autumn 
Term, commences on the third Tuesday of September, and 
continues till the last school-day before the 25th of December. 

The second, or Winter Term, commences on the second 
school-clay in January, and continues till the last Friday in 
March. 



23 

The third, or Spring Term, commences on the third Tuesday 
in April, and continues till the last Thursday but two in July. 
Next Anniversary, Thursday, July 13, 1S65. 

BOARD. 

Pupils must board in such families and be subject to such 
regulations in their boarding-places as the faculty may direct. 
Arrangements are made for pupils to live with private fami- 
lies exclusively. Suitable accommodations will be provided 
for those who desire it on their making application for the 
same at least ten days before the beginning of a term. The 
price of board is from s to § a week, including washing 
and lights. As the work of school is sufficient to occupy the 
pupil's time fully, it is generally not best that anything else 
should engage his attention ; but, to a limited extent, when 
circumstances make it necessary, arrangements can be made 
for pupils boarding themselves, or for part payment of board 
by work. 

TEACHERS FOR COMMON SCHOOLS. 

School Committees desiring to secure competent teachers, 
and who wish to employ these trained in the Normal School, 
are requested to address the Principal, stating the terms to be 
offered and the qualifications required. !Xo pains will be 
spared to secure for any post designated, a competent teacher. 

As applications for teachers are numerous in Spring and 
Autumn, it ia desirable that such applications be made, when 
convenient, sometime before the teacher is needed. 

The Board of Trustees, or the Faculty of the School, cannot 
be held responsible for the success of those teachers who are 
employed upon the mere representation that they have been 
Normal Pupils. 



Contributions of books, pamplets and papers for the Library 
and Reading Room, and of minerals, shells and other speci- 
mens of natural history, and objects of interest for the Cabinet 
and Museum, will be gratefully received. 






REPORT 



fljmntafajri 0f €mmm Sbttynh, 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 



MAT SESSION, 1865. 



frintefc bg ©rttr of % f*plato. 



NEW HAVEN: 
CARRINGTON & HOTCHKISS, STATE PRINTERS. 

1865. 



EEPOET, 



To the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut : 

In compliance with the statutes relating to education, I here- 
with respectfully submit to your Honorable Body, the Twen- 
tieth Annual Report of the Superintendent of Common 
Schools : — 

In the last annual report from this office, the school laws 
were collected and accompanied with such explanatory notes 
as seemed necessary to'make their operation well understood. 
Three hundred copies of the laws were also published separate 
from the report. The demand for that report, and for the 
pamphlet containing the school laws, evinces the desire of 
school officers to become acquainted with the requirements of 
the laws relating to common schools. 

When the revision of the statutes, provided for by the last 
General Assembly, shall be completed, it is hoped that a new 
compilation of the school laws will be made and sent to each 
school district in the State. So far as the requirements of the 
laws are understood, I believe that the school officers of the 
State are desirous of complying with the letter and spirit of 
the same, and that the people will usually be found ready to 
proceed as far in improving schools as the law requires. In 
many places public sentiment is quite in advance of legislation 
in this respect. 

The applications for official opinions upon different portions 
of the law become less frequent as the law is better understood, 



but the consideration of these applications and the preparation 
of answers to them still require considerable time of the Super- 
intendent. It is believed that the explanations and decisions 
given have often prevented expensive and vexatious litigation, 
and have also helped to secure more uniform action in the ad- 
ministration of the school system. 

The applications for school money from districts which bad 
forfeited the same, are annually diminishing in number. This 
indicates a more uniform compliance with the provisions of the 
law. 

The reports and returns from the school visitors of the differ- 
ent towns show a gradual but constant improvement in the con- 
dition of common schools. The evidence of progress will be 
exhibited under the different heads of this report, and they 
may also be found in the extracts from the reports of school 
visitors and in the statistical table made up from the official 
returns. (See Appendix, A. and F.) 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

The number of new school houses erected the past year is 
twenty-six. About the same number of houses before existing 
have been thoroughly repaired, and in some instances en- 
larged. 

The amount which has been expended for new school houses 
is $74,457, and for repairs, $21,360, making the aggregate ex- 
pended for the improvement of school houses the past year, 
$95,817, an increase of $62,281 over the amount reported for 
1863. The number of school houses reported in good condi- 
tion is 1,335, an increase of 51 over the number so reported in 
1863. 

The number of school houses reported in bad condition is 
295 ; the number with enclosed yards is 25J. Many of these 
yards are beautified with shade and ornamental trees. The 
taste exhibited in the erection of buildings and the laying out 
of grounds is an encouraging feature of the improvement in 
school houses and yards. The relative percentage of good 
school houses in the different counties, when compared with the 
whole number in those counties, is as follows : — In Hartford 



County, 88 per cent. ; New Haven County, 86 per cent. ; New 
London County, 80 per cent. ; Fairfield County, 79 per cent. ; 
Litchfield County, 79 per cent. ; Windham County, 83 per 
cent. ; Middlesex County, 91 per cent., and in Tolland County, 
64 per cent. In the State it is about 82 per cent. The number 
of school houses, with enclosed yards, is, in Hartford County, 
92 ; in New Haven County, 48 ; in New London County, 26 ; 
in Fairfield County, 34 ; in Litchfield County, 21 ; in Wind- 
ham County, 3 ; in Middlesex County, 15 ; and in Tolland 
County, 12. The necessity for enclosures connected with school 
houses is much more imperative in cities and villages than in 
country districts, but even in the latter it is desirable that 
every school house should have an enclosed yard. 

The increased expense of erecting school buildings and mak- 
ing the necessary provision for the health and comfort of teach- 
ers and pupils, has, in some instances, led to the neglect of re- 
pairs and improvements, which have been greatly demanded. 
For a few years previous to the commencement of the present 
war the change which was taking place was rapidly displacing 
the old, uncomfortable school houses, and securing in their 
place, neat, tasteful, and convenient structures. For the three 
years, from 1858 to 1860, inclusive, there were 190 new school 
houses built, or, an average of 63 annually ; and the expendi- 
ture for building and repairs in that time was $278,975, or an 
average of $92,992, annually. In 1861 there were 44 new 
school houses built; in 1862, 31 ; and in 1863, but 23. But as 
already remarked a new impulse has been given and more im- 
provement has been made the past year. 

One of the finest school buildings erected the past year, and 
one of the best in the State, is the D wight school building, at 
New Haven. A large and commodious house has been com- 
pleted and opened in Willimantic since the school year closed 
and the returns were made. 

In 738 districts the school houses are supplied with some 
articles of school apparatus, in some cases with full sets of phi- 
losophical and chemical apparatus, and with good cabinets of 
minerals. Outline maps are furnished in 925 schools ; in some 
of these schools there are also good reference maps. 



The school law provides that " no district shall be entitled to 
receive any money from the school fund of the State unless 
such district shall be supplied with a school house, and out- 
buildings pertaining thereto, which shall be satisfactory to the 
Board of School Visitors." The enforcement of this require- 
ment has resulted in giving to some districts new and conven- 
ient school buildings. In forty-five town9 the school houses 
are all reported good. It is believed that vigilance on the part 
of school visitors and district committees would soon procure 
adequate accommodations in all the districts of the State. 
Some additional legislation may be needed to secure this result. 

ATTENDANCE. 

The number of persons registered as pupils in common 
schools, for the year 1863-64, was as follows : — Winter term : 
boys, 40,849 — decrease, 116; girls, 36,277 — increase, 1,035; 
aggregate increase in winter, 919. Summer term : boys, 
33,166— increase 1,233 ; girls, 35,591— decrease, 9S2 ; aggre- 
gate increase in summer, 251. 

The average attendance in the winter term was 55,361, or 
72 per cent, of the number registered, and in summer, 17,771, 
or 69 per cent, of the number registered for this term. 

If to the number registered in the winter term there be added 
the number of those who attended in the summer who were 
not connected with the winter schools, there would be a total of 
90,937, as the number of different individuals who were con- 
nected with common schools as pupils for some part of the 
year. 

The demand for workmen and the increasing prosperity of 
business in manufacturing districts, have withdrawn many 
children from the schools to labor in the mills. There are 
many cases within the knowledge of the Superintendent, and 
no doubt many others in the State, where children are thus 
employed in direct violation of the law which provides that 
" no child under the age of fifteen years shall be employed to 
labor in any manufacturing establishment, or in any other busi- 
ness, in this State, unless such child shall have attended some 



public or private day school at least three months of the twelve 
next preceding any and every year in which such child shall 
be so employed." 

Some children of four and five years of age are wisely kept 
at home to be educated while so young. The careful training 
of kind and judicious parents, who are watchful and faithful 
in the development of the faculties of their children at this 
early age, may be better than the educational influences af- 
forded by most of our schools. Other things, such as prevail- 
ing sickness in some localities, want of suitable school rooms, 
and efficient teachers, are sometimes the cause of irregular at- 
tendance, and temporary absence for a term or two. But when 
due allowance is made for all these instances of justifiable ab- 
sence there will still be found many of school age, who should 
be in school, not there any portion of the year. 

Common schools are State institutions, organized under State 
direction, and supported, to a great extent, from the State 
treasury, or from taxes collected by State authority. The prin- 
ciple which justifies this relation and the exercise of this au- 
thority, is that education is necessary for the good of the State, 
and for the welfare of society which the State is bound to pro- 
tect. The schools accomplish the object for which they were 
organized, mainly, by receiving the children of school age and 
educating them for the responsibilities which are to devolve 
upon them as citizens of the State and members of society. If 
children do not attend school the object is not accomplished. 
It is a question which has already received the attention of 
legislative bodies in other states and countries, and which may 
press itself forcibly upon your Honorable body, whether the 
safety of the State and the best interests of society do not re- 
quire that some measures shall be adopted which shall insure 
the attendance of all of school age not justifiably absent. 
The services of the older children may be of some value to the 
parent or employer now, but it is not a wise arrangement, or 
one just to the child or the State, which robs one of his birth- 
right under a free, intelligent government, or the other of the 
power, security, and wealth which educated minds bring. 



MEANS FOR THE SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 

The common schools of the State are supported by money 
derived from the following different sources : — 

1st. Income of School Fund. — The amount received from 
the school fund in 1864 was $134,311. This amount varies a 
little in the aggregate from year to year, but as the number of 
children increase the amount divided per capita must sensibly 
diminish. Thus a district numbering forty persons between 
the ages of four and sixteen, in 1849, received sixty dollars, 
while the present year a similar district receives but forty-six 
dollars, though the amount of dividend from the school fund is 
as large now as then. 

2nd. Income from Town Deposit Fund. — The amount re- 
ceived from this fund is about §45,000, varying but little from 
year to year, but the per capita distribution is much larger in 
the agricultural towns than in the cities and manufacturing 
towns. 

3rd. Town School Tax, — The amount from this source in- 
creases with the increase of taxable property, and in some cases 
by a voluntary increase in the rate of tax. The amount last 
year was $87,700. 

4th. District Tax. — This is voted by each district separately, 
and independently, and is constantly varying, though generally 
increasing. The amount received from this source was larger 
last year than ever before, and, for the first time in fifty years, 
was larger than the whole income from the school fund, or 
$140,414. 

5th. Tuition. — The amount received from this source the 
last year was $31,422. More difficulty is experienced in col- 
lecting this amount in school bills than in collecting the $227,- 
000 assessed as taxes by districts and towns. The cities and 
larger districts are gradually making their schools free, and 
many of the friends of education believe the time has come 
when the common schools of the State should all be free. 

6th. Local Funds. — The amount from this source was 
$13,786 for the last year, and varies but little from year to year. 



teachers' institutes. 



In compliance with the requirements of the law, Teachers' 
Institutes have been held the past year in each of the counties 
of the State. 

The Institute for Fairfield County was opened at Brookfield, 
April 11th, and continued two days in this place, when it was 
transferred to Newtown, where it continued till Friday even- 
ing, the loth. The attendance was not large at either place, 
but included most of the active teachers in the vicinity of the 
meetings. The design of the Institutes held in the spring is 
especially to meet the wants of the female teachers who are 
employed in the summer schools. It is believed that this Insti- 
tute fully accomplished its purpose in this respect. 

The first of the series of Autumn Institutes was held at 
Somers, commencing September 13th. This place is situated 
at some distance from railroad communication, but the teach- 
ers from the surrounding towns attended with a good degree 
of punctuality and regularity, and manifested a commendable 
interest in the exercises of the Institute. 

The Institute for Hartford County was held in Manchester, 
commencing September 20th. From some mistake in the no- 
tice given, or from some other cause, the attendance at this 
Institute was much smaller than was expected, though a num- 
ber of active, earnest teachers assembled, who engaged cordi- 
ally in the work of the Institute. 

The Institute for Middlesex County was held at Higganum, 
commencing October 11th. The place of meeting was not 
convenient of access by public conveyance, but the attendance 
was larger than was expected, and embraced most of the teach- 
ers in that section of the county. 

The Litchfield County Institute was held at Woodbury, com- 
mencing October 17th. Special efforts had been made by the 
local committee in arranging for this Institute, and though at 
quite a distance from railroad routes, it was well attended by 
enthusiastic, intelligent teachers who by their ready responses 
contributed, in a great degree, to the interest and success of 



10 

the Institute. The Litchfield County Association of School 
Visitors, the most vigorous association of the kind in the State, 
met in connection with the Institute for one day, and by the 
discussion of important questions relating to common schools, 
added much to the value of the Institute. 

The Institute for New London County was held at Lebanon, 
commencing October 24th. The place of meeting was not 
convenient of access by means of public routes for travel, but 
accommodated the teachers from the northern part of this 
county, and from the southern part of Tolland County. The 
conduct of the campaign just before an exciting presidential 
election, occupied the attention of some true friends of educa- 
tion, who would otherwise have been present at this Institute. 

The Institute for Windham County was held the same week 
at Putnam. This place was convenient of access, and a large 
number of teachers were in attendance. The presence of 
school visitors and active friends of education from other 
towns contributed much to the interest and value of the In- 
stitute. 

The Institute for New Haven County was held at Milford, 
commencing November 28th. On account of local circum- 
stances, the time of this meeting was later than that to which 
the Institutes have generally extended, and after most of the 
winter schools had commenced. On this account the attend- 
ance was less than usual. There were, however, several active 
teachers from a distance, and a general attendance from the 
vicinity. The Institute was varied in its exercises, and profit- 
able to those in attendance. 

The Institutes the past year, with two exceptions, have 
mostly been held in agricultural towns, in which were no 
large graded schools. As a consequence, the aggregate num- 
ber of teachers within any prescribed radius was very much 
less than would have been the case had the Institutes been held 
in the cities or larger manufacturing villages. Still it is be- 
lieved that the great object of the Teachers' Institutes has been 
as fully met as it would have been had the meetings been held 
in larger places more convenient of access. 

The country owns must, to a considerable extent, furnish a 



11 

supply of teachers for the schools of those towns. Many of 
these teachers have never attended a Normal School, or any 
higher institution than the district schoql, unless it were a term 
or two in some local select school. The exercises of the Insti- 
tutes are invaluable to such teachers ; and the schools which 
they teach, in many instances, exhibit a marked change from 
the influence of the Institute. 

The amount appropriated for the expenses of Institutes in 
this State will not allow the employ of the varied talent, or 
the adequate payment for. the services of instructors which the 
appropriations of other states permit. It is believed, however, 
that the Institutes have not lacked in variety or in the adapta- 
tion of the instruction to the wants of teachers. The following 
gentlemen have been employed to teach or lecture in the daily 
sessions of the past year : — 

Kev. B. G. Northrop, of Mass. ; Dr. Lowell Mason, Prof. 
N. A. Caulkins and Prof, I. F. Stoddard, of New York ; C. 
Northend, Esq., Prof. H. B. Buckham, Prof. J. N. Bartlett, 
and Prof. E. Kipley, of New Britain ; Kev. H. Beebe, of New 
Haven ; and Kev. Lucian Burleigh, of Plainfield. 

In addition to lectures given by these gentlemen and the 
Superintendent, lectures and addresses were given by Eev. L. 
Perrin, of New Britain ; A. N. Lewis, Esq., of Waterbury ; 
Kev. L. W. Bacon, of Woodbury ; Hon. F. Gillette, of Hart- 
ford ; and J. N. Allen, Esq., of Norwich. Mr. S. Hotchkiss, 
of Fair Haven, rendered some assistance at three of the Insti- 
tutes. 

Clergymen, school visitors, and other friends have contribu- 
ted to the interests of these meetings by participating in the 
discussions and giving short addresses. I have been indebted 
to these gentlemen for special cooperation in preparing for, 
and in conducting the exercises of the Institutes. 

To them and to the various local committees by whose 
efforts ample arrangements were made for the meetings of 
the Institutes, and for the gratuitous accommodation of the 
members in attendance, and to the people who have so gener- 
ously extended their hospitalities to the teachers, I would here 
express my thanks. 



12 



TEACHERS. 



There is still a want of well qualified, skillful teachers in 
common schools. Too many of the persons employed to teach 
enter upon the work as a temporary occupation, to which they 
"bring little of the culture and enthusiasm indispensable to emi- 
nent success. There is an abundance of candidates for the 
teacher's office, but competent teachers could not be found in 
the autumn for all the schools needing and desiring to obtain 
such teachers. This was especially true of young men quali- 
fied to organize and conduct successfully graded schools. In 
many instances, young women have been employed in such 
schools, and in others formerly taught by young men. Where 
female teachers, of mature mind, well educated and expe- 
rienced, have been obtained, the schools have been successful 
some were never better taught and controlled, and the cause 
of education has not suffered loss by employing this class in 
winter schools. But in some cases the persons employed were 
girls taken from the older classes of the district school, who 
had had no opportunity of education beyond such a school, and 
who had never, perhaps, been in a well classified school. 
Without any special training or fitness, they could bring to 
the work few of the requisite qualifications. Some such have 
put forth much effort, have been conscientious, and have 
awakened sympathy, and by the help of school visitors and 
others have saved themselves and the schools from utter dis- 
appointment ; but others have failed, become discouraged, and 
left the school in disgust, or remained without any benefit to 
themselves or the school. The schools, under the direction of 
such teachers, have not been as well managed as when under 
the care of young men in the winter, who, though wanting in 
many of the qualifications possessed by every competent 
teacher, had, from contact with the world, acquired a degree 
of shrewdness and a power of control which have been of im- 
portant service in the school-room. One of the most serious 
evils now to be apprehended is the employment of unqualified 
and inefficient teachers in ordinary district schools. The 



13 

amount of money received from the State by the small coun- 
try towns is annually diminishing, and in some districts there 
is a disposition to diminish the expenses of the school, while 
the expenses of the teacher and all other ordinary expenses are 
increased. 

This leads to the employment of cheap teachers. There are 
many young women annually leaving the district school who 
seek employment, and as "school keeping 5 ' is supposed to be 
easy and respectable, friends and relatives are applied to for 
aid in finding a school ; and a questionable kindness will often 
secure a situation, though at the expense of the rejection of an 
experienced and well qualified teacher. 

We believe that a large proportion of the work of teaching 
may be safely trusted to woman. She has natural qualifica- 
tions which especially fit her for a work requiring so much of 
patience, kindness, and tact ; but if she is to take her place as 
an instructor of youth in schools composed of both sexes, many 
of whom have been ungoverned at home, she must be specially 
qualified for the work. To good native talent there should be 
added maturity of thought aud judgment, a thorough acquaint- 
ance with the studies taught, and such knowledge of the laws 
of mental action and development, as will enable the teacher 
to organize the school wisely, to maintain proper order, and so 
to instruct and train each child that the result may be tho- 
rough, harmonious education. 

There are now to be found, in our public and private schools, 
superior teachers whose literary acquirements, general culture, 
and professional skill fit them well for their positions. Many 
of these are ladies with true refinement and liberal education, 
who bring to their work self-denial, zeal, and devotion unsur- 
passed in any calling. Let these teachers be multiplied and 
their influence extended, till the demand is more nearly sup- 
plied, and one of the most important means of good schools 
would be secured. 

Simple justice as well as a due regard for the best interests 
of common schools requires that teachers should be more ade- 
quately remunerated for their services. This is particularly 
true in regard to female teachers. The salaries of many of 



14 

this class are insufficient to enable them to meet their necessary 
personal expenses, and notwithstanding the most rigid economy 
much self-denial is practiced. The average wages of female 
teachers, including board, is but $1S.05 per month, hardly 
sufficient to pay for the expenses of board in cities and villages. 
Several districts have increased the salaries of teachers the 
past year. It is believed that a corresponding increase in the 
efficiency of the schools may soon be witnessed. 

There were employed in the common schools of the State, , 
the past year, in winter, 757 male teachers, and 1,33S female 
teachers — total, 2,095 ; in summer, 135 male teachers, and 1,892 
female teachers — total, 2,027. The decrease of male teachers 
in the winter schools was 61, and the increase of female teach- 
ers in the same schools was 102 over the number of the pre- 
ceding year. Twenty years | ago there were 1,300 male 
teachers, and but 408 female teachers employed in the winter 
schools. Then the number of male teachers was to the num- 
ber of female teachers as 13 to 4, now it is as 2J to 4. Such 
a change cannot be made without greatly affecting our schools, 
and the influence generally has been to improve them. The 
number of teachers who have taught two or more successive 
terms in the same school is 949, an increase over last year 
of 12. 

The number of teachers who bad never taught before is 540. 
In the introduction of so many inexperienced teachers there is 
danger that many schools will suffer unless great care is taken 
in the education and special training of those who are to en- 
gage in the important work. 

STATE XORMAL SCHOOL. 

Nearly fifteen years have elapsed since the Xormal School 
was opened. These have been peculiarly years of experiment 
and trial to an institution engaged in an enterprise which was 
comparatively new in this country, which had no uniform and 
well defined rules of procedure, and which, from the first, 
has met with more or less of opposition and embarrassment. 
Notwithstanding various hindrances and discouragements the 



15 

school has been kept in continued operation, steadily perform- 
ing the wcrk for which it was incorporated, and annually send- 
ing forth to the schools of the State a band of teachers who 
have entered with zeal and general success upon the responsi- 
ble work for which they had been making special preparation. 

When the Connecticut Normal School was organized in 
1850, but two states in the Union had similar institutions, 
Massachusetts and New York. Massachusetts has now four 
State Normal Schools, New York two, and there are besides, 
city Normal Schools in both states. Michigan opened a State 
Normal School in 1852, Rhode Island in 1854, New Jersey in 
1855, Illinois in 185T, Pennsylvania, one in 1858, another in 
i860, and a third in 1863. Minnesota organized a Normrl 
School in 1858, which was afterwards suspended for a short 
time, but was reorganized with additional appropriations in 
1864. Iowa established a Normal department in her State 
university in I860. California organized her Normal School in 
1863, Maine in 1864, and Kansas in 1864. The British Prov- 
inces have several Normal Schools, most of which have been 
established since the Connecticut Normal School was opened. 

The Secretaries of Boards of Education, and State Superin- 
tendents have uniformly borne testimony to the value of Nor- 
mal Schools, and to their beneficial influence upon the schools 
in the states where they have been established. 

In states which have as yet organized no Normal Schools the 
Superintendents unanimously advocate the organization of 
such institutions. School visitors, other school .officers, and 
teachers in this State, have b orne abundant testimony to the 
beneficial influence of our own Normal School, and have re- 
peatedly urged more adequate provision for its support. 

During the fifteen years of its existence it has received 2,218 
students, the greater part of whom have left the institution to 
teach in the common schools of the State. The demand for 
teachers from the Normal School is far beyond the number of 
its graduates, and large numbers from the under-graduating 
classes leave to teach in common schools. Many of these 
eventually return and take the diploma. 

The Normal School is under the constant supervision and 



16 

control of trustees appointed by the General Assembly, who 
visit it by some of their number every term, and who devote 
much time to the interests of the school and to labors for its 
welfare. 

A more detailed account of the condition and wants of the 
school will be found in the report of the Trustees. 

•€TATE REFORM SCHOOL. 

The State Reform School has been successful in its operations 
and has continued to provide instruction and healthful employ- 
ment for those committed to its charge. While it must ever 
be a matter of regret that so many boys in the manufacturing 
villages and cities are permitted to grow up without instruction 
or restraint, it is encouraging to know that for those sent to 
the Reform School the means of education are not only provided 
by the State, but instrumentalities are used which bring the 
means to each inmate, and he here enjoys the privileges of 
regular and systematic training and instruction, while at the 
same time he is taught to work for his own support. 

SCHOOL FOR IMBECILES. 

This institution has been enlarged the past year, and is now 
occupying the new building provided for its especial accommo- 
dation. It has thus increased facilities for usefulness. 

The indefatigable exertions of its Superintendent, and the 
kind care and attention of his assistants, have already accom- 
plished much for the unfortunate class for which this school is 
designed. While the Reform School deals chiefly with chil- 
dren of good natural talents but neglected education, this 
school is designed to develope feeble intellectual faculties, 
and bring the unfortunate to a better knowledge of their 
own powers and their relation to the world and to God. It is 
eminently deserving of the sympathy and interest of the humane. 

SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL — YALE COLLEGE. 

By an Act of the General Assembly of IS 63, the amount 
received from the sale of public lands donated to this State by 



17 

the National Congress, for the purpose ot promoting education 
in the sciences essential to agriculture and the mechanic arts, 
was appropriated to the Sheffield Scientific School, and thus 
this institution has a specific relation to public education in the 
State. This school is designed to furnish a thorough course of 
study in Chemistry and Natural Science, in Agriculture, and 
in Engineering and Mechanics. Besides these special courses 
there is a general course, thorough and complete, but " intended 
to be scientific rather than literary, preparatory to higher 
special studies." 

The act of appropriation from the State provides for the 
gratuitous instruction of a certain number of candidates nomi- 
nated by the Appointing Board, which is constituted by the 
Legislature. It is to be hoped that the unusual advantages for 
a scientific education which are furnished by this school will 
be enjoyed by man} 7 worthy young men prepared for admission 
in our public high schools. 

A more particular account of its course of study and terms 
of admission will be found in the Appendix, C. 

SCHOOL LIBRARIES. 

The whole number of applications for library money the 
past year was sixty-three. Fifteen orders have been drawn in 
favor of as many districts for the first installment of ten dol- 
lars, and forty-eight orders for subsequent installments of five 
dollars each. The whole number of orders which have been 
drawn since the passage of the library law is six hundred and 
forty-seven of the first class, and six hundred and seventy-five 
of subsequent classes. 

By the operation of this law a large number of schools have 
been provided with dictionaries and other reference books, oth- 
ers have been provided with circulating libraries, or with maps 
and school apparatus. 

The books have usually been well kept, and have been used 
with benefit to the schools in which they have been placed. 
A careful examination of the books of record of library appli- 
cations, and of orders drawn, shows that it^s from those parts 



18 

of the State and from those districts in which there has been 
manifested the greatest interest in the improvements of common 
schools that applications for library money have come. 

Library certificates have been issued between March Z\st, 1SG4, 
and March 31^, 1S65, as follows: 

First Installment — $10 each. 

Bethany, Beacon Falls. 

Danbury, Boggs. 

Hamden, No. 7. 

Huntington, Upper White Hills — Ferry. 

New Hartford, North East. 

Newtown, Tannton. 

New London, No. 7. 

Nortu Haven, No. 8. 

Norwalk, No. 10. 

Norwich, No. 3. 

^aybrook, No. 1. 

West Hartford, South. 

Westport, East Sangatuck. 

Wethersfield, No. 1. 

Second Installment — $5 each. 

Danbury, King St., Great Plain. 

Farmington, North. 

Milford, No. 5. 

Morris, No. 1. 

New Milford, No. 10. 

New London, No. 7. 

Norwalk, Center. 

Sprague, No. 3. 

Torrington, Torringford, North, South, and Center, 

Trumbull, Nichols' Farms. 

Watertown, Center. 

Wethersfield, No. 3. 



19 



Third Installment — $5 each. 



Danbury, Middle Center. 
Hamden, No. 10. 
Stamford, No. 1. 
Wallingford, No. 2. 

Fourth Installment — $5 each. 

East Windsor, No. 10. 
Griswold, No. 3. 
Hartford, West Middle. 
Litchfield, Beach St. 
Coventry, No. 9. 

Fifth Installment — $5 each. 

Fairfield, Southport. 

Madison, No. 3. 

Morris, No. 3. 

New Britain, No. 4. 

New Hartford, Town Hill, North End. 

New London, No. 1. 

North Haven, No. 2. 

Southington, No. 4. 

Vernon, Rockville, East. 

Waterbury, Center. 



Sixth Installment — $5 each. 



East Haven, South. 
Greenwich, Peck's Lane. 
Madison, East River. 
New MiniORD, No. 9. 



Seventh Installment — $5 each. 



New Britain, Center. 
New London, No. 2. 



20 



Eighth Installment — $5 each. 

Bridgeport, Bridgeport. 

Hartland, West Center. 

Madison, No. 4. 

New Britain, Center. 

New Milford, No. 1. 

Suffield, West Center, South East. 

Plymouth, No. 5. 

Ninth Installment — $5. 
Bridgeport, Bridgeport. 

CONNECTICUT COMMON SCHOOL JOURNAL. 

Notwithstanding the greatly increased expense of publishing 
educational periodicals, the Common School Journal has been 
continued another year. This journal is the official organ of 
the department of education, and contains the amendments 
and alterations to laws relating to common schools. It is the 
medium of general communication with school officers, and 
furnishes much valuable information relating to schools, meth- 
ods of teaching, &c. 

It is sent to the acting school visitor of each town, and is 
taken by a large proportion of the prominent teachers of the 
State, and by many district officers. 

As a vehicle for disseminating facts concerning common 
schools, noting changes and improvements, and suggesting 
measures for remedying some of the evils existing, this journal 
has done good service in the cause of education. 

SCHOOL SYSTEM. 

The school system of Connecticut is the growth of more 
than two centuries. The germ was planted when the early 
colonists, in 1040, decreed that " a free school should beset up 
and that the pastor, together with the magistrates, should con- 



21 

sider wbat yearly allowance is meet to be given to it out of 
the cqpimon stock of the town, and also what rules and regu- 
lations should be observed in and about the same." 

This order of the General Court at New Haven, recognized 
the obligation of the State to provide for the education of its 
children and youth ; and at the same time, made the common 
school a State institution, subject to the laws and direction of 
the State, and rightfully supported by the property of the 
State. These two principles, the obligation of the State to 
establish and support public schools, and the rightful authority 
to make rules and regulations for the same, have been recog- 
nized in legislation from that time to the present. 

Provision was also made by the early colonists for higher 
education by establishing grammar schools, in which the higher 
English branches and the Latin were taught. It was evidently 
the early policy of the State to have its children and youth 
thoroughly educated, and to have provision made for this 
education in common schools. 

Schools were at first organized and supported by towns, and 
were under the management of town officers. In 1700, every 
town of thirty families was required to maintain a school at 
least six months in the year, and those having over seventy 
families, the whole year. 

A tax of forty shillings on every thousand pounds of the 
lists of the estates, was collected with the annual State tax, 
and paid only to those towns which should keep a school 
according to law. 

During the early history of the State, its schools were good 
schools, their reputation extended to other States, and their 
influence was felt generally upon the communities, of this. 
For some reason, there seems to have been a lack of confidence 
in common schools for higher instruction, from the beginning 
of the present century. Private schools and academies were 
established and supported by the wealthy. The interest of this 
class were to a great degree withdrawn from common schools, 
and these schools became too often, institutions for the poorer 
classes only, supported almost exclusively by public funds, and 



22 

deficient in most of the qualities which constitute a good 
school. ^ 

From the time in which the tax for the support of schools was 
abolished, or in 1822, there seems to have been a diminution 
of interest and efficiency, more and more disastrous, till mea- 
sures were taken for the improvement of schools, by returning 
to the practice of taxing property for their support, and pro- 
viding for more thorough examination and visitation, and more 
adequate supervision generally. 

The schools in some parts of the State have improved rapidly 
within the past few years, and in some towns and districts will 
compare favorably with those of any other State, but there 
are improvements still demanded. 

GRADED AND CLASSIFIED SCHOOLS. 

There is need of more thorough classification, and the 
organization of graded schools wherever practicable. Graded 
schools have already been established in all the cities and in 
most of the larger manufacturing villages. Most of these 
schools are well classified, and lessons have been given and 
methods of training have been employed, in accordance with 
well established principles of mental and moral development, 
but this is by no means universal even in graded schools. 
There are instances at the present time in some of these schools, 
where the classification is very imperfect, and methods of 
teaching are practiced, which were long since condemned by 
intelligent educators. In many of the mixed district schools, 
the evil is still greater. A large number of children differing 
widely in, age, capacity and attainment, are crowded into the 
same room, to be instructed by one teacher. Lessons are given 
entirely unsuited to the capacity of a portion of the pupils, 
and studies are assigned according to the whim of the parent 
or child, without any special reference either to previous 
attainments or succeeding lessons. 

A portion of the pupils of such a school may learn a certain 
number of words from a book ; the memory may be stored 
with isolated facts, but the mental faculties are not harmoni- 



23 

ously and healthfully developed. The individual after years 
of school life has no scholarly habits ; he has not been properly 
educated by anything the school has done for him, and he 
leaves the district school without being well fitted for advanced 
study, to enter upon business to serve the state, or to perform 
the duties and enjoy the privileges of social life well, or if 
fitted for either of these objects, it is not by the aid which the 
school has given. In the agricultural portions of the State, 
where not more than fifty children of school age can be col- 
lected at any given point, a single school must necessarily 
provide for the education of those who in a city would be 
assigned to the primary, secondary and grammar schools. In 
such a school, it may not be practicable at once to make a 
rigid classification in all the studies, but one or two leading 
branches may be adopted, as reading and arithmetic, and pupils 
of similar attainments in these branches, be put together in 
the same classes. A course of study should then be marked 
out, which should be thoroughly but continuously pursued, 
term after term, with reference to a specific end. 

The number of pupils placed under a single teacher, should 
never exceed fifty, and in mixed district schools it would be 
better to limit the number to forty. There should be as few 
classes as is consistent with the varied qualifications of the 
pupils. The teacher will then have more time to devote to 
the recitations and exercises of each class. The questions can 
be more exhaustive, the instruction more full and thorough, 
and the mind be more harmoniously developed. Children 
enter these schools, on an average, under five years of age. 
The instruction for the younger pupils should be principally 
oral, and have especial reference to the cultivation of the per- 
ceptive faculties, and securing the habits of attention and 
careful observation. Books may then be placed in their hands, 
with short easy lessons to be committed to memory, the lessons 
to be increased in length, and to be more diffcult as the facul- 
ties are developed and strengthened by exercise. 

The majority of the children in agricultural districts, remain 
in the common school till after they are twelve years of age, 
and some two or three years longer. Every pupil attending 



24 

these district or mixed schools for six years, should be a good 
reader, a correct speller, should be quick and accurate in 
figures, and be able to perform problems under all the elemen- 
tary rules of arithmetic, and give reasons for the several steps 
in the operation ; should be able to apply the rules to the 
practical questions and operations required in business life ; 
should be thoroughly acquainted with the geography and his- 
tory of his own country, and with the outlines of the geogra- 
phy of the world ; should be able to use the English language 
properly in speaking and writing, and should be acquainted 
with the elements of physical science. More than this is 
secured in some district schools now, and pupils of twelve 
years of age have made considerable progress in general his- 
tory, algebra, Latin, &c. But we believe the great object of 
common or public schools, will be best accomplished by con- 
fining the work of these schools, usually, to strictly elementary 
studies, and to exercises designed to develop the intellectual 
and moral powers harmoniously. Education, even of common 
schools, should not stop here. The demands of business, of 
social life, of the State, and of the age, require that education 
should be continued beyond this point. An attempt has been 
made to meet this demand, by introducing additional and 
higher studies into the district schools. Thus algebra, Latin, 
philosophy and general history, have already a place in many 
schools, in which are children who have never learned to read, 
and classes of two or three pupils may be found occupying a 
considerable portion of the time of the teacher, while the 
younger pupils are neglected for want of proper attention. As 
a consequence, the whole work of the school is imperfect ; the 
foundation is not well laid, and the superstructure is neither 
solid nor symmetrical. 

There may be instances, where in small schools far removed 
from high schools and academies, it may be best to permit the 
introduction of philosophy, Latin, or some other of the higher 
studies, into mixed district schools, to accommodate those 
pupils who cannot pursue these studies elsewhere, but in these 
cases, the commencement of a particular study may be alloted 
to a particular term, and such study, or some definite division 



25 

of it, be confined to that term, and the teacher not be required 
to repeat the same work each term of the year, on different 
classes of two or three pupils. In some of these district 
schools, teachers, with a commendable spirit of self-denial and 
devotion to what they considered the interests of the school, 
have heard these classes out of school hours. 

There are already more than two hundred graded schools in 
the State. The tendency of the population to concentrate in 
manufacturing villages, and near the cities, gives additional 
facilities for the organization of these schools. In some 
instances, the union of two or more districts may be necessary 
to secure the full advantages of graded schools, in others, the 
object will be most economically secured, by abolishing all the 
districts of a town, or consolidating them into a single district. 
The success of graded schools in this State and others, has 
r established, beyond question, the fact of their adaptation to the 
necessities of our larger communities, and has clearly shown 
that great benefits will be secured by them. 

TOWN HIGH SCHOOLS. 

To remedy the defects in district schools, and to meet the 
very proper demand for higher education, it is believed that 
there is no better plan than the establishment of town high 
schools. 

There are in the State twenty-one cities and towns, with 
more than one thousand children of school age in each. In 
each of these places where there is not already a good endowed 
academy, a public high school, or similar institution for day 
scholars, there should be established a first class high school, 
with all the necessary facilities for instructing youth in the 
higher English studies and in the ancient and modern lan- 
guages, so that an opportunity would be afforded for a young 
man to fit for college, or to take a thorough English course. 

There are fifty towns with less than a thousand, but more 
than five hundred children of school age in each. These 
towns might support a good high school for at least ten months 
of the year, in which the higher English studies and the rudi- 



20 

ments of Latin might be taught In some instances, the high 
school in these towns would provide for a full preparatory 
course for college, and afford an opportunity for parents and 

guardians, resident in places where high schools were not 
established, to send their children and wards to a good high 
school, by paying the usual tuition. 

There are about seventy-five towns in the State, with less 
than five hundred children of school age, but with more than 
two hundred. In these towns, there should be some school or 
department in which algebra, natural philosophy, history, 
physiology, and perhaps some other higher English studies, 
might be pursued, and in some cases, the rudiments, at least, of 
Latin. 

In the remaining towns, or those with less than two hundred 
children of school age, a high school might be opened for five 
or six months of the year, or if the schools continue to be 
managed by districts, some one of the district schools might 
be graded, and in the higher departments, children from all 
the districts in town be admitted when properly qualified. 

In two cities, public high schools have been established and 
supported by the towns in which these cities are situated. In 
three cities, high schools are established and supported by 
districts whose limits correspond with the city limits; in 
one city, an endowed high school, or free academy, affords the 
privileges of a high school to all resident in the town, and in 
the remaining city, the highest department of the graded 
school in the most populous district, affords an opportunity to 
all persons resident in the district to pursue the usual studies 
of a high school to a certain extent. 

A few manufacturing villages and towns have established 
public high schools, which are liberally supported, and in some 
others, there are permanent academies or endowed institutions, 
which may afford all the facilities required to enable the youth 
of these places to pursue their studies beyond the course of 
the ordinary district school. 

The high schools already established, are very different in 
character. In some, young men are fitted for college as well 
as in the best preparatory schools ; others afford special facili- 



27 

ties for pursuing the modern languages, and music and draw- 
ing; while others still, provide more paiticularly for a higher 
English course, for business life. In connection with these 
schools, I have spoken of particular studies, not because these 
alone determine the character of the school, but because they 
serve as a convenient standard to measure the grade, and 
determine the work of these institutions. 

There are honest differences of opinion as to the extent to 
which education should be carried in public or common schools, 
but there is certainly a tendency to enlarge the course of study. 
There are more than seventy-five towns in this State in which 
algebra is taught in common schools; in nearly forty towns, 
natural philosophy and book-keeping are found in these 
schools ; in nearly as many, Latin ; in twenty, geometry ; and 
in about the same number, physiology and astronomy ; while 
botany, rhetoric, Greek and French, are reported in the com- 
mon schools of a number of towns. 

The introduction of these studies indicates that a want is 
felt for them, and is also evidence that school visitors have 
deemed them desirable in a common school education. The 
demands of society, of business and social life, require that 
more comprehensive education should be provided in common 
schools, than was considered sufficient fifty years ago. 

In Massachusetts, the law requires every town of five hun- 
dred families, (or with a population of about twenty-five hun- 
dred,) "to maintain a school kept by a master, who shall give 
instruction in general history, book-keeping, surveying, geom- 
etry, natural philosophy, chemistry, botany, the civil polity of 
the Commonwealth and of the United States, and the Latin 
language." And " in every town containing four thousand 
inhabitants, in addition to these branches, the master shall be 
competent to give instruction in the Greek and French 
languages, astronomy, geology, rhetoric, logic, intellectual and 
moral science, and political economy." The same principle 
applied to this State, would require fifty-five towns to maintain 
high schools, seventeen of which would be of the highest 
class. There are in Massachusetts more than one hundred 
towns which support high schools in which the Greek and 



28 

Latin languages are taught. In speaking of these schools, 
the Secretary of the Board of Education, Hon. Joseph White, 
in his annual report, says: "After an experience of two and 
a quarter centuries, the importance of this class of schools 
needs not to be argued. It is gratifying to read in the annual 
reports of those towns where they are maintained, the 
uniformly high testimony in favor of their beneticent influence 
upon all the important interests of the town. The fact that 
they furnish to the young of the poorest class, the opportunity 
of fitting themselves for higher courses of classical and pro- 
fessional education, as well as for a successful prosecution of 
any honorable pursuit on which they may choose to enter, and 
thus powerfully aid in removing all distinction between the 
children of the rich and the poor, and in often developing 
talents of the highest order, which otherwise would never have 
been cultivated, must, of itself, commend these schools to the 
highest place in the public estimation." 

The organization of similar institutions in our own State, 
would not only provide for a large number of children and 
youth of wealthy families, who are now sent out of the State 
to obtain an education, but it would develop the talent of 
many of the poorer classes who cannot be sent abroad to 
boarding schools and academies, or receive the advantages of 
our best private schools, on account of the expense. 

Town high schools would also exert a healthful influence 
over lower grades, and particularly over mixed district schools. 

1st. By having a well-defined standard of attainment, which 
should be requisite for admission to the high school, they* 
would present to the pupils of lower departments and of mixed 
schools, a distinct goal to be reached, a position to be gained 
by constant attendance and faithful study in the elementary 
schools. This stimulus in the hands of judicious teachers, 
would exert an influence through whole schools and depart- 
ments, affecting every class which needed such stimulus, and 
tend to secure definiteness and harmony in all the studies and 
exercises of the school, so that those who should never enter 
the high school, would be better educated for its successful 
operation. 



29 

2d. By removing the most advanced pupils from the district 
schools, the number of classes would be lessened, and the 
teachers of these schools would have more time to devote to 
elementary studies. Much complaint has been made, and 
with some reason, that spelling and reading are neglected, and 
the teachers are occupied with classes, or individual pupils in 
algebra, philosophy, or Latin, when they should be teaching 
the elementary studies more thoroughly. The elementary 
branches are not always well taught, and as a consequence, 
the inaccurate, hesitating manner of reading and spelling, too 
often becomes characteristic of all literary acquirements, and 
no branch or science is thoroughly mastered. 

If in the larger towns and villages, high schools can be 
organized and sustained, which will provide for the instruction 
of the advanced classes, and the special studies of these classes 
be taught only in these schools, then the mixed district schools 
could be confined chiefly to the legitimate work of strictly 
elementary training, and there would be hope that this work 
would be better performed, and that the foundation of a good 
common education would be more securely laid. 

High schools would also have an important influence in 
cultivating a taste for literary pleasures, and a desire for other 
privileges, such as the lyceum and public library. They 
would aflbrd an opportunity for higher education to be con- 
tinued, while the child remained at home in the bosom of the 
family, under home influences, and with such associations as 
judicious parents can best select. 

Objections are raised to the establishment of public high 
schools, a few of which may be noticed. 

1st. It is said that the addition of high schools to our present 
6ystem, will make education more expensive. In some cases 
this will be true, but not in all. In many towns, a greater 
amount is annually paid for the education of a half a dozen 
pupils abroad, than would be required to support a good high 
school at home. More than a quarter of a million of dollars 
is annually expended for the tuition of less than ten thousand 
pupils of this State in private schools. If town high schools 
were organized, more than one half of this amount could be 



30 

saved, and better facilities for education be afforded than now. 
With high schools in successful operation, nearly all the other 
grades and schools, with the exception of grammar schools in 
cities, would be taught the whole year by female teachers, 
whose services are obtained at a less price than is paid to com- 
petent male teachers for the winter months. But if the aggre- 
gate expense was increased, as it would be in some towns, would 
not the additional benefits secured more than compensate for 
the additional outlay ? 

2nd. Another objection is, that the property of persons not 
sending to school would be taxed for the education of " other 
children." Both State and national governments have recog- 
nized the right to tax property for the public good ; and Con- 
necticut has, in numerous instances, established the rule, that 
common schools were State institutions, organized and sup- 
ported not merely for the benefit of those attending, but for 
the public good. It is believed, too, that property would be 
increased in value, by the existence of good high schools, 
more than would be paid for the expense of those schools. 

3rd. An objection sometimes heard is, that if high schools, 
or good schouls of any kind, are open to the poor, this class 
will be educated above their station, and be dissatisfied with 
it. This will never be the influence of right education. It 
better fits the individual for any position to which he may be 
called. It makes a more intelligent mechanic or worker in the 
soil, and a better member of society. But who can fix the 
position of any man in this country? How often have men 
from the laboring classes, or from active business life, been 
raised to positions of honor and trust in the state and nation. 

4th. Another objection raised against public high schools is, 
that they will interfere with academies and private schools. 
This will depend upon the character of the latter institutions. 
Where well endowed academies or permanent private schools 
are established, which afford the opportunities for higher edu- 
cation to all qualified to enjoy such opportunities, and these 
institutions are opened on such terms that all classes, the poor 
as well as the rich, can enter them and participate in the ben- 
efits which they bestow, there may be no need of public high 



31 

schools. Tims the Free Academy at Norwich, and the Bacon 
Academy at Colchester, are opened to all in each town quali- 
fied for admission ; and they provide facilities for higher Eng- 
lish and classical education to all who attend them. There are, 
probably, a few other towns similarly provided. If there are 
good private schools or academies not endowed, and which are 
supported by a high rate of tuition, the town might, in some 
way, adopt these institutions, and become responsible for their 
support. 

In the early part of this century, or forty years ago, there 
were a large number of flourishing academies in the State, 
but the number now is small. Of nearly fifty academies and 
seminaries incorporated by the General Assembly, from 1793 
to 1860, less than a dozen continue a permanent school. A 
few others have a periodical or spasmodic existence ; but they 
do not provide for a permanent system of higher instruction 
for the youth who leave the ordinary district school. If to the 
academies and seminaries we add private schools of all kinds, 
including boarding-schools, we find about three hundred and 
fifty institutions which are not supported, in part or wholly, 
by public funds. In these schools there are nine thousand two 
hundred pupils ; but a large number of these, particularly in 
boarding-schools, are from other' States. There are not as 
many persons in private schools now as there were twenty 
years ago ; and yet, in that time, the number of children of 
school age has increased twenty-eight thousand, or thirty-three 
per cent. 

This history of private schools and academies is not peculiar 
to this State. In Massachusetts there were, in 1840, eighty 
incorporated academies, and one thousand three hundred and 
eighty-eight unincorporated and private schools. In 1860, 
there were but sixty-three incorporated academies, and six 
hundred and thirty-eight private schools, or a decrease of 
twenty per cent, of the former, and fifty-four per cent, of the 
latter, in twenty years ; and yet, in that time, the increase of 
population in that State was more than half a million, exceed- 
ing the whole population of Connecticut now. In some other 



32 

states the decrease in academies and private schools has been 
still greater. 

Some of the private schools of our own State are merito- 
rious institutions, deserving the support which they receive, 
and they are accomplishing much in educating the pupils 
attending them ; but many private schools are transient or 
changeable in character. They cannot be relied on to furnish 
educational advantages to the children of the State, and the 
rate of tuition in some of them entirely precludes the attend- 
ance of the worthy poor. 

The State must then look to her public schools chiefly to 
furnish the means of education which most of her children can 
enjoy. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

With proper grades and schools established there should be 
courses of study, of physical, intellectual, and moral training 
adapted to each class and school, so well defined and so dis- 
tinctly described, that each school committee or parent could 
understand the same, and be able to see clearly what was the 
employment of each class and pupil for each day of the term. 
Different branches of study should succeed each other in 
proper order, and be accompanied with such physical exer- 
cises and means of training as will best unfold all the facul- 
ties harmoniousl} T , and secure the highest intellectual power, 
the most healthful physical constitution, and the best moral 
training. 

A course of study, or method of culture, is not something 
which can be trusted to accident, or which can be safely 
adopted without forethought. Either, to be successful, must 
be based upon the well established principles of mental phi- 
losophy, and accord with the science of education in its theo- 
retical rules and practical developments. 

We well know the importance of s} 7 stem in every human 
undertaking. The excellence secured in some departments of 
industry is owing mainly to the system employed. In the 
manufacture of material fabrics, repeated experiments in the 



33 

application of the laws of physics have determined certain 
processes — certain arrangements of parts — certain relations of 
causes and sequences — which are recognized by every intelli- 
gent superintendent or agent. Each workman has a special 
and definite part assigned him, to be done at its proper time. 
So in education, there are laws of intellectual and moral 
growth which must be recognized in all successful culture. 

More than five hundred persons, each year, begin their ex- 
perience in teaching in the common schools of the State, 
Yery few of these persons have had the advantages of tho- 
rough, systematic training in a college or seminary. A con- 
siderable number have enjoyed, for a time, the benefits of the 
Normal School ; a few others are the graduates of some high 
6chool or academy ; but the greater part have had no special 
preparation, nor any school advantages, except such as are ob- 
tained in common schools. Suppose that these teachers are all 
actuated by the purest motives, that they engage in their work 
with a sincere purpose of educating the child wisely, and fur- 
ther, that they are above the average of scholarship in the 
schools where they have studied, we have no positive assur- 
ance that they will be successful in directing a school or in 
wisely organizing classes. 

They enter the school-room with no well defined plan of the 
work to be accomplished ; they find forty or fifty children, of 
different ages, diverse habits and attainments, and in their 
hands a variety of books to be used ; but no chart to mark 
out their course, no guide to specify what is to be accom- 
plished each term. Is it strange that, in these circumstances 
many fail, not in maintaining order simply, but in almost, 
everything which is necessary to constitute thorough and sys- 
tematic training and culture, without which the school is of 
very little benefit ? 

• It is not expected that all children can be educated pre- 
cisely alike, that the same results will, in all instances, attend 
the same course of instruction, or that the same time will be 
required, by all of similar age, to accomplish any particular 
portion of the school work. Children are not machines, to be 
treated mechanically ; or to be directed by the laws which 

3 



34 

govern inert matter. There are peculiar dispositions, temper- 
aments, and capabilities, which must not be overlooked even 
in graded schools. There are, however, laws of mental and 
moral development which are applicable in every community, 
and which should be recognized in all schools. The faculties 
of the healthful mind are universally of the same number, 
have the same relation to each other, and are to be unfolded 
by the application of the same general laws. 

It is believed that intelligent school visitors, by a judicious 
exercise of the authority conferred upon them by the law 
which makes it their duty to " prescribe rules and regulations 
for the management, studies, books, classification, and disci- 
pline of the schools," might do much to aid the young teacher, 
and make the instruction more valuable. 

As there has been so recently (Report of 1862) presented an 
outline of a course of study and training for classes in com- 
mon schools, no detailed scheme will be given here. In most 
of the cities and iu some towns carefully prepared plans^of 
examination and classification, with appropriate courses of 
study, have been adopted. (See Appendix, B.) 

A COMPLETE SCHOOL SYSTEM. 

The school system, to be complete, should provide for the 
thorough, comprehensive education of all the children of the 
State. There should be schools furnishing the benefits needed, 
so situated, and opened on such terms, that each child can en- 
joy the blessing of a good common school education. 

It is not expected that good schools of each grade can be 
brought to the home of each child, but everv town, borough, 
and city, should have schools established at such points, and so 
provided with all the necessary facilities that a good element- 
ary education may be obtained by all persons residing within 
their limits. 

Were graded schools organized in all places where a suffi- 
cient number of children can be conveniently brought together, 
and the ungraded country schools thoroughly classified, and a 
good public high school established in every town where practi- 



35 

cable, there would be few children in the State not enjoying 
school privileges, and the school system would be greatly im- 
proved. 

Many of these advantages can be secured under the present 
arrangement of school districts, by the action of towns in es- 
tablishing schools of a higher grade ; but in many places the 
opportunity of providing economically and wisely for all of 
school age, would be much increased were schools entirely 
under the direction of towns. 

In what has been said of the importance of more system in 
our schools, and of opportunities for higher education, it has 
not been the intention to detract at all from the excellencies of 
that school system which has distinguished Connecticut at 
home and given her renown abroad. It has been my privilege 
to visit schools in most of the states, from Maine to Missouri, 
and from Canada to Carolina, and in the course of official 
duties I have visited more than a thousand of the schools of 
Connecticut. 

While there are schools in some of our sister states and in 
Canada which seem as nearly perfect in arrangement, control, 
and instruction, as any human institution can be, it may be 
said with truth, that there are schools or departments in this 
State which will not suffer in comparison with any elsewhere. 
But this is not universal or general. With all the excellencies 
of which we may boast, and the bright examples to which we 
may proudly point, there are defects in organization, in plan, 
and execution. Let the defects and imperfections be fairly 
and frankly exposed, and let there be legislative enactments, 
wherever necessary, which will tend to foster the schools and 
encourage improvements ; and it is hoped that there will be, 
on the part of the people, promptitude and intelligent action to 
remedy the defects, remove the imperfections, and secure all 
the appliances necessary for successful universal education. 
So long as there is in the State a single school perpetuating 
error or marring the human soul, or a single pupil checked in 
his course with half an education, because the school is not to 
be found to complete the work, or a single child in the streets 



36 

untaught, there is something to be done to perfect the system 
and improve the condition of the schools of this common- 
wealth. 

In any civilized community and at any time, there are strong 
reasons for the thorough education of all the children and youth 
of such community. Under the government of a free republic 
the reasons for securing such education, are immeasurably in- 
creased ; and never, in the history of this government, hare 
these reasons pressed with greater force than now. Just emer- 
ging from a civil war, which has no parallel in the history of 
nations, struggling from the throes of a rebellion which has 
tested every power of government, and has cost millions of 
treasure and hundreds of thousands of lives, there never was a 
time when it was more important that the whole people should 
be educated to intelligence, morality, and a love of truth and 
order. The welfare of the nation, every principle of justice, 
of pariotism, and of humanity, demands that the great princi- 
ples of freedom and of democratic government be now firmly 
established. For this purpose the common school becomes an 
institution of the utmost importance to be fostered by the State 
and made in the highest degree effective. 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS, 

Relating to the Common Schools of Connecticut, for the year 
ending August Zlst, 1864. 

Number of towns in the State, . . . 162 

Number of towns which have made no returns, 

Number of school districts in the State, . 1,609 

Number of public or common schools, . . 1,795 
Number of children between the ages of four and 

sixteen years, . . . 114,772 



37 



Increase over previous year, . . . 

Average number in each district between four 

and sixteen years of age, 
Average length, in weeks, of winter schools, 

" " " " summer " 

Number of boys registered in winter, 

« girls " " " 

" boys " " summer, 

u gir l s it U u 

Whole number registered in winter, 

M " " " summer, 

Average attendance of boys in winter, 

" " « girls " " 

a u « boyg u 

" " " girls " 

Total average attendance in winter, 

11 " " <; summer, 

Number of male teachers in winter, 



summer. 



female 



" summer, 
" winter, 
" summer. 



Number of teachers who have taught the same 
school two or more successive terms, 

Average wages, per month, of male teachers, in 
eluding board, 

Average wages, per month, of female taachers 
including board, . . t. 

Number of schools of tv^o grades, 

" " " of three or more grades, 
" " new school houses erected during the 
year, .... 

Capital of School Fund, . 

Revenue of School Fund, distributed February 
28, 1865, . 

Dividend, per scholar, from School Fund, 

Capital of Town Deposit Fund, 

Revenue of Town Deposit Fund for school pur 
poses, .... 



2,674 

71 
17 
16 

40,819 

36,277 

33,466 

35,591 

77,126 

69,057 

29,529 

25,832 

22,592 

25,179 

55,361 

47,771 

757 

135 

1,338 

1,897 

949 

$33.00 

18.00 

117 

86 

26 
$2,050,460.49 

131,997.80 
1.15 

763,661.83 



45,819.00 



38 

Amount raised by town tax for support of schools, $87,704.00- 
Amount of revenue from district or other funds, 13,786.68 
Amount of district tax for support of schools, 140,414.00 
Amount of tuition from resident pupils, . 31,422.00 
Amount expended for new school houses and re- 
pairs, ..... 95,817.00 
Number of school houses reported in good condi- 
tion, ..... 1,335 
Number of school houses reported in bad condi- 
tion, ..... 295 
Number of school houses without out-buildings, 239 
" u " " with enclosed yards, . 251 
" " districts which have outline maps, . 925 
" " " " M school library, . 508 
" M " which assess a tax on property, 181 
" " " " receive tuition from 
resident pupils, .... 305 

For a more detailed account of the statistics of each town, 
see Appendix. 

DAVID N. CAMP, 
Superintendent of Common Schools. 

New Britain, April 10th, 1865. 






CONTENTS. 



Superintendent's Report, - - - - 3 

School Houses, - - -i - - 4 

Attendance, - - - . - 6 

Means for the Support of Schools, 8 

Teachers' Institutes, - - - - 9 

Teachers, - - - - - 12 

State Normal School — Yale College, - - - 14 

Slate Reform School, - - - - 16 

School for Imbeciles, - - - - - 16 

Sheffield Scientific School, - - - 16 

School Libraries, - - - - - - 17 

Connecticut Common School Journal, - . - 20 

School System, - - - - - 20 

Graded and Classified Schools, 22 

Town High Schools, - - - - - 25 

Course of Study, - - - 32 

Complete School System, - - - - - 34 

Summary of Statistics, 36 



APPENDIX 



APPENDIX. 



EXTRACTS FROM REPORTS OF SCHOOL VISITORS. 

The extracts from the reports of school visitors are presented 
under different heads, classified, as far as possible, according to 
the prominent subjects of each report. Some of the reports 
were quite full of details of particular schools, showing the 
success or failure of particular teachers, or pointing out some 
local difficulty or recommending some local transient improve- 
ment. Many of the reports of this character have been of 
great value to the Superintendent in the performance of his 
duties, but were not of a nature for general publication. The 
extracts subjoined exhibit the results of the operation of the 
school system in different parts of the State, and contain valu- 
able suggestions in relation to the improvement of common 
schools. 



Attendance. 

BETHANY. 



While we have had good teachers, and' our schools have been quite as 
prosperous as heretofore, we regret that they suffer seriously from the 
irregular attendance of the pupils. Too frequently this comes from a 
want of parental interest. Parents are unwilling to make sacrifices for 

the proper education of their children We have some 

parents who manifest a total indifference to their children's minds and 
morals, and suffer them to roam, like their cattle, without restraint. 



u 



COLCHESTER. 

If a teacher is employed and school opened, parents should see that 
their children attend regularly and punctually. An absence of even 
one day in a week is almost as injurious to a pupil as absence the whole 
time. An attempt to go to school and staying away half the time is 
like half-doing any other piece of work, — worse than not trying to do it 
at all. None but those who have been watchful of its effects can con- 
ceive of the magnitude of the evil of irregular attendance at school. 

Punctuality is also very important. The evil of tardiness does not 
consist wholly in the fact that the school is disturbed thereby. The 
tardy scholar will be tardy through life, and cannot command the re- 
spect of his fellows. 

HARTFORD. * 

The method of registering attendance differs in different schools, so 
as to prevent entire accuracy in the report of some details. 

The whole number of children in the town, between the ages of four 
and sixteen, reported for the year, was six thousand eight hundred and 
nine ; the number registered in our public schools was four thousand 
and twenty-eight; the average daily attendance reported was two thou- 
sand six hundred and twenty-nine. After making all due allowance for 
the numbers taught in private schools, and for others whose absence can' 
be satisfactorily accounted for, the disproportion between the number of 
children of a proper age to attend school, and the number registered, is 
very large ; and the disproportion between the whole number and the 
actual average attendance is enormous. That out of six thousand eight 
hundred and nine children in the town, only two thousand six hundred 
and twenty-nine should be found, on an average, in our public schools; 
and that out of some four thousand actually registered, about one thou- 
sand four hundred should be daily absent, are facts which call for the 
most serious consideration of the Board, of district committees, of teach- 
ers, of parents, and, we may add, of our town authorities. 

NEW MILFORD. 

Of all the brakes attached to the car of education none can bear a 
comparison with that of irregularity in attendance. It unhinges classi- 
fication, retards the progress of regular pupils, and produces a general 



45 

deterioration in the whole school. Would it not be well to have a law 
enacted for the appointment of a school police in the district, whose 
duty it shall be, at the request of the teacher, to search out the truant 
and irregular pupils and take them to the room. 

REDDING. 

The average attendance on our schools does not exceed fifty per cent 
of the number registered. It is no uncommon occurrence to find on 
our visits not more than eight or ten present out of fifty numbered in 
the district. It is useless to procure good teachers and furnish the 
schools with all necessary appliances, as long as this glaring evil exists, 
and, if no remedy can be derived, then farewell to the efficiency of our 
common schools. We know that, in our country districts, it is some- 
times difficult tor small children to brave the* inclemency of the weather 
and walk a mile or two to school, but we know too that they are often 
allowed to remain at home for the most trivial thing and thus gain the 
idea that school is of very little consequence. We have done what we 
could to remedy this evil — by advice, entreaty, and invective — but we 
are thoroughly convinced that nothing but the strong arm of the law 
can prevent hundreds of our children from being thrown on our com- 
munity ignorant and vicious. Would not a law depriving those who 
were irregular in their attendance of the benefit of the school fund, 
remedy the evil? 

WESTBROOK. 

Irregularity of attendance is one of the greatest drawbacks on the 
prosperity of our schools. This is an evil to be complained of in very 
many common schools, but the schools in this town, we are very sorry 
to say, compare unfavorably with the other district schools of the State 
in the particular referred to, Indeed, in one or two of the districts of 
this town, the evil is so great, as to have destroyed almost wholly the 
value of the school. 

Of the whole number attending our district schools the daily average 
attendance has been less than two-thirds of the number registered. 

It is very important that children should be trained to habits of 
punctuality and order. The practice of allowing them to stay away 
from school whenever their fancy or pleasure may suggest is a very 
serious mistake on the part of their parents. It interferes with the order 



46 

of the school and is very discouraging to the teacher and bad in its in- 
fluence on the other scholars. It not only causes those who are delin- 
quent to fall behind in their studies, but the whole class of which they 
are members must be kept back by such scholars, or else these irregular 
ones must fall behind their class [tisal o a waste of the public money. 
The time and wages of the teacher go on, whether there are few or many 
at school on any given day. If only two-thirds of the pupils are pres- 
ent, then, on an average, one-third of the public money is wasted. 



Discipline. 
HARTFORD. 



In general, tiie discipline of the schools has been judicious and effect- 
ive. Our district committees generally are as strongly impressed with 
the importance of order in sustaining a school, as of any other qualifi- 
cation ; and it is believed that more removals are made, and made 
wisely, for want of ability to govern a school well, than for any lack of 
literary qualifications. This is just. No intellectual attainments can 
compensate for the inability to maintain a kind, but firm and efficient 
discipline. 

There is a limited class of scholars in our schools whose case demands 
attention and decided action. Prematurely old, precocious in sin, blas- 
phemous, vulgar, dishonest, and utterly regardless of truth, their influ- 
ence on the young minds with which they come in contact is ruinous. 
Such ought not to be allowed to remain in our public schools. Provision 
should be made for them, if it does not already exist in some of the in- 
stitutions which the wisdom of the State or the town has founded. We 
are aware of the objection against casting these children oft' from the 
influence of better companions. But in nine cases out of ten we believe 
the influence is quite the other way — the bad child ruins the good one; 
the £Ood one does not save the bad one. We doubt whether anv more 
imperative duty rests upon our district committees than to see that this 
class of pupils is removed from our schools. Our town authorities 
would, undoubtedly, cooperate in providing for their proper training. 



47 



MANCHESTER. 

The hindrances which stand most prominently in the way of further 
speedy improvement in our common schools are few, but almost insur- 
mountable, if future hope must depend upon past success. One of them, 
the selection of unsuitable, teachers, has been alluded to. Another, the 
want of proper discipline in our schools, requires special mention in this 
place. No one who visits our common schools will question the asser- 
tion, that a large majority of the teachers who fail in their efforts to 
teach successfully, do so from a lack of ability to institute and preserve 
order ; and no one of any experience, or reflection, believes that a teacher 
can teach successfully without that faculty. Sometimes the fault is al- 
most wholly with the teacher; but usually the parents are equally re- 
sponsible. They are too apt to interfere and thwart the faithful en- 
deavors of the instructor to maintain a healthy discipline. They do not 
like the mode adopted by the teacher of enforcing obedience to the 
rules. Their children shall not be corrected in this or that way, or at 
all ; and not unfrequently they remove them from the school, thus en- 
couraging disobedience, injuring the school much, and their own chil- 
dren more, and discouraging all efforts to make the school room a place 
of quiet and systematic labor. Your Board would earnestly expostulate 
with any parents who may be inclined thus to interfere with the man- 
agement of our schools. The practice has already worked great mis- 
chief, and if at all common in any district must destroy the usefulness 
of the teacher and ruin the school. And generally it is inexcusable. 
Any complaint made to the school visitors, of improper or severe pun- 
ishment inflicted on a pupil, will receive prompt investigation ; and few 
cases can occur which they will be unable to settle satisfactorily. . Un- 
usual or harsh punishments they will not sanction ; though they fully 
believe that ten fold more children are injured in these days by exces- 
sive indulgence than by excessive chastisement. Perhaps this injurious 
practice has arisen, to a considerable extent, from the mistaken notion, 
that a parent has the same authority over a child in school as at home, 
and an absolute right to decide as to studies and government. There is 
not a greater error. The common school is a State institution, established 
and in the greater part maintained by State bounty, managed according 
to State laws, and designed for the general good of the inhabitants of 
the State. A parent may avail himself of the advantages it affords for 
the education of his child, but has no more right to dictate as to the 
management or instruction of that child, while in school, than a father 



48 



has to control his son while in college, or at West Point. Otherwise, 
every parent becomes, so far as his children are concerned, a school visi- 
tor ; and in the multitude of various and often conflicting opinions, all 
order and organization are lost, and with them all the benefit which 
might have been derived from the school. 

NEW HAVEN. 

In the practical working of so large an organization as our public 
schools, with which, during the year, probably more than ten thousand 
different pupils and parents are connected by their daily duties or their 
nearest affections, it would be strange if complaints respecting some 
portion of their management w T ere not frequently made. These com- 
plaints, however, are of less common occurrence than may be supposed. 
In nine cases out of ten they are the result of mistakes or of passion ; 
or the conduct complained of indicates at most only such a want of 
judgment as the kindest and best of parents sometimes show, rather 
than any general want of fitness for the duties of instruction and gov- 
ernment. The partial and one sided statement of a child is often taken 
for granted, and complaint is made to the Board without conference 
with the teacher and without giving the latter an opportunity for ex- 
planation. If, in all cases where a parent feels aggrieved, a representa- 
tion of the grievance was made to the Principal, much unpleasant feel- 
ing to all parties might be spared. When occasion for censure exists, 
the Board have never hesitated to express it. 

The chief object of our school law is to give a thorough elementary 
education to all the children of the community. It largely trusts to 
parental affection, even under the most unfavorable circumstances of 
poverty or vice, to see that no child is debarred at least from that meas- 
ure of knowledge which is necessary to all. While the statute provides 
for extreme cases of parental neglect, no case has been known of the en- 
forcement of the statute for many years. The school laws were evi- 
dently made with reference to the state of society existing in most of the 
towns of the State. The peculiarities of a community like New Haven, 
with a population of between forty and fifty thousand, have in no way- 
been provided for. Hundreds of boys roam about our streets whose 
parents are indifferent to the habits they acquire. A better clas9 of 
parents who are not so much indifferent to the well-doing of their 
children as they are thoughtless and careless, tolerate frequent irregulari- 



49 

ties and regard as a hardship any seventy of punishment for truancy. 
For these evils the law provides no adequate remedy. A parent may, 
indeed, cause the arrest of a truant child, but no teacher and no school 
officer can. All the authority the teacher has is derived from the Board 
of Education, who are required by law to prescribe rules for the govern- 
ment of the schools, and the power of the Board in this respect is lim- 
ited by the superior authority of the parent. As our population in- 
creases, the necessity for additional legislation on the subject is becom- 
ing more apparent. 

NEW MILFORD. 

Observation and experience have fully convinced us that nearly all 
the failures that occur in our schools arise from want of proper disci- 
pline and management at the very outset of the term. 



General Remarks. 

BERLIN. 



It seems very desirable that the office of district committee should be 
more permanent. If the number were three, one being appointed an 
nually and two holding over, it would tend to remedy many of the evils 
now suffered. One of these evils is the failure in making re- 
turns, resulting from inexperience. Another is the failure to get good 
teachers from the fact that the best are often engaged before the 
committees are appointed. 

BRISTOL. 

Although our teachers have been faithful and done well yet they have 
been unable to accomplish what they might have done under more 
favorable circumstances^ Among the causes which greatly retard the 
progress of schools is the lack of interest on the part of parents, and 
the irregular attendance of the pupils. 

"When we consider the fact that only about seven-tenths of the pupils 
enrolled are in daily attendance, we are surprised that so much has been 
accomplished. 

4 



50 

In those districts in which the attendance was most regular, and in 
which there was most interest on the part of parents, there has been the 
greatest improvement. 

At the examinations of our schools the scholars who have been most 
regular give character to the school, while the irregular ones are left in 
the background, taking but little iuterest in the exercises. 

CANTERBURY. 

The importance of education is readily acknowledged; but few, how- 
ever, have attained to that enlarged view of the subject that leads them 
to devise liberal things. Hence the town appropriations for school pur- 
poses are limited to the requirements of the statute law. Hence it 
often happens that in securing a teacher the committee of the district 
asks for the cheapest, rather than for the best. The wealth of the com- 
munity deems it a hardship to pay the small assessment which the law 
demands, — forgetting, or having never learned, her own paramount 
obligation to the school and the college. The fact that our property, as 
a nation, may be traced directly to our institutions of learning as one 
of its chief sources, has but little weight with many who are reaping 
large harvests from this sowing of the fathers. 

Some, who are considered good financiers, make great mistakes on 
this subject. They have not learned, or, having learned, repudiate the 
truth that no investment pays better thaji money judiciously appropria- 
ted to education. For the State, the city, the town, the district, this is 
an important practical truth. What one thing tends so powerfully to 
promote the agricultural, the manufacturing, the commercial interests 
of a community as a judicious system of public schools ? It is hard- 
ly possible to estimate the difference between a State with such a sys- 
tem, established by law, and a State where education is left to take care 
of itself. Doubtless it is a personal advantage to every one who re- 
ceives the benefit of the public schools. Hence it is inferred, by many, 
that those who enjoy the advantages of the schools should pay the ex- 
pense of the same. We often hear it said — " I have educated my 
children and why should I be taxed to pay for the schooling of others?" 
If this were the whole truth, and others were equally able to educate 
their children, the above question would be pertinent. But as the facts 
are it fails utterly. Many of the children of this State, probably the 
majority, are those whose parents are too poor to provide for their edu- 
cation. But, say some, the school fund was established for this very 



51 

purpose. While we admit that this fund has done good service, we 
contend that it is wholly inadequate to the present emergencies. It is 
undoubtedly best that the towns should feel obligated to provide for 
their own educational interests. The school is a public necessity, — a 
public good, — greater than can be expressed in dollars and cents. 
Therefore the property of the town and of the district should sustain 
it. The private advantage to the individual is not equal to the good 
that accrues to the community. 

The public road is an advantage to every one who uses it. Why 
not, then, give up our present free system and resort to the turnpike 
system, so that ever}' one shall pay for the use of the road whenever he 
uses it ? Why not, as well as for every parent to pay for the education 
of his child ? Is it said that roads are a public necessity ? Schools 
are more needful. Are roads a public benefit ? Schools are a greater. 
Is it said that all the community use the roads, while the schools are 
only for the children ? How is it with the aged and infirm who are 
confined at their homes ? Is their property for that reason exempt from 
the road tax ? By no means. Why ? Because the road is a public 
advantage. If, then, it is right to maintain at the public cost what is 
for the public good, — and if free schools are an advantage to the com- 
munity, it is right that the property of the community should be taxed 
for their support. We may extend this comparison. Good roads in- 
crease the value of property. Good schools do the same thing more 
decidedly. The road tax brings back to the tax payer more than an 
equivalent in the increased value of his estate. So, also, with the 
school tax. It is a well attested truth that property in the vicinity of 
a good school is held at a higher price on that account, and will com- 
mand a higher rate in the market. 

If this town would double the amount of its appropriation for school 
purposes, and continue to do so for a series of years, there can be no 
reasonable d'oubt that the valuation of the property of the town would 
increase far beyond the amount of the tax. And if the several districts 
would act on the same principle, they would experience a like result. 
But so lon^ as every man is acting only for self and thinking how to 
lessen his present taxes, it is vain to look for any marked improvement 
in our schools. So long as the town regards the subject of education as 
an evil to be borne, with what patience it can command, rather than as 
a priceless blessing, a fountain of good to be cherished and enlarged ; 
so long as cheap teachers are sought rather than those who can com- 
mand good compensation because of their thorough qualification for 



52 

their work, so long will our schools languish. As in agriculture a 
generous tillage is the most successful and the most economical ; so in 
the cultuse of the mind, "There is that scattereth and yet increaseth ; 
and there is that withholdetfl more than is mete, and it tendeth to 
poverty." 

EAST HARTFORD. 

What we need, apparently, more than anything else, is an awakening 
of parents to the fact that they have any personal interest in our 
schools farther than to employ a teacher, and have him approbated by 
the examining committee. Anything that shall rouse parents to the re- 
sponsibility they have in the matter above and beyond committees of 
whatever kind or nature, should be bailed with gladness by all true 
friends of education. What shall produce a result so desirable we do 
not feel able to indicate, — but sure, we feel, that something is needed 
in this direction. 

EAST WINDSOR. 

In order to make our common schools what they ought to be and 
what they were designed to be, the whole influence of the community 
must be exerted in their favor. Men of influence, position and wealth, 
must give their influence and support to the common school. This 
noble institution needs the influence and support of all classes. 

Men of standing and wealth cannot in any way do more to bless the 
world than by making the free institutions of our State and nation per- 
petual, and more extensive in their influence, than by strengthening and 
extending the foundations upon which they rest. 

If men would do good to their country and the world, let them give 
their hearty influence and support to the district schools. They will 
thus embalm their memory in the hearts of a grateful people. 

FARMINGTON. , 

The employment of incompetent teachers, irregular and unseasona- 
ble attendance, insufficient appropriations of money and frequent change 
of teachers and committees, are among the obstacles to the improve- 
ment of our schools. How can these be remedied ? W'hence do they 
spring? Manifestly from many subordinate causes, which are all to be 
traced ultimately to a want of interest in education on the part of a too 
busy, money-making public. We are all ready to admit the value of 






53 

common schools, — no matter how strong the language of praise, yet 
what results do we see commensurate with all our fine words ? Whence 
this apathy and indifference? Can we not find it explained by the old 
adage which tells us " what costs us nothing is worth nothing?" Too 
many districts will not pay teachers one cent more than they receive 
from the public money, and make that suffice either by hiring the 
cheapest teachers to be found, or by shortening the length of the term, 
or by both. Is it not true that our splendid school fund, which ought 
to make our schools the first in the land, is really used so as to relieve 
districts from any need of self-exertion, — dping for them what they 
ought to do for themselves ? 

GUILFORD. 

In most of our districts the committees were fortunate in securing 
teachers of experience and success. These teachers entered their 
schools with an intelligent appreciation of their duties, and a deep sense 
of their responsibilities. 

The Teachers' Institute, held here during the first week in November, 
had a salutary effect on our teachers, bringing the subject of education 
more directly before them, and awakening in them a deeper sense of 
their duties and obligations, so that the general progress of our schools 
has been commendable and, in some districts, entirely satisfactory. 

The lectures, in connection with the Institute, aroused the commu- 
nity to the importance of common school education, and awakened a 
deeper interest in our schools, as is evident from the more frequent 
visits to them, and if the teachers have not received all the encourage- 
ment due, there has been less fault-finding than in previous years. 

HADDAM. 

In all iinportaut matters involving the good of our schools, it is obvi- 
ous that there should be harmony of action in the districts, — and that 
all should cooperate in sustaining the schools. 

In this age of general progress, it is manifest that elevated standards 
of improvement should be plainly revealed, and that their relative 
importance should be suitably recognized. And among the more 
valuable standards, is the one which contemplates the symmetrical 
development and culture of the physical, intellectual and moral powers 
of the rising generation. Now such a standard, we think, has been set 
forth in the more recent and improved systems of education with which 



we have been favored, and the principles of which, our Normal School, 
Teachers' Institutes and Common School Journal have ably discussed 
and maintained. 

Upon what nobler objects can we bestow our sympathies and our 
means, than upon the intellectual and moral fields which are furnished 
in our youth ? 

If New England retains her relative influence and power among her 
sister states, how will she do it? Not by her limited territorial domain, 
nor by her comparative population merely, but mainly, and in virtue of 
her intellectual and moral power, as developed and fostered by a 
thorough and extended culture. 

HAMDEN. 

In reviewing the history of our schools for the last twenty years, we 
can see that there has been improvement. Our school houses are in a 
better condition and better furnished with whatever the pupils need to 
help them in their studies. The teachers are better qualified for their 
work.. The attendance is more general and regular. Many parents 
manifest more interest in the education of their children. But while 
we may rejoice at what has been done, let us not forget that much 
remains to be done to make our schools in the highest degree, successful 
and useful. 

HUNTINGTON. 

We have twelve school houses and eleven schools for less than three 
hundred scholars, and nearly one fourth of the latter are in one district 
and more than fifty in another, so that some of our schools are very small 
and need not be kept up, but so long as they can get the public money 
to waste they will have cheap teachers. We sometimes think it would 
be better if we had no public money. We believe all our schools 
should be free. 

Most of our teachers receive two dollars per week, and beg their 
board from house to house, — a miserable plan. 

MERIDEN. 

The experiment of Free Schools for the past year has met with uni- 
versal favor. While it has been a relief, pecuniarily, to many of our 
citizens, it has been regarded with equal favor by those w T ho have borne 



55 

the burdens. One evidence of its benefits has been the largely increased 
attendance. 

The finances have been more simply and economically managed, and 
the experience of one year proves (to us at least) that this is the only 
just and proper method of securing to all, the benefits of a good educa- 
tion. 

There are eleven District Schools in the town, one consisting of three 
departments, three of two departments each, and seven mixed schools 
of only one. 

In these schools have been employed four male and twenty-one 
female teachers ; nine have taught in the same school through the year, 
and seven have been engaged in the same school a longer time, ranging 
from two to seven years. 

" As is the teacher, so is the school," is a motto which has been 
fully verified during the past year, and convinces us that we should seek, 
and be willing to pay, those who are in all respects best qualified for 
their position, and retain them as long as possible, as the truest econ- 
omy, since a good education is the best legacy we can leave to our 
children. 

Nor should the primary teacher be underestimated, as it is just here 
that the children are to be started in their educational career, and it is 
of the utmost importance that they begin right, to form good habits. 
The idea that any one will do for a primary teacher is as false in theory 
as it has been pernicious in practice. > 

The discipline in some of our schools has improved, while in others 
it has not been as good as could be desired. 

In some of our mixed schools we endeavored to have the little chil- 
dren occupied during the intervals of their lessons, since the activity of 
the joung will expend itself in some direction, and it had better be 
turned to good account. All should, at least, be provided with slates 
on which they can copy lessons from the book, or simple drawings from 
copies given by the teacher upon the blackboard. Frequent change is 
needed for this class of children, and we heartily approve of singing 
and simple manual exercises introduced at intervals, to relieve the 
tedium of the school room. 

We like the practice of some schools of dismissing them at an earlier 
hour, for after they have spent as much time as would be profitable, 
further confinement is not only unnecessary, but injurious. We are glad 
to notice in some of our schools that a better system has prevailed, and 



56 

that a time has been set apart for study and recitations, and that the 
same system has been carried into the minute details of the school. 

There has also been improvement in methods of instruction, on the 
part of some teachers who have had a well digested plan of their own, 
while others whose ideas have not been so clearly defined have worked 
somewhat at random, and with less satisfactory results. 

While there has been much improvement in reading, too little impor- 
tance has been attached to this branch by some of our teachers. They 
allow their pupils to read whole passages, and pass on when they do 
not at all understand their meaning. Others have been very thorough 
in drilling their classes upon each passage and sentence, and do not 
allow them to proceed until they are thoroughly understood and prop- 
erly rendered. 

The importance of teaching writing systematically has been urged 
upon the teachers. The improvement in other branches has generally 
been satisfactory. 

There has been great diversity in the time of beginning the different 
schools, and the length of the terras, and considerable inconvenience 
has been experienced in consequence. 

It is desirable that all districts should commence their schools early 
in September, so as to bring the terms within the limits of the school 
year. 

The schools are very generally supplied with outline maps, while a 
few have libraries, and some apparatus. 

Parents must visit schools more, if they would have their children 
take the interest desired, and also encourage the teachers in their labors* 
Doubtless they find their time mostly occupied with other duties ; but 
we can conceive of none more important than the education of their 
children. 

Owing to the largely increased and rapidly growing population of our 
town, more school accommodation and important changes are impera- 
tively required for the better education of our children. But since the 
report of the Chairman of the Board on the reorganization of districts, 
pursuant to the vote of the last annual town meeting, and which is 
appended to this, contains a matured plan for the management of 
schools, it renders any special recommendations on our part unnecessary. 

MIDDLETOWN. 

The importance of a well-regulated system of common schools, so 
thoroughly appreciated by our fathers, and for which such liberal pro- 



57 

vision has been made by legislative enactments and pecuniary endow- 
ment, has never been more apparent than during the past three years. 
In that time ample opportunities have been afforded for a comparison 
of those portions of our country where such institutions have been 
fostered and multiplied, with those parts where the public school has 
been a rarity and where the blessings of a good education were con- 
fined to the few whose parents had abundant means to provide private 
instruction for their children, or to send them abroad to acquire the 
knowledge deemed essential to fit them for the social position they were 
to occupy at home. 

Ignorance is the tool of the tyrant. By it all species of deception 
are sustained, and by it are the liberties of a people destroyed. Igno- 
rance and degradation go hand in hand, both in the family and the 
State. And that family is most thrifty, that State most prosperous, 
where the greatest care is bestowed upon the education of its children. 
This view of the relative educational condition of the two great 
sections and of the causes which have operated in producing such 
results should lead us to prize more highly our common school system, 
and to take a just pride in every measure that will tend to its improve- 
ment. No money ean be more profitably invested than that which is 
devoted to the erection of comfortable school buildings, — providing 
suitable books and apparatus, and the employment of capable teachers. 
And with our present sad national experience it would be well to add 
to our course of instruction an exposition of the Constitution of the 
United States, and the nature of a Republican Government, that the 
mind of the rising generation may be thoroughly indoctrinated in those 
principles which shall better qualify them to discharge their duties as 
American citizens, 

There is a saying that " man is the creature of circumstances." It 
is especially true of the child that his habits, modes of thought, and 
general culture, are dependent upon the influence of his position and 
the objects by which he is surrounded. There may be, and doubtless 
are, children whose extraordinary intellectual endowments will cause 
them to rise superior to all adverse influences ; but it is nevertheless 
true of ihe majority that their character for life depends upon the asso- 
ciations, as well as the literary advantages attending their youth. The 
style of the school house — the taste displayed in its internal arrange- 
ment — the excellence of the seats and desks — the adornment of its 
walls, and the conveniences for the cleanliness of the pupil, — all operate 



58 

to produce habits of neatness in dress — politeness and correctness of 
deportment — and emulation in study, that would be wanting in the 
absence of these associations. The ravages of the jack-knife and the 
defaeings with charcoal and chalk so common in the old-fashioned 
school-house, are not to be found in the more modern building, where 
the walls and furniture approach in excellence those of our home par- 
lors, and the child is taught by his surroundings that parents and the 
public have a care for his comfort. 

And why in these days should we not exercise this care, and show 
this interest in the comfort of our children ? We remodel and adorn 
our churches, — we arrange for their ventilation and warmth — we pro- 
vide cushions and carpets where but once a week we sit for perhaps 
two or three hours, and yet for the little ones who sit for twice that 
time for five days in the w T eek we can only afford a hard bench, and an 
inconvenient desk where they may wearily pursue their studies, and 
justly long for the hour that shall close their tasks, or the more welcome 
freedom of the vacation. 

NEW HAVEN. 

No place on the American Continent presents probably so great 
facilities for general and professional education as the city of New 
Haven. The largest institution of learning in the country is in the 
midst of us ; professional schools of high reputation for the study of 
Law, Medicine and Divinity, have long been established; private 
munificence has within a few years erected and endowed a school for 
both scientific and practical education in Chemistry, Geology. Metal- 
lurgy, Industrial Mechanics, and Engineering. In connection with this 
school, provision has recently been made for the more general study of 
the Natupal Sciences, of Literature, Modern Languages, History, and 
Commercial Law. During the past year, more than a quarter of a 
million dollars have been bestowed by public spirited citizens of this 
and other communities upon New Haven institutions of learning. By 
almost the unanimous vote of the Legislature of the State, the proceeds 
arising from the sale of public lands appropriated to Connecticut by 
Congress for "the liberal and practical education of the industrial 
classes" is to be expended in New Haven. In conformity with the 
legislation both of the General and State Government in respect to this 
grant, a systematic course of instruction in Agriculture and the Mechanic 
Arts is soon to be commenced. Official notice has already appeared in 



59 

the public prints that gratuitous instruction will be given in these 
studies annually to a considerable number of properly qualified young 
men belonging in this State. 

Such are the opportunities for a higher education provided at home 
for our own children and the children of our fellow- citizens. The ben- 
efits of these establishments of learning are indeed common to us with 
all others who wish to profit by them. New Haven possesses only the 
incidental advantage of having these institutions at its own door. This 
advantage, however, is of incalculable value, both as attracting families 
to our city in considerable numbers as permanent residents, and as giv- 
ing opportunities for education to our own children such as are possessed 
by the inhabitants of few cities in the civilized world. Before a young 
man of limited means, resident out of the State or elsewhere in the 
State, can avail himself of these facilities for instruction, he rnust pro- 
vide the means of defraying the expense of living away from home and 
in a populous city. This expense is spared to our own sons. The 
number of parents among us is large who can educate their sons as 
engineers, as scientific mechanics, as analytic chemists or for professional 
life, but who cannot afford the expense incident to such an education 
elsewhere. To the rich, indeed, economy in education is of compara- 
tively little consequenee. To those of moderate means it is everything. 
In former years the proportion of young men in our higher institutions 
of learning who were the sons of men in humble or moderate circum- 
stances was greater than at present The higher cost and more expen- 
sive modes of living, the increasingly remunerative employments open 
to very young men, together with the wonderful development of manu- 
facturing industry, have united to withdraw, at an early age, from study 
large numbers of young men dependent chiefly upon their own exer- 
tions for support, and have filled our colleges more largely than was 
formerly the case with the sons of wealthier men. In a country like 
ours it seems most undesirable, on grounds of public policy, that the 
higher kinds of education should be chiefly confined to the wealthy. 
Even in the old world, where theories of society are wholly aristocratic, 
all the great endowments for instruction have been established upon the 
idea that it is a measure of public utility to encourage the education of 
the less opulent classes of the community. There is scarcely a univer- 
sity or any higher institution of learning in Europe in which the 
patronage of the State or private benefactions have not made large 
provision for gratuitous or partly gratuitous education. Much more 
should it be regarded as a fundamental principle in a country, the 



60 

tendency of most of whose institutions and laws is to give equal oppor- 
tunities to the poor with the rich, that facilities in large measure -hould 
be given to young men of marked ability, who are not possessed of 
adequate means to secure the higher education they desire. In former 
. Yale College rendered great service to society by preparing young 
men for professional life. By the establishment of these more recent 
schools for scientific and practical instruction in the great industrial 
occupations of life, the College in some of its departments will become 
more and more identified with the prosperity of New Haven, will be 
felt by many to be no longer isolated from the common business of life, 
and will contribute more directly than ever it has done to make New 
Haven a desirable place of residence for those who wish for their sons 
the most complete education the country can afford, in preparation for 
whatever occupations they may select. The relations which necessarily 
must subsist between these more advanced institutions of learning and 
the public schools under the care of the Board of Education, as offering 
unusual opportunities for education to the youth of our city, has seemed 
to me of sufficient importance to justify this distinct reference to one 
of the great advantages which New Haven enjoys in a higher degree 
than most communities in this country or in the old world. 

Our city now possesses a completely organized system of public school 
instruction for the education of our children from the earliest age at 
which instruction from books can properly be given, to a thorough 
preparation for business, for admission to schools of industrial science, 
or to college. 

PI/YMOUTH. 

While all are ready to admit that the success of a community, state 
or nation, depends upon the intelligence and virtue of the people, few 
seem to realize the feet that the common school is the most important 
instrumentality of this object. Napoleon said k; The bayonets that 
think conquer." Our common schools teach bayonets to think ; they 
train the future aliens and rowdies to be law-abiding and peaceable 
citizens. In peace they are excellent substitutes for navies, arsenals 
and standing armies. Then let us heartily sustain our public schools, 
nor grudge the expense. And let us do all in our power to speed the 
day when they shall be established in every part of our land; — then 
when our enemies sound the tocsin of war, we shall be ready and cer- 
tainly conquer, it may be, without the sacrifice of blood. 



61 



PUTNAM. 

The existing system of frequent changes of district committees, in 
many instances works unfavorably to the permanency of good teachers. 
Each newly elected committee has often a personal partiality for some 
relative or near friend, and in some instances it is so strong as to over- 
ride the wishes of a majority .of a district, and such a one is put in the 
place of a former incumbent who has successfully taught the school. 
This is done with the expectation, it may be, that the successor will 
prove equally efficient. But the experiment often fails, and is always 
an injudicious one. Personal preferences should be waived when 
necessary to promote harmony and the best interests of a district. We 
would suggest whether the choice of a majority of a district should 
not govern the action of their committee, and suggest also, whether the 
Board of Visitors may not have more power in the matter. 

As our population and wealth increases, especially in the two village 
districts, a union of those districts, and the adoption of the grading 
system, becomes more desirable than ever. Wherever such a system is 
adopted, it is successful and satisfactory, and in no community do cir- 
cumstances more favor the adoption of this system than our own. We 
would earnestly commend the subject to the careful consideration of 
those who desire to promote the honor and true interests of the town. 

The great advantages of school libraries seem not to be fully appre- 
ciated in this town. But two have been formed, and these have not 
been replenished for some years. It would seem that the generous offer 
of the State to bear one-half of the expense of such libraries, would 
encourage the establishment of a greater number of these valuable 
sources of information and entertainment. An increase of apparatus, 
globes, maps and books of reference, would also be a great improve- 
ment. 

We again urge the policy of defraying all the expenses incident to 
the school by a tax upon the property, instead of upon the scholar, as 
now done. It w r ould remove one obstacle to an attendance on the part 
of the poorer portion of the community, especially among foreigners. 

POMFRET. 

Uniformity in text books is an absolute necessity to the greatest 
advance. It helps to secure the best system of classification, and the 
largest economy of time, with both teacher and pupil. This uniformity 



02 

can be secured only by the direct and binding action of the Board ; 
excluding all books which are not introduced by their authority. That 
has now been done, and we reasonably anticipate the happiest results. 

RIDGEFIELD. 

A ^ood degree of order and discipline has been maintained in most 
. and the pupils have shown due respect to their teachers, — and 
this we regard as of great importance in any school. 

The neat and clean appearance of the school rooms and pupils have 
attracted our attention and commanded our admiration whenever we 
have visited the schools. * * * 

The semi-annual change of teachers is the bane of progress in our 
schools, — and until districts resolve to engage experienced and compe- 
tent teachers and retain them for successive terms, if possible, the 
education of our youth will fall far short of the demand of the times. 

ROCKY HILL. 

There is a general indifference in our community respecting the 
means of public education, and until this is remedied we can have but 
little hope of improvement in our schools. Our district meetings are 
usually attended but by four or five persons, and the visits of parents 
to the school-room are but few and very far between. We need some- 
thing to galvanize us iuto a higher degree of life for our schoo.- : — 
perhaps that something may come some day, but the immediate pros- 
pect is not encouraging. 

ROXBURY. 

A serious impediment to the prosperity of our schools is the apathy 
of parents. Instead of visiting the schools and witnessing for them- 
selves what is there transpiring, and encouraging both teacher and 
pupils by their presence, they too often trust to outside reports, or the 
often inaccurate accounts of the pupils relating to the cha-acter and 
condition of the school, and thus form very erroneous opinions which 
might be corrected by an occasional visitation of the school. * * * 

If district committees would employ only experienced ^..chers or 
graduates of our normal school, our schools would prove far more 
successful and useful than thev have been. 



63 



SHARON. 

Our school houses throughout the town remain the same as last year, 
except so far as changed by use and exposure to the elements. Several 
of them are good, as compared with poorer ones, but only that in No. 
10, which was erected two years ago, is good in the sense of being 
properly fitted for its use. 

The great want of our schools is interest on the part of the community, 
particularly the more influential part. If this could be awakened we 
doubt not that we could report very great improvement. 

SOUTHINGTON. 

We think it must be plain to every one familiar with our schools 
that they are steadily improving. It is true that we do not in all cases 
secure the best men for committees, nor always the best teachers. But 
when w compare our schools with those of other towns around us and 
consider that a majority of our teachers are furnished by our own schools, 
we have reason to rejoice that our schools do so much. 

But our schools need more attention. To secure their true progress 
and elevation will require constant vigilance and the sympathy and hearty 
cooperation of all concerned. ****** 

We think it would be a great improvement upon the prevailing cus- 
tom if all who intend to patronize our schools would be willing to attend 
the annual district meeting and interest themselves in what all must 
feel to be a public benefit. 

NEWTOWN. 

Parents are negligent, altogether too negligent of their duties, and 
seldom visit the school room unless to give the teacher a " blowing up " 
for some real or imagined wrong. 

A Teachers' Institute was held here last spring under the direction of 
the Hon. David N. Camp, Superintendent of Schools. The exercises 
were very interesting and profitable, and were, it is believed, productive 
of much good to those of our teachers who availed themselves of the 
opportunity of attending. 

SCOTLAND. 

We feel that more attention should bo given to the elementary 
studies in our schools. The. effect of striving to advance scholars to the 



64 

higher branches and of distracting their minds by attending to too 
many studies at the same time, is not good. A mere smattering of 
knowledge, — knowing a little of a great many things, and not knowing 
any one well or perfectly, is not of much use. The £reat thing is to 
know what we do know thoroughly ; then we can command it ; then we 
can use it ; then it can be of service to us. 

TRUMBULL. 

The chief fault with our teachers has been, as heretofore, an inability 
to govern properly, — a fault that seems to increase from year to year. 

Parental indifference, and lack of cooperation with the teachers, con- 
stitute a serious obstacle to the success of our schools. Instead of care- 
fully scrutinizing the conduct and management of the teacher and assist- 
ing him in his arduous labors, by the judicious bestowment of praise or 
reproof, as the case may require, parents, for the most part, seem content 
to let him go on in his own way, scarcely knowing whether he is ren- 
dering any equivalent for his wages or whether their children are pro- 
gressing in their studies or wasting their precious time in idleness. 

The character and carriage of a teacher outside the school room have 
generally more influence in making up his reputation than scholastic ex- 
cellence, or rare ability to teach and govern. 

As a whole, our schools are probably in as favorable a coudition as 
those in most of the rural towns in this section of the State, but far 
short of that degree of excellence which the facilities of the times have 
made available. 

WESTBROOK. 

No teacher, however well qualified to teach, can succeed without the 
friendly cooperation of the district. It is quite as impossible for a 
teacher, as for a minister of the gospel, to labor successfully without the 
sympathy and support of those for whom he labors. It is quite possible 
for a few mischief-makers to render all his efforts abortive. Nothing 
tends more directly to defeat his best endeavors for the good of his 
charge than for parents to discuss or criticise the defects of their teacher, 
or to speak disparagingly of him in the presence of their children. 

A school without order or discipline, like an army, is almost worth- 
less. It may be worse than none at all. Children should be required 
to respect and obey their teacher. It is impossible for the teacher to 
secure this without the cooperation of the parents of the district. They 



65 

must, for the good of their children, concede to the teacher all due 
authority, Or, if they are unwilling to do this, they had much better 
not send their children to school at all. A teacher who cannot be 
trusted to manage his school without interference is not fit to be em- 
ployed. 

WILL1NGTON. 

In reviewing the condition of our schools we would observe that 
whatever failures there have been on the part of teachers have resulted 
from the want of the proper discipline, rather than from deficiency in 
literary acquirements, and for this we fear that a great share of the 
blame rests with parents. 

A serious hindrance to the efficiency of our schools may be found in 
a lack of personal interest on the part of parents, which leads them to 
neglect visiting the school, and also in not seeing that their children are 
present regularly and punctually. 

A parent should be able to give some other reply, when asked how 
the school is progressing than, "i" guess pretty fair ; I haint heard 
nothing to the contrary." He should see for himself and know whereof 
he affirms. We would call attention to the fact that our best schools 
are those which receive most visits from parents. 

The want of uniformity in text books is still felt, and our endeavor to 
remedy it is as fast as may be without imposing too heavy burdens on 
paients for the purchase of books. 

WINDSOR. 

We may state in general that there has been a commendable interest 
on the part of the town in regard to the welfare of our schools. There 
were " Teachers' Meetings " during the winter and the school visitors 
were much pleased to know that the teachers visited the schools of other 
teachers that they might profit, if possible, from the methods of others. 
Prizes were offered by district committees and parents for excellence in 
composition and spelling. These have created much interest and lauda- 
ble strife on the part of the scholars, and will, it is hoped, be productive 
of future good. Those teachers have most excelled, as such always 
will, who know themselves what education means. 

WOODSTOCK. 

The acting school visitors, in presenting their report for another year, 
are sensible that the all-absorbing scenes transpiring in our country have 
had their peculiar influence, as well upon our educational institutions, 

5 



66 

M other branches of public importance. The high state of excitement 
o( been the moat favorable to sound intellectual and moral culture. 
While Borne of our schools have sustained a high rank, and deserve 
commendation for their success, there are others of which we cannot 
speak in so complimentary terms. Young men of talents and educa- 
tion, competent and faithful teach* with a noble ardor for their 
country's defense, have gone to the battle-fields, leaving their places to 
be filled, in some instances, with teachers of less experience and inferior 
qualifications. 

But, on the other hand, we have much to encourage us. The stirring 
scenes of the war have given a new impulse to certain branches of study. 
Scholars have become anxious for a better knowledge of the localities of 
these tragic scenes, of the prominent men of our country, and the char- 
acteristic features of our Government. Consequently there has been a 
marked improvement in the study of Geography and History, es- 
pecially of our own country. There is also an increased interest 
in the condition of school houses^ — a growing disposition either to 
build new ones, or repair the old ones, and supply them with modern 
conveniences, outline maps and other school appliances. 

Again, amid the pecuniary burdens of this war, our public schools 
have a peculiar advantage in being so little dependent on taxation. 
While Massachusetts lias an income from her State school fund of 
845,000, — that to be divided among about 325,000 children between 
the ages of five and fifteen, — Connecticut has an equal amount from her 
town deposit fund, and an annual income of about 8130,000 besides 
from the State school fund — and these to be divided among 109,000 
children between the ages of four and sixteen. 

These circumstances, together with the paramount importance of 
popular education, should stimulate us to increased exertions for the 
proper training of our children and youth. 



Graded Schools. 

WESTBROOK. 



The practice of grading district schools is becoming quite general in 
all parts of the country. In all the more populous districts it may be 
said to be universal. More than half the towns in this countv and a 



07 

large part of the towns of the State have one or more graded schools. 
This is effected in various ways: — 

1. When the district is large enough to admit of it the school is 
divided into two or more departments, with a teacher for each. 

2. "When the districts are smaller two or more of them unite and 
bring their smaller children into one room by themselves, and the more 
advanced pupils into another, without increasing the number of schools. 
In some cases all the districts in the town unite in sustaining one school 
of a higher grade for the more advanced scholars, and in this way they 
are able to enjoy all the advantages of an academy without much, if 
any, additional expense. 

The advantages of such an arrangement are so many and so obvious 
as to require no argument. It gives an opportunity for the better classi- 
fication of the scholars, and by reducing the number of classes in any 
school the teacher will have more time to devote to each class and with 
less distraction of mind. Such schools are more orderly and there is 
naturally more emulation among the scholars when there are so many 
of the same age and all pursuing the same studies, than when they are 
of all ages and only one or two in a class. 

It is not always necessary to increase the number of schools in order 
to enjoy the advantages of graded schools, and if the number is not in- 
creased there is little or no increase of expense. And in case one more 
school is rendered necessary to carry out the system, the additional ex- 
pense being shared by all who have children to be educated, are equally 
benefited — is but a very small tax on each one, while the advantages 
are many. This is the cheapest way of maintaining a high school in 
any community where there is no endowed academy. 



Parental Interest. 

COLCHESTER. 



Many parents seem to think that the progress of a school depends 
wholly on the teacher. But this is an error. Few parents realize that 
the interest of children in a school is affected by thatmanfested by their 
parents. 

When parents shall be willing to devote more time to school-visiting, 



68 

an 1 when they shall Bhow a greater interest in the education of their 
children, and in fitting them to he useful membersof society, we shall 
iding interest on tin- part of teachers and pupils, and the 
consequent elevation and improvement of our schools. 

EASTHADDAM. 

The relation of parents to the general success of the schools is still 
deservedly a matter of complaint — much more so, however, in some dis- 
trict- than others. There are districts in which the parents seem to 
give at least a reasonable attention to the welfare of the schools. Their 
presence at examination at the close of the term gives stimulus and en- 
couragement to the pupils, and shows, in some instances, that the en- 
couragement afforded by parents, both to teachers and scholars, has been 
felt all through the term. So far as we have observed, however, the 
larger village districts are more behind hand in this matter than the 
smaller farming districts. Some of the latter certainly deserve special 
commendation. 

LYME. 

Will parents continue, year after year, to let their children loiter 
away their time out of school and grow up in ignorance, when know- 
ledge is so easily obtained ? If children are thus allowed to absent 
themselves from the school-room and grow up in ignorance, they must 
suffer the unhappy consequences when they arrive at manhood. A 
knowledge of this, and free discussion in relation to it in our districts, 
and frequent visits to the schools by parents, would, we think, remedy 
the evil. Year after year passes away, and parents continue to know 
little or nothing about our schools, except by hearsay, — and that, often, 
through some pupil who has had his proper deserts at the end of the 
rod. Such a state of affairs evinces a Bad lack of interest on the part 
of parents. It is discouraging to both teachers and pupils, and leads 
them to partake, in a measure, of the same indifference. We long to 
see the time when parents generally will visit our schools and see how 
they are conducted. Then will our teachers be encouraged and pupils 
stimulated. 

MANSFIELD. 

We have had in operation >ixteen schools during the year, some of 
which have been very successful, while others have in some respects 
disappointed the expectations of their friends and patrons. We cann t 



69 

expect to realize the full benefit of our common school system until 
parents and others interested are aroused from their apathy to a more 
active interest in the training and education of our children and youth. 
There is still too much penuriousness apparent in some localities, both 
in reference to the school-house, its fixtures and surroundings, and in 
the employment of teachers. Some districts seem to have a mortal 
fear of extending their schools beyond the limit of recognition by law, 
while others have an equal horror of expending anything more than the 
public money. Yet on the whole we have, perhaps, realized all we 
ought to expect from the capital invested. 

MORRIS. 

Some one has said that the two influences most injurious to our 
schools were irregular attendance and a spirit of insubordination, to 
which we would add as a third, a lack of sympathy and want of co- 
operation on the part of parents. We do believe that if our teachers 
could receive the cordial sympathy and cooperation of parents, our 
schools would prove far more successful and useful than they now are. 

NAUGATUCK. 

Our schools, as a whole, are in a much better condition this year than 
they were a year ago. We have a corps of earnest, well qualified 
teachers, and they have discharged their duties faithfully. The principal 
drawback, which we lament, is a lack of interest and cooperation on 
the part of parents and tax payers. They evidently consider the com- 
mon school as an institution good enough in itself, provided it pays its 
own way. They would be glad to see it prosperous, — but they are not 
willing to take hold and do their part to make it so. 

NEW PRESTON. 

In all our schools, with a single exception, and that for only a part of 
the year, tifair degree of proficiency has been made. Yet we are con- 
strained to say that it has not been commensurate with our wishes or 
the importance of the interests involved. We think the failure to 
secure greater success is attributable to parental indifference and want 
of general interest in the subject of education. This indifference is 
much more prevalent in some districts than others. It manifests itself 



7t) 

in the irregular attendance of children, neglect to furnish a suitable 
supply of books, in thinly attended school meetings, in an indisposition 
to sustain the teacher in the enforcement of healthful rules and regula- 
tions, and in various other ways the benefits of a well-regulated and 
efficient school are apparently wholly disregarded. We believe two 
things to be indispensable requisites to a good school, — good teachers, 
possessing not only a high order of literary qualifications, but a tact 
and aptness to teach, and a character that will command the re>pect 
and esteem of youth, — and then a hearty support and cooperation on 
the part of the parents and members of the district. 

VERNON. 

There are many obstacles which our schools have to contend with, 
that have fallen under our notice during the past year or two. And we 
should notice first, the unpardonable apathy and want of interest of 
parents, as seen in their not visiting our schools and keeping a watchful 
eye over them. In some of our districts there are, indeed, a few 
parents and friends who visit the schools and encourage both teacher 
and pupil by their presence, but in some of them, very seldom is a visit 
made, except by the school visitor or committee. Our teachers very 
justly complain of a want of cooperation on the part of parents. The 
children are often poorly supplied with books. They are not punctual 
or regular in their attendance. Insubordination and want of applica- 
tion are too common. Now these, with various other evils, can be 
remedied and removed, only by the combined efforts of both parents 
and teachers. And the difficulties attending the complete suooes 
our schools are owing more to that want of interest on the part of 
parents and guardians, which leads them to neglect visiting the schools 
and providing, in every proper way, for their encouragement and pros- 
perity, and to promote a right spirit and arouse a right feeling on the 
part of pupils, than to any other cause. If parents would visit the 
schools, at least twice during each term, the influence of these visits 
would tell in a short time, in the greater prosperity of our schools. 

Let all do their whole duty faithfully, and our common schools, which 
to-day are the hope and glory of our own loved New England, will 
more nearly fulfill the great and noble objects for which they were 
established and have been maintained. 



71 

School-Houses. 

REDDING. 

Poor school-houses still continue to disgrace some of our districts. 
Buildings in which some of our wealthy farmers would not stable their 
cattle in the inclement season of winter, are used for school-houses. 
We have labored earnestly, and as faithfully as we could, to abate this 
evil, but without effect. We trust some law may soon be enacted which 
will compel school districts to provide suitable school-houses. 

STONINGTON. 

If any buildings in a community should be rendered convenient, 
tasteful and attractive, they should be the district school-houses. If 
parents acknowledge the happy effect upon the minds of children of 
the beauty of architecture, location and scenery around their dwellings, 
and the adorning of their ceilings with works of art and science, how 
much more should they feel its importance, when locating, building and 
finishing the district school-house. The district school-house, both in 
location, structure and adorning, should be the place and house of all 
others the most attractive and convenient of any house in the com- 
munity. In villages there should be a large and commodious yard, 
affording sufficient room and protection for purposes of play and recrea- 
tion. I regret that the houses in the 6th and 9th districts are not so 
located, and I would respectfully call the attention of the board to 
them, believing that the safety and good o:der of the scholars demand 
it. 

TRUMBULL. 

The school-houses in every district in the town, though plain, and in 
most cases small structures, are neat and comfortable, favorably con- 
trasting with those that, till quite recently, occupied their places. 

VERNON. 

AVe have to report a great neglect in the keeping of our school-houses 
in good and sufficient repair. Some are sadly neglected. They are not 
kept painted as they ought to be, inside or out. Glass remains unset 
for months, and they have the general appearance of neglect and 



72 

dilapidation., In some a considerable portion of the ceiling is fallen. 
In none of them are there those means for ventilation there ought to 
be. The heating apparatus in some is bad and neglected. A school- 
house should be kept well painted, inside as well as outside. The walls 
should be unbroken and kept white and clean. Everything inside and 
out should present a cheerful and attractive appearance. The desks 
and seats in some are not what they should be. In this age of science 
and progress, for a school-room to be furnished with a desk extending 
around the outside of the room, with hard oak boards with sticks stuck 
in, for seats, is certainly fifty years behind the times. 



Teachers. 

BRIDGEWATER. 



There is a tendency to a constant change of teachers in this town, — 
and not a single district has retained its teacher for two successive 
terms. This is to be regretted, as it would be for the interest of all 
concerned if well qualified teachers should be continued in the same 
school for successive years, — though it might involve the expenditure of 
a little more money. 

COLCHESTER, 

It is hoped that greater exertions will be made by teachers to thor- 
oughly fit themselves for their positions. It is not enough that one is 
able to answer the questions asked by the board of visitors, and thus 
secure a certificate, or that he knows simply what he is called upon to 
teach. He should understand the lessons thoroughly, and be able to 
explain them intelligibly. A good teacher should have an extensive 
knowledge of human nature, and common sense enough to use it so as 
to call forth the mental powers of the child, to educate him. Instead 
of making his pupils believe that the main object is to prepare lessons 
to recite, he will endeavor to create in them a thirst for knowledge, 
because of its superiority. 

GRISWOLD. 

We have employed a greater number of female teachers than usual, 
and find them well adapted and successful in districts in which a preju- 



73 

dice had previously existed against them as teachers. We have observed 
that those teachers who have made teaching their business, and intend 
to do so, are the best teachers. There are many who apply for a 
school who only wish to teach one term, that they may obtain a little 
spending money, and such generally offer their services at a low price, 
which to some districts is a great consideration. As a result of this 
those who make teaching their business, have to teach for much less 
than they ought. We hope that districts will, ere long, see the neces- 
sity for paying a little more, and thus securing experienced teachers. 

Our schools suffer materially from the frequent change of teachers. 
A new committee is elected who will have some friend or relative to 
put into the school, and the experienced teacher must seek employment 
elsewhere. This is a serious drawback on our public schools. 

GUILFORD. 

At the suggestion of the acting visitor, our teachers have visited 
each other's schools, as far as practicable, in company with him, — he 
having taken the responsibility of dismissing schools for this purpose. 

HADDAM. 

In regard to our teachers it gives us pleasure to report that most of 
them have performed their duties with a good degree of skill a-nd suc- 
cess. Several of them have excelled in their department of usefulness, 
and have ministered to both the improvement and happiness of their 
pupils, as will usually be the case when in connection with lucid and 
faithful instruction and judicious government, a due sympathy is mani- 
fested on the part of the teacher, and when that sympathy finds appro- 
priate expression in voice and manner. 

When the principle of love is deeply implanted in the heart of the 
teacher and is made to beam in his countenance, it will always prove a 
power of great efficacy in behalf of a school. In the absence of this 
principle, and its fitting and alluring manifestations, the most accom- 
plished teacher, in other respects, sometimes fails, to a greater or less 
extent, in the execution of bis work. 

MANCHESTER. 

So much of the success of our schools depends upon the. teachers 
that an annual recurrence to the subject of their selection and their 



74 

needed qualifications must be expected. The most important duty in 
the employment of teachers devolves on the district committee. He 
engages the candidate and decides on his most important qualities, viz. ; 
energy, faithfulness, experience, executive ability, and general aptitude 
for the business of instruction. The school visitors merely test his pro- 
ficiency in the stated branches, and can hardly refuse a candidate who 
comes up to the required mark Tn spite of them an unfit teacher may 
slip into a school ; and once in can do irremediable mischief before he 
can be removed. Experience has shown that it is entirely useless for 
the visitors or committee to labor against the incompetency of the 
teacher. As well attempt to cut grass with a lath, as to advance a 
school with a poor instructor at its head. The only sure mode is to 
keep incompetent teachers out of the schools ; and this, in the main, 
must be done by the committees. Their rules in the employment of 
candidates should be — to get a good teacher or none. Unless abso- 
lutely restricted by the district, to consider qualifications before price. 
To ask, as the first question of an applicant, — " What evidence can you 
give of your competency ?" not " What wages do you expect P' To 
select a stranger in preference to a near relative. To reject all proposals 
from those who wish to teach for pay merely, without regard to their 
usefulness. To choose, if possible, none but teachers of experience ; 
or, at least, only those of energetic character, with the disposition and 
physical ability to work. Districts should be careful not to restrict their 
committees in the matter of expense. It is an often repeated truth, that 
a poor teacher is dear at any price. The employment of such an one 
is a waste of the money paid him ; and what is vastly worse, is a waste 
of the time and opportunities of the children. In fact, a poor school is 
ordinarily worse than none at all. It would be far better for children to 
receive only parental care and instruction than to attend a school where 
neither their minds nor manners are improved — where they learn little 
that is good and much that is bad, and where, instead of accurate know- 
ledge, habits of study, and respectful behavior, they acquire vague and 
incorrect ideas, and grow lazy, insubordinate, and impudent. Parents 
have no right to hazard tin ir children's welfare by entrusting them to 
the charge of unfit persons. The example of a teacher in morals and 
in deportment, his looks, his words, the very image of his mind and 
heart, as well as his teachings, are stamped upou the young minds over 
whom he is placed, and neither time nor eternity can ever efface the im- 
pression. The responsibility which arises from the employment of a 
common school instructor cannot be over stated. 



75 



MANSFIELD. 

We have employed in our sixteen schools, during the year, thirty-one 
different teachers, and although most of them have taught in this town 
previously, yet but one single teacher has been employed in the same 
school through the year. This is partly attributable to the fact that male 
teachers are employed in winter and female in summer, and partly not, 
because six districts employed female teachers in the winter, and some 
others mijrht have done so with advantage. Five of the winter schools 
had the teachers of the previous winter, and two or three of the summer 
schools the teacher of the previous summer; all the rest changed every 
term or every other term. We have introduced seven fresh hands into 
our schools the past year, two males and five females; the remaining 
twenty -four were experienced resident teachers. Most of our teachers 
have done good service, and well deserve the confidence and approbation 
secured, while others had better relinquish teaching and seek some other 
calling. Our most noticeable failures are traceable, directly, to the fact 
that the teacher did not possess, or did not exercise, the ability to govern 
properly the school, and, so long as parents will not govern their chil- 
dren just so long the teacher must do it, or the object contemplated in 
the establishment of our common schools — the education of the chil- 
dren, — must be unattained. And then, again, we shall not secure good 
teachers in all our schools until our districts are willing to pay for good 
teachers, for while every other kind of labor gives better pay, and the 
veriest ignoramus, for the most menial service, commands a higher price 
than we pay our teachers, it will not be strange if enterprising young 
gentlemen and ladies should seek other fields of labor where, with far 
less responsibilities resting upon them, they may secure better remunera- 
tion. 

NEW FAIRFIELD. 

Taking our schools as a whole we think there has been an improve- 
ment the past year. The larger part of our teachers are expecting to 
make teaching a business for several years, — and such are our best teach- 
ers. We wish committees would close the door against those who only 
"keep " school for a term because they are out of business. Pupils, 
parents, and school visitors generally have occasion to rejoice when the 
term of service of such teachers expires. 



76 



OLD SAVHKOOK. 

We are happy to say that we are enjoying the labors of two Normal 
pupils, who do Credit to the institution of which they were members. 

POMFRET. 

Those whose duty it is to supply the schools with competent teachers 
should aim at a higher grade of qualifications. In their anxiety to pro- 
vide for the approaching sessions and relieve themselves of care they 
should not employ the first applicant, unless he gives evidence of pecul- 
] ar fitness for his work. Let us not be too slow to learn that the higher 
the culture of the teacher the greater the price we must pay for his servi- 
ces, and that we should not shrink from any cost that promises so rich a 
compensation. No district is so poor that it can afford to employ a poor 
teacher. We are bound by the most solemn and imperative obligations 
to sustain the good character of our common schools and to bring them 
up to the best possible standard of excellence. Make them attractive 
and desirable, make them a necessity for the acquirement of that culture 
which wins for its possessor the respect and confidence of society, and 
we shall give them only that generous support which they deserve. 

PRESTON. 

In regard to the character and qualifications of Teachers. It should 
be the earnest desire and endeavor of every parent in a school district, 
who has children to be educated, not only to secure a teacher competent 
to instruct his children, but also to procure one whose moral character, 
manners, and general deportment, are such as will at least not have a 
bad influence upon the scholar. A teacher ought to set such an exam- 
ple, both in manners, language and behavior, as a pupil may safely 
follow; for, aa ire remarked in our last report, pupils arc very apt to 
be more or less influenced by the manners, language and habits of a 
teacher. Rough, vulgar or profane language ought to be considered a 
disqualification in any teacher. Education ought always to produce a 
refining influence upon the character. Where it has not this effect, it 
is, to say the least, of very doubtful utility. But pupils will never get 
refinement from one who is coarse and vulgar. We do not say these 
things with any personal reference whatever — least of all in reference 
t" any teachers who have been employed in this town. But we 



77 

speak of tliem as important truths, which ought always to be kept in 
mind in engaging- teachers; and although it is generally left to the 
district committee to secure a teacher, yet the individual members of a 
district may exercise some influence in this matter, if they will. And 
it would be well for teachers as well as others to ponder these sugges- 
tions. In order to secure a teacher of this character, and competent in 
other respects, a fair compensation must be paid. Districts sometimes 
seek for a cheap teacher, and as a natural consequence, have almost 
invariably a cheap school. In some cases indeed, a district acting upon 
this principle may have a good school, but the fact is more generally 
the other way. Economy is very desirable and commendable in educa- 
tion, as in everything else, but there is a wide difference between 
economy and niggardliness. The latter is despicable anywhere, espe- 
cially in a matter of so much importance as the education of the young. 
Starve anything else, but never starve the immortal mind by being too 
niggardly to furnish, if able, the means requisite for its culture. It will 
amply repay all that is expended upon it. There is a thousand times 
more pleasure, if one duly considers it, in seeing a well-stored, well- 
furnished, well-disciplined mind, than, seeing a well-furnished or elegant 
looking house, or a finely cultivated farm. Better spend money upon 
the education of your children than invest it in stocks; it will 
eventually, in the majority of cases, pay a much better interest. It 
was never designed that our public funds should furnish the whole 
expense of educating our children. It was supposed that we should be 
able and willing, should esteem it a privilege, and find it a pleasure, to 
do a part. Our fathers did nobly, all that fathers could be expected to 
do, in setting apart our large school fund for this object, and 
prohibiting its alienation to any other purpose, yet they never 
thought this or any other public fund should do the whole. But peo- 
ple seem sometimes to suppose so. They seek in the employment of 
teachers to graduate their expenses so as not to have to pay a cent 
directly out of their own pockets. We do not by this mean to be 
understood that there should be extravagance in the wages paid to 
teachers ; it is not the amount of money that of itself secures a good 
teacher, but good teachers cannot be expected to be obtained without 
a fair, if not a liberal, compensation. Nor do we mean that enough has 
not been paid to those who have in some cases been employed. There 
doubtless has ; they were dear at any price. Some whom we have 
occasionally seen, it has been our sincere opinion, ought never to have 
been within the walls of a school-house as teachers; they had quite 
mistaken, or others had for them, their calling. " But where are you, 



78 

gentlemen school visitor.-, that you do not keep such unworthy individ- 
uals out of the school-house P" "We mean to do our dutv faithfully, but 
its performance sometime- is encom passed with many difficulties, for 
though we may be able to judge of the literary qualifications of teachers, 
yet we cannot, until after trial, tell what their ability in teaching and 
managing a school may be, and if we should sometimes err from this 
or any other cause, it should not be thought surpri-ing by those who 
are acquainted with human infirmity. 

ROXBURY. 

In the selection of a teacher, it may be comparatively easy for the 
committee to decide upon moral character and literary attainments, but 
with regard to a person's ability to teach, and of maintaining order in 
school, the examining board can have no safe criterion to guide them in 
their decision. They must, sometimes, permit the teacher to make the 
experiment, — and a costly experiment it too often proves, comprising 
not only a loss of time and money, but a far greater loss to the pupils, 
in the formation of habits of idleness which will require all the skill and 
energy of a good teacher to counteract. 

SALISBURY. 

One only, of our schools, has been taught by a teacher from the 
Normal school, — that one was the best in town. We need drilled 
teachers, not those who take up the profession merely for the want of 
something else to do. 

STOXIXGTOX. 

A good teacher is a sine qua non to a good school. And such a 
teacher is not easily found. Stili, they can be obtained. Mere book 
knowledge is but a part, and often the smallest part, of a good teacher's 
qualification. One of the first qualifications in a teacher is common 
sense, or a knowledge of human nature as develop d in children, a 
capability of adapting itself to those idiosyncr i>i c s of mind which ap- 
pear in ail schools. All children are not alike, nor will the same man- 
ner of treatment in a school always produce the same result. Unless 
the teacher can conform himself to those natural temperaments, or dis- 
positions of his scholars, he will become repugnant to many, and thus 
close up the only avenues to the child's development and progress. 



79 

Another requisition, and an important one too, is a competency to 
govern, or a gift of governing. The power to govern a school lies not 
in birch or hickory, but in the man himself. It shows itself in the look, 
the voice, the gesture, the whole person. It is not physical strength 
nor size, but in a quiet self-reliance, self-controling, power over another. 
And he who has it not, should never seek to govern a school. 

Apt to teach is another qualification, so important and indispensable 
that no person can teach without it. One may keep school but cannot 
teach without it. A simple hearing of recitations and reading and 
spelling, is not teaching school. Almost any one can do that. To 
awaken the power of the youthful mind to think, to reason, to self- 
reliance, to investigation, is the great object of the teacher. And yet a 
large portion of teachers seem never to have thought of it- A dull 
routine of memorizing and saying lessons, comprise the every-day work 
of many schools. Take books away from many who keep a school, 
and they are as weak as Samson shaven of his locks. The teacher 
who relies on books alone, is but a mere echo of somebody else. A 
successful teacher must ever be fruitful in expedients, versatile in 
thought and fertile in explanations. 

Real enthusiasm is essential to high success in teaching. As each day 
brings its own success or failure, there is great liability to despondency, 
if not despair. " The teacher operates on mind, whose moods are ever 
affected by causes and influences over which he has little or no control, 
dealing with passions easily excited, but with difficulty governed, and 
subject to unforeseen influences, the success of to-day may be more than 
overbalanced by the want of it to-morrow." 

" The constant oversight of conduct, the stretch of mind in devising 
methods of solving each child's difficulties and illustrating each different 
lesson ; the trial of sensibility and patience, with all the irritants and 
counter-irritants which the ingenuity, and deceitfulness, and petulance 
of thirty or sixty children and their parents can invent, give a tension 
to the faculties which few can bear without suffering a reaction. To 
counteract this, and keep up a healthy pulsation, and a cheerful, hope- 
ful spirit, there must be a youthful vivacity of feeling which few are 
capable of possessing." 

Another requisite is true refinement of diction and of manner. There 
are few positions w r here gentility, courtesy, and everything that goes to 
make the real gentleman and lady, is more needed than in teaching. 
If we do not wish our children to be boorish, clownish, vulgar, rude in 
speech and coarse in manner, we must keep the coarse, vulgar, "rough 



80 

and ready" teachers out of the school-room. The difference between a 
refined and uncouth teacher, is easily Been among the scholars. They 
are boisterous in their play, rude in their behavior, and low and vulgar 
in their exprearioDa. Manners outside a schoolroom often afford a true 
test of the teacher within. 

STRATFORD. 

Our schools show quite an improvement for the past year. The 
houses, with one exception, are in good condition, and under the man- 
agement of faithful and efficient teachers, and the schools are doing 
well. We think one reason for their snccess may be found in the fact 
that good teachers have been employed, and continued for successive 
terms in most of the districts. This plan has operated very favorably 
upon the schools, and is a great advance upon the old plan of changing 
teachers every terra. 

VERNON. 

We can, however, speak approvingly of all the teachers employed in 
our schools during the past year. Good progress has been made in all 
the schools. There has been, evidently, an earnest endeavor on the part 
of each one to perform the high and important duties of a teacher, 
faithfully and acceptably. There has been no one who has failed to 
succeed, agreeably to our earnest wishes and expectations. 

Few teachers have been employed in our schools during the whole year, 
only one continuing two terms in the same school ; and we would here 
make a few suggestions in regard to the employiug of teachers. Too 
great care cannot be used in this respect. It sometimes happens that 
the first candidate that presents himself or herself, is empl >yed, without 
due enquiry as to his or her qualifications. In another case, wages is 
the principal thing. A cheap teacher is desired. And often, in such 
cases, a cheap teacher is had. Sometimes we are satisfied with a candi- 
date so far as his literary attainments are concerned, but ue may be 
coarse and vulgar in his language or manners. This ought not so to 
be. A teacher should aim to elevate the pupils in every respect ; be 
devotional, kind, trusting, loving, neat and tidy, mindful of others' feel- 
ings, gentle and respectful, choice and correct in the use of language ; 
in fine, be to them a model of good language, of good manners, and of 
polite and gentlemanly conduct. And this matter should be looked to 
by the committee. We would urge more attention and care in the 
employment of teachers. It is truly surprising to witness the indiffer- 



81 

ence there often is in (his matter. In tho construction of a valuable 
machine, the best mechanics are selected, while a bungler gets no em- 
ployment; but often, the teacher of the common school, who is to 
mould and shape the destiny of immortal minds, is employed with but 
little inquiry into his or her competency. 

Another important matter, which is often overlooked in the employ- 
ment of teachers, is the talent for government. A good school cannot, 
be taught, unless a teacher possesses this indispensable qualification. 
Close inquiry should be made on this point. Our schools often would 
be excellent schools, were there not a want of this highly important 
requisite. "We plead that only those teachers be employed who, being 
well educated, possess sound common sense, decision and energy 
blended with kind and virtuous qualities. 

WALLINGFORD. 

Our teachers have been continued in the same school more than in 
some previous years, and the people are learning that it is best to keep 
a good teacher as long as possible. 

We are employing female teachers to a larger. extent than in former 
years, and we find that they succeed generally quite as well as male 
teachers. 

WESTBROOK. 

There is no advantage in employing the cheapest teachers that come 
into the market, for, usually, that which costs but little, is of little 
value, — or even should we by chance get a good teacher for a small 
compensation, he will continually feel that he is not receiving what is 
his due,. and we shall not be likely to retain him long. 

The employment of new and especially of inexperienced teachers, 
and of constantly changing them from term to term, which is caused in 
part by a desire to get teachers that are cheap, is operating very much 
to the disadvantage, of our schools. 

Ordinarily the longer a teacher can be retained in the same school, 
the better it is for the school. One is worth twice as much the second 
term, as during the first. Teaching is an art that cannot be acquired 
without practice. It is not every boy or girl who is of sufficient age, 
and who may happen to have a tolerable education, who is competent 
to manage a school. It is not every one who may have no easier way 
of earning a little money, during the winter or summer, than by taking 

6 



82 

a district school, who is capable of teaching our children. There is no 
economy in employing such, even though by some means they may be 
able to procure a certificate from the board of examiners. Teaching is 
a most responsible work, and should command the services of the very 
best persons that can be obtained. 

Our Normal schools are doing a good work in the way of qualifying 
teachers, and generally those who have enjoyed the advantages of a 
training in these schools, should have the preference. Indeed, it 
could be wished that all who intend to teach in our State, shoulgl spend 
one or more terms in our State Normal School, in qualifying themselves 
for their duties. 

WILLINGTON. 

We have to report one fact never before occurring in the history of 
our schools, viz., that no male teacher has been employed during any 
portion of the year, the districts having all employed females, summer 
and winter. We do not consider this at all prejudicial to the interests 
of our schools, for we are satisfied that a good female teacher usually 
secures the affections of her pupils to a greater extent than most male 
teachers, — thus rendering the task of governing a school much less 
difficult than otherwise, — but we are aware that a good teacher is a 
somewhat rare article. Owing to the extreme difficulty of procuring 
teachers, especially for the winter schools, we gave certificates to some 
with whose qualifications we were not entirely satisfied, though they 
seemed to meet the requirements of the law, — and though some did not 
quite come up to our mark, we believe the average condition of our 
schools equal to that of previous years. 

WINDHAM. 

The schools, with but few exceptions, have been very good, better, on 
the whol% than the previous year. The influence of the board, as far as 
possible, has been exerted in securing and retaining the best teachers, 
fully believing the best, at whatever cost, are far tl*e cheapest. Most 
of the teachers have appeared to feel the importance of their work, and 
have labored accordingly ; the fruits of which have been plainly seen in 
the general appearance of their pupils, and the marked proficiency 
made in tfie several studies. This we cannot say of every school; for 
some districts act upon the plan of obtaining the cheapest teachers, 
without regard to qualification. The bad effect of this is plainly seen 



83 

by us, when such schools are examined. We have labored to obviate 
this difficulty ; still, it is not in our power to hire such school teachers 
as we would like, but siraply,to examine them, and as we very well know 
that a poorly qualified class will be sent for examination, we frequently 
(yes, too often,) approbate them, though with great reluctance, knowing 
the failings and former practices of such districts. We earnestly desire 
that districts may attach more importance to securing the services of 
teachers who not only are well qualified to impart instruction, but who 
love their work, and who design to make teaching, not a temporary 
occupation, but a life work. We are happy to say that six or eight of 
our teachers are not only well qualified and love their work, but have 
had large experience — have made teaching a life profession, and have 
been retained in the same school for a succession of terms, and in some 
cases for years. Such schools have steadily advanced to higher attain- 
ments from term to term, and from year to year. 

WOODBURY. 

Among the hindrances to the successful prosecution of our schools, 
are irregular attendance, incompetent teachers, and the frequent change 
of teachers. We find our best schools to be those in which the same 
teachers are retained for successive terms. 

Our convictions are strengthening with each successive year, that by 
far the best teachers, other things being equal, are those who have 
received instruction at some Normal school. 



B. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 



The following courses of study are presented with a hope that they 
may be found useful to towns or districts establishing graded schools, or 
high schools, and as illustrating what is accomplished in such schools. 

The firat is a course of study recommended by the committee on 
schools of New Haven, for all grades below the high school. 

The second is an outline of the course adopted for the high school at 
New Britain, and the third is taken from the circular of the Hartford 
High School. 

NEW HAVEN. 

In order to maintain a uniform course of study in the public schools 
of New Haven, so clearly marked out that parents, teachers, and schol- 
ars may understand it, the School Committee recommend for trial the 
following scheme, which is intended for pupils of average ability, be- 
tween the ages of six and thirteen years. It will occupy some scholars, 
without doubt, a longer time, and some perhaps a less period. The 
Committee, whilst cautioning the teachers against pushing scholars for- 
ward so rapidly as to injure their health or their mental improvement, 
would at the same time recommend such thoroughness of instruction, 
and such constant reviews and examinations as will make it unnecessary 
to do over in any year the work of a previous one. 

1st year — Average age, 6-7. Reading and spelling, First Reader. Read num- 
bers to 100. Daily exercises in enunciation. Print on slate. 

2d year — Average age, 7-8. Reading and spelling, Second Reader. Write 
and read numbers to 1,000; the Roman numerals to 100; Addition table; oral 
instruction in Geography ; writing script hand on slate ; punctuation marks from 
cards. 

Zdyear — Average age, 8-9. Reading, Third Reader; Spelling Book, page 
52 ; Primary Arithmetic, to page GO ; the Roman notation finished ; Primary 
Geography, through the United States ; Writing on slate. 

4th year — Average age, 9-10. Reading Third and Fourth Reader; Spelling 
Book, page 75; Primary Arithmetic, finished; Primary Geography, finished ; 
Writing. 



85 

6th year— Average age, 10-11. Beading, Fourth Reader; Spelling Boole, page 
102; Arithmetic, the Ground Rules, Reduction, Definitions, and General Princi- 
ples; Intermediate Geography, to South America ; Writing; Composition. 

%th year — Average age, 11-12. Reading, Fifth Reader; Spelling Book, fin- 
ished ; Arithmetic, Common and Decimal Fractions, United States Money, Com- 
pound Numbers; Intermediate Geography, finished; Grammar, to Syntax; Wri 
ting ; Composition. 

*lthyear — Average age, 12-13. Reading, Fifth Reader ; Spelling Book, .re- 
viewed ; Arithmetic, Percentage, Ratio, Pr ^portion, Alligation ; Geography 
reviewed; Grammar, finished ; History; Writing or Bookkeeping ; Composition. 

The High School. — Candidates for admission to the High School must pass a 
satisfactory examination in Spelling, Reading, Writing, English Grammar, Geog- 
raphy, Arithmetic, and the History of the United States. 

Latin Preparatory Class. — Pupils, where parents desige to give them a classi- 
cal education, may be admitted to the Latin Preparatory Class, whenever they 
have thoroughly mastered the ground rules of Arithmetic, and made correspond- 
ing progress in their other studies ;— but no girls shall be admitted, except there 
are unoccupied seats not needed by boys. 

Near the close of the school year, the Principals shall give notice to such pupils 
as have made the requisite progress, that they can be admitted to the Latin 
Class. 

NEW BRITAIN. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

First Year. — 1st Term — Arithmetic, Grammar, and History. 
2c? Term — Arithmetic, Grammar, and History. 
3c? Term— Arithmetic, Physiology, and Zoology. 

Second Year. — 1st Term — Algebra, Natural Philosophy, and Botany. 
2c? Term — Algebra, Natural Philosophy, and Rhetoric. 
3c? Term — Algebra, Physical Geography, and Chemistry. 

Third Year. — 1st Term — Geometry, Mental Philosophy, and Geology. 

2c? Term — Geometry, Mental Philosophy, and Astronomy. 

3c? Term— Geometry, Moral Philosophy, and Political Economy. 

Pupils preparing for college or taking a classical course will have Mathematics, 
as above, and Latin and Greek in place of other studies. 

Reading, Spalling, Writing, Drawing, Composition, and Declamation through 
the course. 

Bookkeeping, French, and German are optional. 



86 



HARTFORD. 
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT— FIVE YEARS. 

Fifth Class. 

Summer Term. — Arithmetic, English Grammar, Zoology. 
Fall Term. — Arithmetic, English Exercises, Zoology or Latin. 
Winter Term. — Book Keeping, History, Physiology or Latin. 

Fourth Class. 

Summer Term.— Algebra, History, Botany or Latin. 

Fall Term. — Algebra, History, Botany, French, German, Latin or Greek. 
Winter Term. — Algebra, Flistory, Physical Geography, French, German, Latin 
or Greek. • 

Middle Class. 

Summer Term. — Geometry, Natural Philosophy, Physical Geography, French, 
German, Latin or Greek. 

Fall Term. — Geometry, Natural Philosophy, English Grammar, higher, 
French, German, Latin or Greek. 

Winter Term. — Geometry, Geology, Rhetoric, French, German, Latin or 
Greek. 

Junior Class. 

Summer Term. — Trigonometry, Chemistry, English Language and Literature, 
Constitution of United States and of Connecticut, Latin or Greek. 

Fall Term. — Chemistry, English Language and Literature, Intellectual Philoso- 
phy, Latin or Greek. 

Winter Term. — Astronomy, Intellectual and Moral Philosophy, Latin or 
Greek. 

Senior Class. 

Summer Term. — Butler's Analogy, Mathematical Astronomy, History of Civili- 
zation, Surveying , Navigation, Conic Sections. 

Fall Term. — Political Economy, History of Civilization, Application of Sci- 
ence to Art. 

Winter Term. — Reviews. 

There is instruction in Penmanship and Drawing throughout the Course. 
The Studies in Italics arc optional. 



87 
CLASSICAL DEPARTMENT. 

First Year. 

Fall Term. — Andrews' and Stoddard's Latin Grammar, Whiton's Handbook of 
Latin Exercises. 

"Winter Term. — Andrews' and Stoddard's Latin Grammar, Andrews' Latin 
Reader, or Andrews' Viri Romae, Whiton's Handbook of Latin Exercises. 

Summer Term. — Latin Reader or Viri Romas, Whiton's Handbook. 

Second Tear. 

Fall Term. — Andrews' Ctesar, Whiton's Handbook, Hadley's Greek Gram- 
mar. 

Winter Term. — Ctesar, Arnold's Latin Prose Composition, continued the re- 
mainder of the course, Hadley's Grammar, Xenophon's Anabasis, Exercises in 
Greek Accentuation, continued through the year. 

Summer Term. — Cicero's Orations, Xenophon's Anabasis. 

Tliird Year. 

Fall Term. — Cicero's Orations, Xenophon's Anabasis, Ancient Geography and 
History, continued through the year. 
Winter Term. — Cicero's Orations, Xenophon's Anabasis. 
Summer Term.— Virgil's iEneid, Xenophon's Anabasis. 

Fourth Year. 

Fall Term. — Virgil's iEueid, Xenophon's Anabasis, Arnold's Greek Prose 
Composition, continued through the year, Ancient Mythology and Antiquities, 
continued through the year. 

"Winter Term. — Virgil's Bucolics and Georgics, Sallust, Homer's Odyssey. 

Summer Term. — Homer's Odyssey, Review of Studies. 



HIGH SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 

Sec. 1. Candidates for admission to the High School must be twelve years old, 
must be members of the First Class of the First Department of the District 
School, must pass a satisfactory examination in Reading, Orthography, Penman- 
ship, Arithmetic, Geography, Grammar, and the History of the United States, 
and must furnish satisfactory evidence of good moral character. 



88 

Sec. 2. Tho examination of candidates for the High School shall be held at a 
time appointed during tho month next preceding the spring vacation. It shall 
be conducted by the principal and acting visitor or visitors. Each performance 
shall be examined by the principal and acting visitor or visitors, and no candi- 
date shall be admitted unless the principal, and at least one acting visitor, shall 
concur in such a decision. The principals of the District Schools shall be invi- 
ted to be present during the examination of the results. 

Seo. 7. Candidates for admission to the High School, residing outside the city 
of Hartford, may be admitted on a private examination, which shafl be satisfac- 
tory to the principal and acting visitor or visitors.* 

Sec 9. The acting visitor or visitors shall have discretionarj' power to admit 
to the High School applicants of advanced age, who are unable to attend school 
during the whole year, and who desire to pursue one or more branches, with a 
view of fitting themselves for some specific employment; provided that such 
branches are taught in the school, and that such applicants are qualified to enter 
classes already existing. 

* Non-resident pupils are charged for tuition at the rate of So cents per week. 



c. 

SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL, YALE COLLEGE. 



Corporation. 
The President and Fellows of Yale College. 

Visitors on the part of the State of Connecticut. 

The Governor, the Lieutenant Governor, the three senior Senators, 
and the Superintendent of Common Schools. 

Instructors. 

William A. Norton, M.A., Civil Engineering and Mathematics. 

James D. Dana, LL.D., Geology and Mineralogy. 

Benjamin Silliman, Jr., M.D., General and Applied Chemistry. 

Rev. Chester S. Lyman, M.A., Industrial Mechanics and Physics. 

Wm. D. Whitney, Ph.D., Modern Languages. 

George J. Brush, M.A., Mineralogy and Metallurgy. 

Daniel C. Gilman, M.A', Physical Geography. 

Samuel W. Johnson, M. A., Analytical and Agricultural Chemistry. 

Wm. H. Brewer, M.A., Agriculture. 

Daniel C. Eaton, M.A., Botany. 

Addison E. Verrill, B.S., Zoology. 

Louis Bail, Drawing and Designing. 

preliminary statement. 

This school was commenced in 1847 as the Yale Analytical Labora- 
tory, and much of its early success was due to the efforts of the late 
John P. Norton, Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. In 1860 the re- 
sources of the school were enlarged by the munificence of Joseph E. 



90 

Sheffield, Esq., of New Haven, who gave a commodious building and a 
large fund for the maintenance of the institution. Other important ad- 
ditions to its funds have at different times been received. 

In 18G3, an Act of the Connecticut Legislature appropriated to this 
institution the proceeds of certain public lands assigned to this State by 
the National Congress The requirements of the State in respect to the 
applicants for free tuition are subsequently stated. 

COMPLETE COURSES OF STUDY. 

The complete course of study in this institution extends through three 
years, terminating, after a satisfactory examination, in the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy, conferred by the Corporation of Yale College. 

The candidate for admission must be at least sixteen years of age, 
must present satisfactory testimonials of character, and must pass an ex- 
amination in Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Plane Trigonometry, the 
Elements of Natural Philosophy, English Grammar, and Geography. 

The first year of instruction will be the same for all who take a com- 
plete course, and will include tuition in Mathematics, Physics, Chemis- 
try, Botany, Drawing, and Modern Languages. 

At the end of the first year the student will select which of several 
special courses he will pursue. Courses are now arranged in Chemistry 
and Natural Science, and in Engineering and Mechanics ; and one in 
Agriculture will be announced during the present year. Besides these, 
there is a general course, intended to be scientific rather than literary, 
preparatory to higher special studies. 

PARTIAL COURSES. 

Students are admitted to partial courses of study for a longer or 
shorter period, by arrangement with the instructors in the departments 
of science to which they desire to direct their attention. It is preferred 
to receive no pupils for a period of less than a year. 

PRACTICAL LECTURES. 

As soon as the necessary arrangements can be made, special courses of 
lectures in various branches of practical science will be given by the 
instructors in the school. These lectures will be designed for the special 



91 

benefit of those who are now engaged in industrial occupations, and will 
continue for a brief period only in the winter months. 

DEGREES. 

1. The degree of Bachelor of Philosophy will be conferred on those 
who have passed through either of the complete courses. 
. 2. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy will be conferred on Bache- 
lors of Arts or Philosophy who pursue for two years an advanced course 
of study, and pass the required examination. 

3. The degree of Civil Engineer will be conferred on persons who 
have successfully pursued a higher course in Engineering. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The first term of the collegiate year commences September 15th, and 
continues fourteen weeks; the second begins January 5th, and continues 
fourteen weeks; the third commences May 3d, and continues twelve 
weeks. The first term is followed by a vacation of two weeks, the sec- 
ond by one of three weeks, and the third by one of seven weeks. 

APPOINTMENT OF STATE STUDENTS. 

Announcement of the Appointing Board. 

I. By appropriating to the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale College 
the income of certain funds derived from the sale of United States lands, 
the State of Connecticut has provided for the gratuitous instruction of 
a number of pupils in the various departments of the school. 

II. The persons to receive this free tuition are to be selected from the 
candidates who offer themselves, by an Appointing Board, consisting of 
the Governor, Lieutenant Governor, the three senior Senators, the Su- 
perintendent of Common Schools, and the Secretary of the Sheffield 
Scientific School. t 

III. This privilege of free instruction must be assigned, in accordance 
with the following principles, viz. : 

1. The candidates for appointment must be citizens of this State. 

2. Preference will be given to such as are " fitting themselves for 
agricultural and mechanical, or manufacturing occupations, who are or 



92 

shall become orphans through the death of a parent in the naval or mili- 
tary service of the United States, and next to them to such as are most 
in need of pecuniary assistance." 

3. The appointments must bo distributed, as far as practicable, among 
the several counties of the State, in proportion to their population. 

IV. Candidates nominated by the Appointing Board are to be admit- 
ted to the school " upon the same terms, and are to be subject to the 
same rule? and discipline as the other pupils of the school, with the sin- 
gle exception that they shall not pay anything for their instruction. 

V. Persons desiring to avail themselves of the bounty of the State 
may apply, in writing, previous to the meeting of the Board, to the 
Secretary, who will furnish a printed form of application, to be filled up 
by each candidate, and will present all applications to the Board for 
their decision. 

Applications should be directed to 

GEO J. BRUSH, New Haven-, 

Secretary of the Appointing Board. 



D. 
SCHOOL LIBRARIES, 



BLANK FORMS OF LIBRARY CERTIFICATE. 

form of certificate for first installment. 

(Name or Town and Date.) 
To the Superintendent of Common Schools: 

This is to certify that District has 

raised for the purchase of books for a School Library, 

By subscription, - - - - $ 

By taxation, ------ 



Amount, ------$ 

In accordance with the provisions of the School law, you are re- 
quested to forward your order to the State Treasurer for the sum of 
ten dollars, to be expended in like manner. 

(Signed, The Committee, or the Chairman thereof.) 

form of certificate for second installment. 

(Name of Town and Date.) 
To the Superintendent of Common Schools : 

This is to certify, that the first installment of ten dollars, received 
by School District from the State Treasury, for tho pur- 

chase of a School Library, was duly expended for books, approved by 
the School Visitors of this town. 

An additional sum of [at least five) dollars has been raised (hy sub- 
scription or taxation) for a similar purpose this year, and you are 
requested to forward your order to the State Treasurer for the sum of 
five dollars, to be expended in like manner. 

(Stoned by the Committee or ) ~ c . , ys. , . . 

+u sm - .i c\ r Committee of said District, 

the Chairman thereof,) ) 

The form for the third and future installments should be similar, ex- 
cept instead of " first installments of ten dollars," should read "second," 
or "third," tfec, "installment of five dollars." 

The law requires that the books selected shall be approved by the 
Board of Visitors for each town. 



E. 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 



ADMISSION OF PUPILS. 

Pupils are admitted only at the beginning of a term, and are ex- 
pected to remain through an entire term, unless excused to fill vacancies, 
as teachers, occurring before its close. 

Any person may apply to the school visitors of any town for admis- 
sion to the school. 

FORM OF APPLICATION. 

[Date.] 
To the School VisitDrs of I hereby respectfully 

signify my desire to procure a Certificate of Recommendation for ad- 
mission to the State Normal School. 

And I hereby declare that my object in seeking admission to the 
School, is to qualify myself for the employment of a Common School 
Teacher, and that it is my intention to engage in that employment in 
this State. 

[Signature.] 
The School Visitors are authorized to grant a Certificate of Admission 
to the School, to any person who shall have been found, on examination 
by them, possessed of the qualifications necessary. 

CERTIFICATE OF RECOMMENDATION. 

The following is the form of the Certificate which should be given 
by School Visitors to the candidates whom they recommend for admis- 
sion. 

[Date.] 

This is to certify, that 
has been examined by the School Visitors of 

and approved as possessed of the qualifications required of teachers of 
Common Schools in this State, and that he [or she] is hereby recom- 
mended by the said Visitors to the Trustees of the State Normal School, 
as a suitable person, by his [or her] age, character, talents and attain- 
ments, to be received as a pupil in that Institution. 

[Signed by the Chairman or Acting Visitor.] 



95 

School Visitors and friends of education are requested to explain^tho 
objects of the School, and present its advantages to those persons who 
may be benefited by it, and in their recommendations to the school, 
to select candidates, whose character and attainments will enable them 
to obtain the full advantages of this Institution, and to become useful 
teachers in the schools of the State. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

There are three Terms in each year. The first, or Autumn Term, 
commences on the third Tuesday of September, and continues till 
the last school-day before the 25th of December. 

The second, or Winter Term, commences on the second day of 
January, and continues till the last Thursday in March. 

The third, or Spring Term, commences on the third Tuesday in 
April, and continues till the last Thursday but two in July. 

TEACHERS FOR COMMON SCHOOLS. 

School Committees desiring to secure competent teachers, and who 
wish to employ those trained in the Normal School, are requested to 
address the principal, stating the terms to be offered and the qualifica- 
tions required. No pains will be spared to secure for any post designa- 
ted a competent teacher. 

As applications for teachers are numerous in Spring or Autumn, it is 
desirable that such applications be made when convenient, sometime 
before the teacher is needed. 

The Board of Trustees or the Faculty of the School cannot be held 
responsible for the success of those teachers who are employed upon 
he mere representation that they have been Normal pupils. 



F- 

STATISTICAL TABLES. 



The following statistical tables have been made up from the returns 
of School Visitors. They present the more important facts relating to 
common schools, so far as they can be put in tabular form. In a few 
cases the returns were incomplete, and the spaces have been left blank. 

TABLE I. 

This table gives the number of districts and of schools in each town, 
the average length of winter and summer schools, the number of pupils 
registered each term, and the average attendance. 

TABLE II. 

This table gives the number of pupils in each of the common studies; 
the number of male, and the number of female teachers, and the ave- 
rage wages of each class. 

TABLE III. 

This table is designed to show the degree of permanency in teaching 
attained; the condition of school-houses and yards; the number of 
graded schools, and the number of schools supplied with apparatus, 
maps and library. 

TABLE IV. 

This table gives the amount of money received from the school fund, 
town deposit fund, town school tax, district tax, tuition, and from other 
sources, and the amount expended for different school purposes. 



97 



TABLE I.-IIAKTFORD COUNTY. 









m 


GO 

'o 


1 




C 




c 




CO 










to 


CO 






to 


Fh 


9 


CD 


3 





£ 






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M 

GO 


s 


CO 


£ 


"3 


£ 

3 
at 




S 






O 

-C 
CO 


CO 

a 


a 

s 


3 


£ 

3 


a 


£ 

3 


► 


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3 

CO 






CO 


'£ 


3 


is 


CO 




CO 


3 


a 


a 


3 






r 


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C 


c 


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to 


CO 


00 


TOWNS. 




a 
I 


CO* 

00 


O 

GO 
CD 


T3 
CO 

<1> 


9 

to 


T3 



to 


to 

eo 



,0. 

Cm 


O 

X> 


'Sd 


"So 






O 


9 


CO 


GO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


. O 


O 





O 




to 


u 
O 


* 


* 


'So 


'Sd 
eo 


"So 

00 


'So 

CO 


to 


CO 

CO 





CO 






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■a 


3 




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M 
to 
>> 

O 


. 1* 
"1 


Fh 

CO 

IS • 


a 

c8 

3 


3 
ca 

3 


3 

a 

3 


3 

03 

3 




^3 




Cm 

cm 

O 


to 


3 

JO 


,0 

«*h 

O 


c 


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"3d 

c*h 

O 


a* 

■+J 
-t-3 

e3 


a> 

53 


cS 


CO 

-M 

«3 




s-l 

CO 


co 









m 

to 


u 
to 


00 


a) 


<D 

to 


to 

to 


co 




X> 


X> 


e 


eg 


-Q 


X* 


x> 


pQ 


«J 


C3 


=5 


CS 




s 


£ 


o> 


eo 


£ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


s 


km 

to 


CO 


CO 




3 


3 


> 


> 


3 


3 


3 


3 


> 


> 


^ 


> 




fc 


IS 


«1 


«4 


fe 


fc 


^ 


£ 


-*j 


< 


•<! 


<5 


Hartford, 


10 


19 


20 


19 


2040 


1982 


1985 


2025 


1352 


1277 


1294 


1208 


Avon, 


6 


6 


16 


16 


101 


68 


71 


74 


72 


52 


50 


54 


Berlin, 


9 


9 


19 


13 


224 


198 


170 


164 


158 


136 


92 


121 


Bloomfield, . . . 


9 


9 


15 


16 


125 


83 


81 


90 


92 


66 


66 


75 


Bristol, 


13 


16 


19 


16 


280 


271 


229 


278 


199 


151 


152 


193 


Burlington,. .. . 


9 


9 


15 


15 


128 


132 


103 


129 


92 


86 


71 


101 


Canton, 


9 


8 


15 


19 


282 


261 


229 


273 


199 


190 


142 


165 


East Hartford,. 


10 


12 


17 


18 


253 


220 


204 


220 


205 


170 


153 


179 


East Granby,. . 


6 


6 


16 


17 


73 


54 


48 


69 


62 


43 


40 


64 


East Windsor,. 


12 


12 


16 


15 


246 


213 


200 


219 


217 


163 


143 


156 


Enfield 


14 


26 


17 


15 


622 


503 


553 


569 


452 


369 


347 


390 


Farmiugton,. . . 


11 


11 


18 


17 


352 


286 


276 


278 


253 


240 


238 


225 


Glastenbury,.. . 


17 


17 


17 


14 


283 


253 


196 


285 


225 


202 


139 


211 


Granby, 


10 


10 


15 


16 


164 


143 


121 


152 


124 


97 


63 


113 


Hartland, 


10 


9 


14 


16 


94 


70 


60 


70 


76 


56 


40 


53 


Manchester,... . 


9 


9 


18 


17 


281 


251 


220 


247 


200 


167 


154 


175 


Marlborough, . . 


4 


4 


15 


If 


38 


44 


34 


43 


27 


24 


20 


28 


New Britain,. . 


6 


9 


17 


17 


528 


486 


568 


545 


395 


373 


441 


430 


Rocky Hill,.... 


4 


5 


20 


18 


88 


80 


51 


81 


56 


47 


22 


48 


Simsbury, 


13 


13 


16 


17 


232 


208 


194 


192 


158 


144 


113 


138 


South Windsor, 


10 


10 


16 


13 


149 


126 


94 


134 


119 


106 


71 


100 


Southington,. . . 


11 


11 


18 


17 


307 


278 


276 


296 


211 


178 


188 


196 


Suffield, 


11 


14 


17 


17 


369 


295 


260 


278 


287 


215 


199 


211 


West Hartford, 


7 


7 


16 


14 


127 


91 


91 


90 


97 


72 


74 


68 


Wethersfield,. . 


10 


10 


16 


18 


183 


158 


112 


148 


119 


100 


76 


100 


Windsor, 


10 


10 


16 


18 


220 


154 


156 


159 


160 


117 


110 


117 


Windsor Locks, 


1 


5 


14 


11 


15*' 


130 


140 


135 


100 


75 


85 


92 



98 



NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 



New Haven,. . . 
Fair Haven,. . . 
Westville, 

Bran ford 

Bethany, 

Cheshire, 

Derby, 

East Haven,. . . 

Guilford 

Hamden, 

Madison, 

Meriden, 

Middlebury,.. . . 

Milford, 

Naugatuek,. .. . 
North Branford 
North Haven,. . 
Orange,. . . ... 

Oxford, 

Prospect 

Seymour 

Southbury 

WallingfoFd,... 
Waterbury, .. . . 
Woodbridge, . . 
"VVolcott 



8 


8 


1.-, 


11 


13 


12 


13 


13 


13 


12 


5 


5 


12 


12 


6 


10 


7 


7 


7 


7 


7 


8 


13 


12 


6 


5 


r, 


6 


'.< 


10 


In 


10 


12 


SO 


D 


4 


6 


6 



21 
24 
29 
18 
15 
16 
is 
20 
17 
is 
17 
19 
16 
l.; 
16 
16 
18 
l.; 

is 
15 

•21 
20 
16 
26 
h; 
18 



o 

£> 
<*- 
O 

S3 

^> 
E 



21 2460 2671 

19 

18 

19 

19 

18 

19 

16 

15 

17 

IT 

l.; 
20 
IS 
19 
16 
16 
19 160 179 



198 


140 


103 


87 


190 


169 


70 


69 


212 


145 


619 


563 


185 


130 


231 


149 


201 


165 



4SS 398 

198 168 

225 219 



81 

139 



120 
65 



21 102 

20 160 

18 6. Vi 

20 75 

17 63 



94 

39 
121 
150 
178 

1151 

48 
4''. 



2 



2460 2671 

184 162 

91 88 

156| 169 



36 


69 


165 


173 


540 


536 


144 


203 


144 


150 


169 


195 


122 


162 


434 


448 


36 


65 


167 


j 7-1 


185 


233 


71 


102 


Mr, 


107 


131 


119 


92 


98 


47 


40 


MM 


169 


130 


155 


162 


231 


625 


1122 


44 


63 


38 


37 



o 



e 



1794 1876 

182 108 

62 5S 

140 189 

49 3 'J 

145 82 

431 391 

136 107 

175 102 

144 120 

150 123 

B14 866 

48 37 

150 180 

160 158 



581 

86| 

129 

96 

47 

78 

120 

156 

400 

65 

39 



64 
64 
76 
65 

27 
103 
140 
121 
865 
42 
26 



1791 

137 

61 

100 

21 

113 

345 

116 

94 

120 

87 

303 

25 

116 

134 

43 

93 

96 

51 

31 

73 

100 

98 

300 

5' 

19| 



1896 

119 

63 

119 

45 

114 

352 

167 

103 

132 

127 

298 

41 

129 

158 

75 

82 

91 

68 

32 

129 

120 

135 

638 

36 

27 



99 



NEW LONDON COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 



New London, - . . 

Bozrah, 

Colchester,. . . . 
East Lyme,.. . . 

Franklin, 

Griswold, 

Gioton 

Lebanon, 

Ledyard, 

Lisbon, 

Lyme, 

Montville, 

Norwich 

Norwich Center 
Nor. W.Chelsea, 
Norwich Town, 
No. Stonington, 

Old Lyme, 

Prestou, 

Salem, 

Sprague, 

Stonington, . . . 
Waterford, 







■ 






o 






o 






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o 
















o 

o 


OS 




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c 




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00 


(* 




a 








o 




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B 


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o 


Q> 




F* 


* 












a 




o 










-»3 


^5 






2 




«o 


to 


Cm 


u-> 


co 


O 


O 


1—1 


U 






X> 


rC 


03 


B 


a 


<U 


3 


3 


t* 


fc 


24 


<3 

22 


7 


7 


7 


18 


14 


17 


17 


9 


9 


18 


8 


8 


18 


14 


15 


7 


11 


. 10 


22 


16 


16 


17 


14 


14 


17 


7 


7 


17 


7 


7 


17 


13 


13 


17 


9 


20 


22 


1 


17 


28 


1 


3 


14 


1 


3 


21 


15 


15 


16 


8 


8 


16 


12 


13 


18 


8 


8 


19 


4 


6 


17 


17 


28 


22 


11 


11 


19 



794 
124 
336 
203 
108 
279 
440 
233 
185 

24 
111 
230 
577 
424 
273 

76 
201 
143 
226 

96 
191 
583 
270 



850 
112 
302 
153 

73 
215 
414 
178 
168 

21 

98 
200 
510 
435 
226 

56 
193 
130 
221 

46 
123 
474 
252 



731 7i 

83 103 

237 293 

131 137 

58 61 

137 178 

42L 419 



129 

91 

13 

81 

195 

484 

•423 

264 

82 

115 
94 
150 
128; 
111 
451 
174 



158 
136 

17 

80 
220 
467 
432 
214 

56 
163 
122 
192 

80 
109 
424 
212 









t-, 


<v 






c 


0) 


C 


1 


c 


* 


p 


£ 


.2 


# fl 


a 


03 


SO 


03 


O 


O 


*5d 


«»h 


«m 


t, , 




O 


o 


09 


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O 




a 


a 


a 




a 


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to 


es 


es 




w 


f-> 




<D 


09 


a> 


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> 


> 


< 


< 


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558 


572 


500 


84 


71 


46 


270 


235 


200 


137 


99 


87 


67 


64 


49 


173 


132 


79 


401 


286 


302 


160 


109 


80 


124 


124 


71 


20 


14 


10 


75 


73 


57 


181 


165 


144 


398 


318 


344 


380 


373 


348 


114 


158 


114 


67 


36 


53 


144 


126 


80 


98 


91 


61 


151 


142 


102 


64 


•48 


40 


97 


82 


90 


407 


339 


235 


188 


157 


105 



509 
75 

255 

84 

50 

119 

290 

108 

101 

15 

67 

172 

340 

329 

130 

40 

100 

71 

144 

40 

68 

305 

121 



100 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 







CD 

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o 

1 


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o 

rd 

o 

CO 

u 

CD 

a 


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c 

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V 
CD 

t- 

cp 

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3 

c 


£ 
£ 
p 

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u 

CD 

a 
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CD 

a 
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co 


ti 

CD 

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u 

CD 

E 
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s 

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CD 

a 
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■ 

5 
a 






a 


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d 


# d 


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^d 












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CO 




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of 


~ 


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>. 


>> 


^ 


11 


TOWNS. 




1 

<d 




9 
CD 


s 

cp 


CD 


CD 

- 


CD 

u 

CD 


% 

(4-1 


• — 


"So 


'to 

5m 




m 


fa 

o 


G 


: 


CO 

o 


CO 
CD 


"So 

CD 


CO 

'£b 

CD 


o 

CD 
CD 


z 

CD 
O 


o 
1 

cv 


o 

CD 
CD 




"o 


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fa 


fa 


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fa 


d 


= 


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- 




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3 
p. 


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G 


fcC 

a 


if. 

O 
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CO 

O 
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CO 

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CO 

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S 

d 

CD 

49 


1 

d 

45 


e8 

CD 


a 
a 

CD 




u* 


<** 


CD 


JS 


«4_, 


Hh 


«*- 


«4-l 


4B 


■*J 




4* 




o 


c 


1—1 




o 


9 


o 


o 


c3 


c3 


C 


a 




S 


CD 


CD 

bO 


bo 


fa 


fa 


fa 

CD 


fa 

CD 


CD 

tc 


CD 

to 


CD 

tr. 


CD 

to 




,0 


^3 


C5 


.-: 


X 


X> 


x> 


-o 


a 


03 


■ 


2 

CD 




a 


S 


■» 


cd 


s 


S 


B 


a 


a 

CD 


CD 






p 


P 


► 


P 


P 


3 


p 




> 


> 


> 


> 




fe 


£ 


^ 


< 


fc 


fc 


£ 


I 


<H 


< 


< 


<3 


Fairfield,.*. . . . 


17 


17 


18 


18 


434 


379 


317 


388 


315 


256 


194 


275 


Danbury, 


13 


13 


21 


22 


545 


469 


510 


418 


442 


303 


355 


27! 


Bethel, 


h 


5 


22 


23 


143 


91 


98 


101 


98 


59 


76 


6€ 


Bridgeport 


10 


10 


24 


20 


783 


788 


763 


803 


598 


540 


545 


577 


Brookfield, .... 


9 


8 


18 


21 


109 


99 


72 


89 


67 


59 


47 


68 


Darien, ....... 


4 


4 


22 


23 


17-2 


116 


145 


136 


102 


64 


72 


78 


Easton, 


8 


8 


20 


18 


131 


101 


83 


95 


70 


58 


38 


47 


Greenwich, 


21 


21 


19 


20 


617 


451 


457 


507 


292 


244 


294 


312 


Huntington, . . 


12 


11 


17 


17 


110 


120 


110 


110 


to 




60 


80 


Monroe, 


1 


7 


19 


20 


111 


90 


89 


108 


74 


57 


56 


70 


New Canaan,. . 


11 


11 


23 


•2t) 


26] 


161 






171 


99 


131 


143 


New Fairfield,. 


7 


7 


19 


21 


101 


60 


89 


91 


66 


41 


52 


50 


Newtown 


20 


20 


22 


23 


868 


305 


265 


307 


257 


209 




203 


Norwalk, 


12 


12 


20 


21 


661 


176 


619 


558 


535 


372 




412 


Redding 


10 


10 


18 


17 


181 


116 


B2 128 


87 


74 


59 


86 


Ridgefield, .... 


15 


14 


20 


20 


23ii 


Ms 191| 174 


143 


93 


93 


97 


Sherman, 


6 


6 


17 


20 


92 


65 75 74 


61 


37 


51 


48 


Stamford, 


15 


15 


20 


20 




•123 483! 475 


326 


24S 




820 


Stratford, 


^> 


8 


21 


2< 


L56 


146 111 181 


125 


109 


7 2 


110 


Trumbull, 


7 


G 


20 


24 


90 


8-1 B0 '■'-■ 


10 


68 


55 


75 


Weston, 


7 


7 


17 


18 


93 


76 7'.' VI 


58 


441 


65 


72 


Westport, 


10 


10 


• 20 


2i 


27'.' 


21 5| 212 221 


196 


165 


i:,:; 


169 


Wilton, 


1C 


9 


20 


22 


201 


182| 189] 193 


143 


91 


104 


118 



101 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 









00* 


o 
o 

-3 

GO 


o 

CO 




CD 




M 

CD 


u 

CD 


CD 

a 


c 

CD 


u 

CD 

a 
a 

3 

OS 

.2 






'o 
o 

00 


cd 
■*-> 


CD 

£ 

a 

CO 


3 


a 
a 

CO 


CD 

3 


a 
a 

3 

00 


3 

.a 


a 

3 

CO 

3 




TOWNS. 




3 
O 

a 

E 


Cm 
O 

OtT 


O 
CO 


.5 

cd 

S-C 


# 3 
CD 


# 3 

CD 


.s 

CD 

M 


00 

O 


CO 

o 


m 

'5c 


CD 

'5b 




GO 


o 
o 

u 

o 


cd 

CD 


CD 
1)0 

'5b 


CD 
CO 

'So 


CD 
CO 

'5b 


CD 
00 

'5b 


O 

CD 


CD 


o 

CD 


o 

CD 








s 


CJ 


cd 


o> 


CD 


CD 




CD 


CD 


CD 




^O 


o 












s- 


3 


3 


3 


3 




';-i 


r3 




„ 


CO 


00 


00 


00 


OS 


03 


03 


3 




-fc3 


JO 


J2 


£ 


t>> 


>> 


r— i 




■73 


^ 


"d 


"3 




00 


3 






o 


O 






3 


3 


3 


3 




'^5 


p. 


"So 




^2 


rO 


bD 


W) 


CD 
■43 


CD 


CD 

■*> 


OJ 
43 




O 


o 


CD 


CD 


o 


Cm 

o 


O 


*o 


-M 

e3 




S3 


18 




td 


u 


cd 


CD 


J_ 


M 


t. 


M 


CD 


CD 


CD 


0J 




o> 


<u 


bO 


CU. 


CD 


o> 


CD 


CD 


fee 


1° 


bO 


bO 




,-Q 


,o 


e3 


e3 


rT> 


rO 


,£> 


^ 


03 


03 


03 




a 


£ 


a> 


CD 


s 


B 


£ 


a 


S-c 

CD 


CD 


CD 


u 

CD 




3 


3 


> 


> 


3 


3 


3 


3 


> 


r> 


> 


► 




21 


la 

20 


16 


< 
1 


8 291 


fe 


fe 


Sz" 


< 

1 227 


<1 
199 


< 


< 


Litchfield, 


286 


20 


3 23 


155 


165 


Barkhamsted, . 


10 


11 


15 


1 


6 137 


122 


9 


1 12 


4 76 


71 


61 


69 


Bethlem, 


8 


8 


14 


1 


8 86 


53 


5 


9 6 


1 65 


41 


40 


40 


Bridgewater, . . 


5 


6 


16 


2 


2 111 


103 


9 


2 10 


8 69 


56 


63 


71 


Canaan, 


10 


9 


14 


1 


8 152 


103 


13 


2 11 


5 110 


73 


87 


84 


Colebrook,. . . . 


10 


10 


14 


1 


6 148 


120 


10 


3 12 


5 127 


130 


81 


94 


Cornwall, 


17 


17 


15 


1 


8 220 


200 


12 


2f 


160 


150 


120 


130 


Goshen,* 


13 


12 


15 


1 


8 163 


127 


10 


8 12 


7 98 


84 


84 


96 


Harwinton,. . . . 


12 


12 


15 


1 


5 122 


98 


8 


4 9 


8 87 


71 


69 


89 


Kent, 


13 


13 


16 


2 


2 197 


182 


15 


6 16 


3 120 


97 


101 


103 


Morris, 


6 


6 


16 


2 


64 


63 


4 


2 6 


1 47 


46 


30 


41 


New Hartford, . 


10 


10 


16 


1 


6 218 


179 


19 


8 18 


2 22 


18 


20 


18 


New Milford, . . 


18 


18 


17 


2 


3 410 


303 


31 


4 33 


2 264 


185 


187 


200 


Norfolk, 


13 


13 


12 


1 


6 143 


114 


11 


9 11 


9 97 


81 


81 


87 


North Canaan, 


5 


5 


15 


2 


1 122 


108 


11 


4 12 


2 77 


68 


59 


70 


Plymouth, 


14 


18 


16 


1 


6 308 


236 


25 


5 25 


2 239 


191 


238 


236 


Roxbury, 


7 


7 


15 


2 


4 94 


78 


6 


5 7 


6 67 


55 


43 


51 


Salisbury, 


14 


14 


21 


1 


5 231 


219 


23 


1 27 


7 167 


177 


164 


197 


Sharon, 


18 


18 


16 


1 


9 274 


219 


22 


8 25 


4 195 


146 


170 


178 


Torrington,. . . . 


11 


10 


15 


1 


6 242 


234 


18 


1 21 


5 182 


173 


131 


156 


Warren, 


8 


6 


13 


2 


2 83 


43 


6 


4 6 


3 54 


32 


35 


45 


Watertown, . . . 


9 


10 


17 


1 


7 159 


115 


10 


8 11 


2 124 


84 


85 


81 


Winchester, . . . 


11 


9 


16 


1 


5 240 


207 


16 


3 14 


9 164 


128 


119 


113 


Woodbury, .... 


14 


13 


18 


2 


4 209 


131 


13 


8 12 


6 146 


78 


87 


89 


Washington,.. . 


12 


12 


15 


"2 


1 152 


128 


12 


8 15 


2 120 


89 


84 


112 



* Taken from previous Report. 



102 



WINDHAM COUNTY. 









00* 


00 

"o 
























O 


o 


















• 




00* 

*o 

o 
-a 
o 

(0 

s 
o 


o 

— 
o 

09 

to. 
V 

a 


s 

u 

B 
B 

3 
■j. 


- 


u 

<o 

3 
I 

5 

c 


- 

= 
g 


u 

9 

= 
B 

3 

09 

C 


u 

9 

"3 


C 

9 

B 
B 
5 

.2 


& 

a 

a 


*.* 

CD 

a 
a 

3 
■ 

.2 

CO 


TOWNS. 




£ 

S 


oo~ 


of 


— 
2 


9 


2 




| 


.2 


3 


'to* 

'3) 




CO 


U 

o 

2 


CO 
9 
* 

.2 


.5 


m 

'Sd 
3 

00 

•>> 


'Sd 

09 
>> 


CD 

"S 
'Sd 

09 


«5 
00 

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JO 





o 

- 
6 

3 
1 

"8 


o 

CD 

- 

3 
1 


Vto. 

O 

■a 
o 

3 

•a 




00 

»3 


3 


& 


fao 




o 

-3 


'Sd 


"& 


a 

9 


3 


s 

CD 


i 

CD 

■toJ 




«to* 




o 


JJ 


V 


(4_ 

o 


o 


* 


o 




"5 


CS 


i 




to. 








fe 


to, 


1 


— 


CD 

bD 


B 


CD 

to 


CD 

9 




X) 


,o 


2 


2 


,c 


,C 


& 


rf) 


f 8 


2 


G3 




S 


S 


a? 


a> 


S 


E 


fi 


a 


co 


9 


CD 


CD 




3 


3 


> 


> 


3 


3 


3 


3 


t> 


► 


► 


> 




fe 


£ 


< 


<1 


fc 


* 


te 


te 


< 


«*4 
140 


< 

92 


< 


Brooklyn, 


9 


10 


19 


11 


192 


169 


124 


136 


172 


96 


Ash ford, 


10 


10 


13 


19 


144 


114 


89 


128 


112 


83 


60 


94 


Canterbury,. . . 


12 


12 


18 


12 


212 


184 


90 


113 


160 


125 


63 


83 


Chaplin, 


1 


6 


16 


M 


67 


63 


24 


36 


63 


50 


18 


28 


Eastford, 


8 


8 


14 


12 


142 


102 


89 


90 


90 


59 


45 


58 


Hampton 


7 


7 


17 


14 


105 


101 


58 


100 


79 


'.'■1 


42 


66 


Killinerly 


18 


20 


18 


18 


468 


400 


326 


340 


330 


289 


228 


229 


Plainfield, 


14 


11 


18 


15 


314 


245 


265 


27" 


222 


164 


142 


159 


Pomfret, 


10 


10 


13 


14 


162 


1! B 


101 


108 


139 


132 


69 


71 


Putnam 


7 


9 


18 


11 


259 


219 


210 


284 


173 


143 


148 


152 


Scotland, 


5 


6 


11 


13 


84 


83 




59 


75 


67 


26 


43 


Sterling, 


9 


9 


14 


13 


181 


112 


75 


90 


87 


72 


44 


61 


Thompson 


13 


15 


15 


16 


800 


241 


260 




218 


170 


181 


181 


Voluntown,. . . 


10 


10 


17 


9 


151 


122 


M 


128 


88 


76 




81 


Windham, 


11 


12 


17 


18 


438 


887 




819 


317 


29S 


256 


205 


Woodstook, . . . 


17 


18 


15 


14 


353 


8t2 


204 


819 


270 


260 


167 


209 



103 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 







00 


ad 

o 

SB 


CO 

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o 
so 

u 


u 


u 

43 


u 


u 

9 


9 


u 

9 

a 


9 


9 

a 
a 






o 


V 


fl 


<o 


Id 


a* 


a 


a 


a 


3 






O 

.3 
o 

0U 


a 


E 

3 

B0 


a 


3 

3 

00 


a 


a 

3 

00 


s 


3 
■ 

3 


1* 

3 


3 

00 


TOWS. 




a 
o 


oq~ 


O 


.s 

T3 


■73 


T3 


.2 

T3 


00 


B0 


03 


JD 






a 

o 

9 


A4 


9 


go 


U 

09 


u 
o 

00 


"So 


^5 


o 




O 




00 


U 




CJO 


So 


'to 


to 


, 9 


0> 












.s 


a 


U 


u 


o> 
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(0 

u 


o 
a 


3 


o 

3 


o 

3 




B 




*« 


M 


00 


00 

>> 


JO 


09 


3 


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03 


S3 
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s 


3 


to 

a 


O 
^5 


J 


'3d 


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3 




43 


3 
03 

— 


3 

O) 




f 


•<- 
o 


<u 


<u 


o 


O 


O 


o 


03 


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Middletown,*. . 


20 


21 


16 


16 


340 


300 


250 


285 


260 


246 


200 


210 


Middleto'u.city, 


1 


7 


22 


21 


465 


491 


535 


640 


300 


322 


284 


338 


Chatham, 


12 


12 


16 


17 


182 


139 


125 


142 


135 


111 


97 


114 


Chester, 


4 


4 


19 


17 


90 


70 


76 


82 


69 


48 


46 


54 


Clinton, 


6 


7 


18 


18 


142 


127 


111 


127 


101 


93 


98 


96 


Cromwell, 


5 


6 


18 


19 


174 


143 


145 


173 


108 


131 


85 


123 


Durham, 


6 


6 


17 


17 


93 


103 


77 


102 


74 


76 


48 


74 


East Haddam,. 


17 


17 


18 


16 


270 


252 


202 


263 


211 


197 


137 


181 


Essex, 


6 


6 


21 


18 


130 


105 


107 


97 


96 


84 


63 


63 


Haddam, 


14 


14 


18 


16 


219 


160 


124 


173 


149 


120 


80 


111 


Killingworth,. . 


8 


16 


16 


16 


116 


100 


63 


69 


92 


90 


48 


56 


Old Saybrook,. . 


4 


4 


20 


15 


88 


68 


73 


66 


58 


44 


43 


42 


Portland 


7 


12 


20 


18 


383 


368 


311 


368 


266 


265 


207 


251 


Saybrook 


4 


ft 


20 


20 


100 


93 


87 


92 


72 


67 


61 


67 


Westbrook, 


7 





18 


16 


105 


93 


68 


91 


73 


59 


43 


64 



* From previous Report. 



104 



TOLLAND COUNTY. 











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Andover, 


4 


4 


16 


16 


64 


47 


39 


37 


56 


40 


29 


25 


Bolton, 


5 


5 


16 


13 


84 


58 


47 


54 


56 


42 


32 


36 


Columbia,. . . . 


7 


7 


17 


12 


104 


95 


64 


73 


78 


72 


46 


57 


Coventry, 


10 


11 


16 


1~ 


227 


170 


139 


169 


173 


119 


95 


117 


Ellington,. . . . 


9 


9 


15 


13 


12S 


104 


95 


112 


102 


80 


81 


95 


Hebron 7 


11 


22 


16 


12 


125 


92 


78 


89 


117 


84 


92 


96 


Mansfield,. . . . 


16 


16 


14 


18 


226 


180 


136 


147 


200 


133 


113 


110 


Somers, 


10 


12 


14 


14 


166 


143 


164 


188 


144 


135 


90 


119 


Stafford.. . 


18 


22 


13 


15 


389 


290 


325 


315 


302 


212 


219 


220 


Tolland 


12 


12 


14 


13 


137 


117 


102 


105 


108 


l<rj 




97 


Union 


6 


6 


13 


13 


90 


55 


17 


66 


72 


41 


32 


39 


Vernon, 


8 


7 


16 


18 


396 


354 




! 81 


366 


327 


290 


324 


"Wellington,. . . 


9 


9 


13 


15 


107 


78 


80 


84 


86 


56 


61 


64 



105 



TABLE II— HARTFORD COUNTY. 

























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Hartford, 


378S3858 


2726 


882 


1798 


535 


15 


14 


60 


61 


75 


26 


Avon, 


166| 165 


123 


39 


77 


10 








6 


6 




16 


Berlin 


400 400 


240 


90 


200 


10 


1 


1 


10 


9 


*40* 


18 


Bloomfield, 


172 184 


101 


19 


50 


2 


2 





7 


9 


30 


20 


Bristol, 


530| 525 


445 


100 


330 


61 


4 


2 


13 


14 


37 


19 


Burlington,.. . . 


245 245 


155 


34 


111 


11 


2 





7 


9 


32 


13 


Canton, 


485 4S5 


349 


76 


201 


47 


3 


1 


10 


11 


38 


19 


East Hartford. , 


453 485 


37 6 


48 


247 


32 


5 


1 


7 


10 






East G runny. . . 


118; 124 


76 


25 


68 


5 


2 





4 


6 


32 


18 


East Windsor,. 


495 ! 500 


229 


96 


171 


38 


14 




10 


14 


34 


20 


Enfield, 


1649 1816 


953 


j 134 


416 


32 


8 





18 


26 


34 


20 


Farmington, . . . 


597 609 


353 


84 


308 




5 


3 


12 


12 


37 


19 


Glastenbury... . 


984! 967 


560 


! 125 


443 


51 


8 





12 


18 


31 


16 


Granby 


300j 286 


216 


| 62 


142 


12 








10 


10 


. . . . 


19 


Hartland, 


171 159 


180 


41 


86 


10 


1 





8 


9 


20 


16 


Manchester,. . . 


529 531 


337 


85 


215 


21 


4 





7 


H 


33 


21 


Marlborough,. . 


94 91 


67 


18 


40 


17 


1 





2 


4 


39 


15 


New Britain,. . . 


1185 1185 


942 


,190 


627 


94 


2 


2 


14 


16 


62 


22 


Rocky Hill... . . 


120 ne 


90 


50 


60 


40 


3 





2 


4 


35 


20 


Simsbury, 


4^8! 475 


213 


54 


163 


32 


1 





12 


13 


28 


18 


South Windsor, 


274' 274 


170 


35 


130 


13 


1 





9 


10 


32 


19 


Southington, . . 


934 962 


630 


■ 87 


438 


39 


,<s 


1 


8 


12 


36 


20 


Suffield, 


607 593 


400 


, 101 


271 


SO 


8 


1 


6 


13 


35 


20 


West Hartford,. 


192 193 


138 


34 


86 


8 


1 





6 


7 


28 


24 


Wethersfield,. . 


346 331 


213 


37 


167 


12 


4 


1 


6 


9 


32 


19 


Windsor, 


346 325 


235 


51 


142 


25 


6 





4 


10 


36 


25 


Windsor Locks, 




40 


15 


30 


00 


1 





4 


5 


50 


30 









10G 



NEW HAVEN COUxNTY. 

























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New Haven,. . . 


5131 


4908 


4819 


614 


2752 


152 


8 


8 


73 


73 


113 


33 


Fair Haven,. . . 


348 


325 


206 


10 


130 


6 


1 


1 


6 


5 


54 


22 


Westville, 


185 


1S7 


130 


29 


127 


6 


1 


1 


2 


2 


65 


21 


Bran ford, 


226 


318 


236 


71 


203 


8 


3 





6 


9 


29 


19 


Bethany, 


145 


145 


110 


42 


78 


4 


3 





3 


7 


28 


18 


Cheshire, 


340 


350 


239 


60 


206 


17 


2 





10 


12 


30 


19 


Derby 


1157 


1091 


744 


139 


533 


54 


4 


3 


17 


17 


65 


24 


East Haven,». . 


229 


220 


25 


35 


90 


20 


1 





8 


9 


40 


30 


Guilford, 


384 


369 


251 


98 


239 


8 


2 





13 


14 


28 


14 


Hamden, 


356 


857 


256 


77 


204 


35 


2 





11 


12 


31 


22 


Madison 


343 


340 


231 


65 


166 


6 


7 





6 


12 


30 


16 


Meriden 


1040 


875 


584 


115 


471 


121 


4 


3 


14 


14 


63 


20 


Middlebnrv,. .. 


147 


135 


100 


33 


73 


5 


2 





3 


6 


27 


16 


Milford,. . . 


327 
429 


327 
444 


87 
262 


30 

72 


96 

198 


5 
53 






12 
10 


12 
10 


55 


24 


Nau^atuck, . . . 


1 


**o' 


15 


North Bran ford 


205 


205 


137 


43 


117 


14 


1 





7 


7 


22 


19 


North Haven,. . 


191 


254 


171 


41 


123 


23 


2 


. 


5 


7 


81 


21 


Orange, 


286 


281 


194 


67 


129 


89 


1 





7 


8 


39 


19 


Oxford 


212 


205 


174 


66 


130 


12 


3 





10 


13 


20 


16 


Prospect 


100 


98 


82 


15 


61 


2 


B 





2 


5 


20 


16 


Seymour 


286 


281 


166 


33 


122 


1 


2 





4 


6 


31 


25 


Southbury, . . . 


300 


258 


200 


150 


165 


50 


2 





7 


9 


26 


18 


W&lliagford,. . . 


412 


412 


230 


105 


240 


28 


3 


1 


9 


11 


43 


20 


Waterbnry,.. . . 


1763 


1776 


1070 


244 


925 


70 


1 


1 


36 


37 


113 


20 


Woodbridge,. . . 


91 j 


117 


86 


25 


70 


4 


2 





2 


4 


40 


30 


Wolcott, 


107) 


107 


72 


15 


61 


1 


3 





3 


6 1 


30 


19 



107 



NEW LONDON COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 


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225 
25 

142 
87 
33 
89 

228 

111 
84 
15 
61 
88 

158 

218 
70 
40 

101 
54 
92 
18 
38 
95 

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187 

102 

188 

639 

167 

190 

31 

85 

181 

487 

586 

273 

124 

173 

94 

190 

81 

95 

513 

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127 

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96 
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18 
23 

11 
117 
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Colchester, 

East Lyme,. . . . 

Franklin 

Griswold, 

Groton, 

Lebanon, 

Ledyard, 

Lisbon 

Lyme, 

Montville, 

Norwich, 

Norw'h Center, 
Nor. W.Chelsea, 
Norwich Town 
N. Stonington,. 

Old Lyme, 

Preston, 

Salem 

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Stonington,. . . . 
Waterford,. . . . 


1820 
193 
699 
284 
153 
490 
931 
307 
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839 
396 
165 
390 
247 
343 
123 
280 
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1817 
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358 
153 
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972 
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346 
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1067 
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396 
153 
392 
247 
369 
120 
267 
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1099 
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270 
115 
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693 
291 
223 
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704 
759 
314 
128 
275 
159 
263 
92 
152 
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27 
19 
17 
25 
12 
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24 
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13 
15 
12 
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108 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 



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Fairfield, 


655 


667 


418 


109 


357 


46 


12 


2 


10 


18 


24 


15 


Daubury, 


1106 


1101 


630 




578 


13 


7 


2 


16 


21 


42 


19 


Bethel, 


234 


234 


178 


43 


152 


17 


4 


1 


2 


5 


31 


17 


Bridgeport, . . . 


1596 


1551 


1186 


173 


959 


199 


8 


7 


28 


29 


54 


22 


Brookfield, .... 


187 


162 


119 


51 


103 


10 


2 





6 


8 


27 


16 


Darien, 


272 


292 


192 


51 


144 


20 


4 


•J 


1 


8 


38 


24 


Easton, 


214 


212 


138 


56 


136 


3 


7 


o 


1 


7 


16 


10 


Greenwich, . . . 


756 


767 


491 


162 


336 


69 


6 


1 


17 


19 


88 


21 


Huntington,. . . 


240 


240 


170 


70 


1! 1 


6 


3 





8 


11 


24 


16 


Monroe, ■• ... 


193 


190 


137 


60 


112 


14 


2 





5 


7 




18 


New Canaan,. . 


416 


430 


432 


12> 


288 


IS 


4 


1 


9 


12 


27 


14 


New Fairfield,. 


185 


165 


104 


46 


89 


4 


2 





5 


7 




15 


Newtown, 


470 


572 


284 


80 


276 


24 


11 


1 


9 


19 




18 


Norwalk, 


1199 


1197 


779 


157 


816 


'.'1 


7 


4 


14 


15 




22 


Redding 


•j,;,, 


245 


170 


61 


l:.l 


19 


4 


1 


5 


9 




17 


Ridgefield, .... 


:;47 


B45 


261 


53 


172 


14 


4 


1 


10 


18 


24 


13 


Sherman 


154 


L26 


112 






1 


4 





o 


6 


28 


16 


Stamford, 


982 




738 


184 




21 


9 


7 


14 


16 


31 


19 


Stratford 


261 


265 




53 


148 


14 


1 


o 


11 


8 


20 


20 


Trumbull, 


186 




7" 


25 


76 


15 


4 





2 


6 


3» 


18 


Weston, 


826 


1S9 


11" 






7 


4 





2 




20 


15 


Westport 


889 


886 


310 


106 




12 


9 





1 


10 


21 


18 


Wilton 


363 


37<> 


284 


71 


179 


8 


6 


3 


3 


6 


22 


12 



109 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 



TOWNS. A 



Litchfield, 

Barkhamsted, 

Bethlem, 

Bridgewater, .. 

Canaan, 

Colebrook,... . 

Cornwall, 

Goshen, 

Harwinton,... , 

Kent, 

Morris, 

New Hartford, 
New Milford, . . 

Norfolk, 

North Canaan, 
Plymouth,. . . . 

"Koxbury 

Salisbury, .... 

Sharon, 

Torrington,... 

Warren, 

Watertown, . . 
Winchester, . . 
Woodbury, . . 
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251 


260 


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124 


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9 


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217 


213 


146 


32 


113 


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328 


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88 


195 


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8 


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142 


142 


118 


32 


82 


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369 


342 


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86 


167 


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711 


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501 


166 


435 


32 


13 


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18 


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242 


262 


170 


76 


106 


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10 


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228 


228 


159 


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540 


400 


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300 


25 


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12 


16 


36 


174 


172 


139 


51 


129 


2 


1 


1 


6 


7 


22 


504 


480 


264 


83 


219 


11 


6 





7 


14 


37 


524 


520 


329 


116 


256 


27 


8 





10 


18 


26 


454 


436 


320 


170 


312 


71 


6 





13 


14 


40 


141 


141 


100 


26 


82 





4 





2 


6 


30 


290 


282 


222 


66 


196 


20 


9 


1 


2 


9 


29 


378 


366 


245 


35 


133 


15 


4 


1 


7 


10 


25 


336 


326 


247 


77 


205 


15 


5 


1 


8 


12 


25 


276 


376 


810 


50 


173 


23 


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29 






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17 
15 
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12 
21 
19 
15 
22 
19 
19 
14 
16 
16 
16 
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110 



WINDHAM COUNTY. 









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Brooklyn 


325 


315 


215 


82 L91 


68 


7 


1 


6 


20 


Ashford, 


283 


28S 166 


57 120 


IS 


6 





4 


10 


2o 


14 


Canterbury, . . . 


382 


384 25S 


S3 202 


24 


5 





7 


11 


8 J 


17 


Chaplin, 


130 


130 80 


41 68 


20 


3 





8 


6 


22 


11 


Eastford, 


208 


239 166 


35 113 


7 


4 





6 


8 


31 


20 


Hampton, 


204 


204 126 


41 79 


7 


5 





2 


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26 


14 


Killingly 


851 


851 569 


200 886 


60 


11 


1 


9 


18 




20 


PlainhVld 


65" 


654 865 


193 285 


20 


6 





9 


lo 


30 


20 


Pomfret, 


425 


42o 292 




•-7 


6 





3 


10 




19 


Putnam, 


548 


347 


97 177 


27 


6 





4 


8 


28 


18 


Scotland, 


208 


LS6 


56 83 


7 


3 





2 


5 


28 


17 


Sterling, 


231 


23 7 162 


20 69 


2 


4 







9 


2'J 


16 


Thompson, 


839 


819 451 


167 296 


61 


7 


1 


6 


13 


33 


19 


Voluntown, . . . 


184 


176 149 


47 91 


10 


6 


1 


4 


y 




14 


Windham 


775 


774 515 


168 34 5 


68 


8 


3 


9 


18 


35 


16 


Woodstock,... . 


568 


663 


169 254 


32 


9 





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18 


2, 


20 



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Middletown,.. . 


500 


500 


350 


100 


275 


50 


5 





16 


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21 


27 


16 


Middlet'n, city,. 


956 


956 


700 


150 


500 


20 


3 


3 


13 


12 


77 


25 


Chatham, 


341 


325 


218 


44 


144 


19 


3 





10 


13 


34 


17 


Chester, 


160 


160 


77 


18 


67 


3 


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3 


4 


30 


20 


Clinton 


274 


273 


174 


55 


153 





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5 


5 


29 


20 


Cromwell, 


323 


323 


79 


52 


115 


14 


4 


1 


2 


5 


36 


25 


Durham, 


198 


198 


131 


48 


113 


2 


2 


.... 


4 


6 


32 


28 


East Haddam,. . 


640 


640 


425 


110 


316 


31 


3 





16 


19 


35 . 


19 


Essex, 


251 


281 


156 


55 


136 


2 


4 





6 


6 


32 


20 


Haddam 


374 


374 


2S4 


80 


210 


22 


11 


o 


3 


13 


32 


17 


Killingworth,. ■ 


228 


228 


194 


78 


157 


9 


4 





4 


8 


25 


15 


Old Saybrook,. 


142 


139 


67 


21 


55 


8 


2 





2 


4 


26 


19 


Portland 


831 


789 


434 


73 


288 


31 


5 


2 


6 


10 


40 


23 


Saybrook, 


195 


191 


164 


6S 


96 


14 


2 





3 


5 


29 


20 


Westbrook, .... 














3 





4 


7 


22 


15 



112 



TOLLAND COUNTY. 

























J3 


.2 
























C 


i 


























CD 












-'. 












c 

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— 
S 




•3 

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8 


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6 

B 

— 

5 


£ 

r. 

f 


1 

G 

I 

u 


>. 

■— 
o 

— 

— 


u 
1 

— 

a 

5 

c 


I 

E 


i 

a 
1 


a> 

B 

a 



CO 


■ 

-2 

i 


m 

9 




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a 


c 


fl 


.= 


C| 


a 


= 


C 


o 


o 


TOWNS. 


p 


- 
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"6, 


'ft 




■ 

1 

- 


3) 

- 




e 

m 
— 

■- 

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B 

— 

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5 
1 


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i 




43 

a 


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- 


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i 


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— 


- 


u 




s 

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i 


1 

i 

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| 


E 

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9 


o 
| 


- 
a 
1 


E 


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■ 


— 

CO* 

-- • 

bore 


5. 

1 - 




Cm 




t— 


•m 


"_ 




«*- 


%- 


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> 
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O 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 




c 


c 


o 




- 


fc. 




u 


- 




~ 


u 


u 


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< - 


o a 




a> 


cu 


1 


S 


C 


1 


| 


<o 


V 


CD 


- r be 


tx — 




— 


- 


X 


— 


Z 


-O 


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— 


— 


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s 


I 


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E 


g 


§ 


E 


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> ° 




* 


* 


fc 


fc 


fe 


* 


fe 


ft 


fc 


* 


O 


<5 


Amlover, 


K'4 


104 


85 


42 


55 


14 


8 





1 


4 


27 


15 


Bolton 


138 


139 


95 


w 


IS 


9 


4 





1 


5 


22 


14 


Columbia, 


199 


199 


15fi 


40 


166 


17 


5 





2 


7 




20 


Coventry, 


614 


618 




139 


227 


24 


9 





2 


10 




20 


Ellington, 


257 


259 


1G6 


33 


102 


18 







6 


9 


29 


18 


Hebron, 


266 


259 


196 


63 


02 


14 


3 





9 


11 


26 


17 


Mansfield, 


400 


416 




114 


173 


40 


10 





6 


16 


26 


16 


Somers, 






. , , 








3 
11 



2 


9 
11 


11 
20 


25 
29 


IS 


Stafford, 




ioo 


622 


12S 


'231 


31 


18 


Tolland, 


260 


255 


189 


167 


US 


70 


7 





5 


10 


28 


22 


Union, 


153 


168 


W 




64 


1 


2 





4 




31 


17 


Vernon 


730 


729 


454 


93 


271 


37 


4 


1 


10 


13 


44 


24 


"Willinuton. . . . 


190 


198 


116 


27 


71 


11 








8 


8 




17 



113 



TABLE III.-HAETFORD COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 



Hartford, 

Avon, 

Berlin, 

Bloomfield, . . . 

Bristol, 

Burlington,. ... 

Canton, 

East Hartford,. 
Ea6t Granby,. . 
East Windsor,. 

Enfield, 

Farmington,. . . 
Glastenbury,.. . 

Granby, 

Hartland 

Manchester,... . 
Marlborough, . . 
New Britain,. . 
Rocky Hill,.... 

Simsbury, 

South Windsor, 
Southington,.. . 

Suffield, 

West Hartford, 
Wethersfield,.. 

Windsor, 

Windsor Locks, 



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03 

C 

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it 

CD 

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p 
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3 
1 
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3 

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2 
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p 
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a 
p 
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03 

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CD 
fa 
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t- 

o 
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O 
CO 

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O 
1 

CO 

o 

CD 

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p 

7 




1 



1 




2 







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03 

5, 

Cu 
03 

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O 
CO 

>> 

a 

03 

• 
> 
03 

— 

IS 

as 

"o 

O 

J3 
O 

CO 

Cm 

O 

P *" 

13 
4 
8 

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4 
5 

1 

7 
5 
7 
17 
3 
2 


5 

G 

5 
9 
6 

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4 
7 
3 


03 

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s 

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03 

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CO 
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O 
tri 

CD 
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P 

14 
4 
9 
3 
7 

7 
4 
3 
5 

14 
8 

16 
8 
2 
9 
1 
9 
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10 
8 
8 
8 
5 
6 
6 
3 


16 

6 

9 

9 

9 

8 

6 

10 

5 

11 

9 

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14 

10 

7 

8 

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11 

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11 

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9 







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17 

3 
9 
1 

1 
6 

7 
5 
4 
8 
2 

3 


s 

1 

6 
5 
3 

1 
4 
2 
2 


3 

2 

2 

1 
2 

2 
3 
4 
2 


2 


2 


2 
3 



8 
2 




1 




1 



114 



NEW II A YEN COUXTY. 



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c 

a 


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2 














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so 

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c 
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4 
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a 

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9 

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a 

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2'S 


• 
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09 
a 


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to 


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J9 


TOWNS. 


is 

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o 

00 

E 


O 

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CO 

V 
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3 
O 


00 

S 

Ob 

3 
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■ 
■ 

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CO 




■ 


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93 


CO 




ol 


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v- 


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Cm 


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<+-> 


Cm 


■— 


■— 


«*H 




vj 4-3 


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o 


o 


O 


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Q 


z 


C 


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L. 


b 


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a. 


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QJ Oi 


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43 


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x> 


— 


— s 


— 


— 




£~ 


3 g 


5 £ 


B 


£ 


a 


E 


5 





c - 


E 


a 




a <s 


3 ~ 


3 ^ 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


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D 


3 




25 


25 


fc 


fe 


25 


fc 


fc 


fc 


& 


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^ 


» 


New Haven,.. . 


36 


5 


1 


19 








19 


2 


LG 


19 


19 


1 


Fair Haven,. . . 


5 





1 


1 








1 





6 


2 


5 


2 


Westville 


3 








3 





3 








3 





2 


1 


Bran ford, 


4 


1 





7 


1 





1 


1 





4 


■1 


2 


Bethany 


3 


3 





6 





1 











6 


4 


3 


Cheshire, 


2 







9 


3 





3 








6 


4 


4 


Derby, 


15 
4 






6 
6 






2 

4 


1 

2 


4 

.... 


4 
6 


5 

7 


2 


East Haven,. . . 


•2 


. ! ! . 




1 


4 


Guilford, 


9 
6 


5 
5 


"6 


13 
9 


2 
3 


3 
* 3 


3 

1 






3 

4 


11 
6 


1 


Hamden, 


V 





5 


Madison, 


4 


_ 





10 





1 


1 








13 


3 


1 


Meriden 


8 


1 





13 







5 


3 


1 




11 


5 


Middlebury,... . 


3 







4 


1 





















Milford, 


7 
6 


1 
4 


i 




11 
5 


1 
1 


6 



1 
2 






4 
4 


8 
5 


2 


Naugatuck,. .. . 


' T 


i 


2 


North Branford 


2 








3 


4 








i 





_ 


6 


1 


North Haven,. . 


2 


1 





7 













o 


2 


7 


3 


Orange 


3 


3 





6 


1 


4 





1 





1 


2 





Oxford, 


7 
1 


5 

4 






9 
3. 


4 
2 












9 
3 


3 


Prospect, 





6 





6 


2 


2 


Seymour, 


2 








6 





1 








" 


6 


6 


s 


Southburv 


3 

7 


*4 


n 



7 
9 


9 
1 


*9 


1 
1 








2 
5 


1 


WallingfJrd,.. . 


2 


o 




10 


Waterbury, ... . 


33 


3 





17 


a 





4 


2 


2 


5 


23 


5 


Woodbridge, . . 


2 


1 





2 


2 














2 


2 


2 


Wolcott, 


2 


5 





6 


1 














6 


4 


4 



115 



NEW LONDON COUNTY. 





a> 


<0) 


o 














. 








a 


-a 


-3 














Si 








S3 










CO 








a. 








-3 

is 


"3) 

cS 
S-i 


'2 


a 

c 
o 


a 

a 

o 


a 

3 


4 

u 

a 

*d 

4) 

O 




en 

<u 

-a 

ej 

u 


C3 

"o 

O 


co' 

p- 

C3 

e 

CD 

_3 


o 




£ w 


<0 


CO 

h 


O 


•T3 


o 


a 




u 
o 


a 


3 


o 

00) 




> > 
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CD 

is 


CD 

en 
a> 
en 

§ 

O 


o 

ej 


oi 

a 


o 

> 


CD 

A 

"S 


o 


a 

o 
<v 


c3 

.3 


O 

CD 
t> 

ej 
^3 


CJ 

> 


TOWNS. 


O © 


o 


-3 

"o 
o 


in 

CD 

CO 

a 
o 


en 

a> 
en 

o 


en 

a> 

CO 

p 

O 


00 

a> 
co 

S 
o 


■(J 
<*- 


r3 

O 




-3 

IB 


r3 




w c 


en 


-3 


Sfl 


.3 


.3 


,d 






en 






l S 


3 




'o 


O 


'o 


■© 


no 

o 


O 


13 
o 


oo 

'o 


OB 




| o 


3 . 


jg 


o 


O 

,3 


o 

,3 


© 


o 

►3 


o 

r3 


-3 


o 


5. 




<l> ^ 


OJ 83 


CD 


o 


O 


o 


4) 


o 


o 




"c5 


5J 




w o 


w a> 


3 


co 


co 


CO 


id 


CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 




•— £ 


«*-, ^ 


«M 


(H 


«ti 


«4-l 


l+H 


<*-t 


t~« 


S*jH 


«M 


, 




o *» 


O *3 


o 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


O 





O 


O 




• § 


&. c 


u 


t* 


|h 


t* 


1^ 


£j 


^ 


-_, 


U 


•j 




O rn 


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<x> 


a> 


<x> 


cd 


oj 


<P 


11 CO 


a> 


cu 




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pQ 


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rO 


rO 


r3 


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£ "£ 


- — 


a £ 


£ 


e 


3 


3 


a 


a 


s-i 


a 


a 




3 « 


3 '- 


9 ^ 


3 


p 


5 


3 




3 


= 2 


3 


3 




25 

24 


4 


3 




to 

6 








6 


5 


5 


9 


10 


fe 


New London,. . 


8 


Bozrah, 


1 








7 





7 


2 








3 


3 


4 


Colchester,. . . . 


6 


4 





13 


1 





1 





1 


12 


14 


6 


East Lyme,.. . . 


4 


3 





9 

















4 


6 


4 


Franklin, 


5 


3 





3 


2 


1 











5 


4 


1 


Griswold, 


11 


6 





14 











1 


1 


6 


2 


4 


Groton, 


13 


8 





12 


1 





4 


3 


1 


6 


7 


. . . . 


Lebanon, 


4 


5 





9 


3 


3 











3 


11 


8 


Ledyard, 





10 





11 


3 


11 




















Lisbon, 









7 
6 



1 


7 











1 
1 


1 
6 




Lyme, 


1 


1 


3 


Montville, .... 


4 


5 





8 


4 


"o* 


"6* 


1 





13 





2 


Norwich, 


18 








8 


3 





3 


1 


2 


5 


12 


3 


Norwich Center 


18 





1 


5 








5 




6 


17 


13 


17 


Nor. W.Chelsea, 


6 


1 





3 











6' 


1 


1 


3 


1 


Norwich Town, 


2 








4 








2 





1 


1 


1 


1 


No. Stonington, 


1 


11 





12 


3 


3 


1 








2 





5 


Old Lyme, 


5 


2 





1 


7 


8 











o. 


3 


3 


Preston, 


2 


1 





11 


12 





1 


1 





2 




1 


Salem 


2 








3 


5 


2 














2 


1 


Sprague, 


4 








3 


1 











1 


2 


2 


1 


Stonington, . . . 


14 


7 




18 


1 


1 


1 


3 


5 


7 


8 


7 


Waterford,. . . . 


8 


3 





11 





4 











8 


7 


1 



116 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY. 





eo 


oj 


<u 














. 








a 


9 


4-> 














OS 

a, 








03 

CD 




fcfi 


. 




£> 


. 






m 




►, 




© 


"B 


3 




o 


• 


R 


m 






, 


or* 


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— 


■*» u 






S3 


•— 




00 


o 


O, 


E 




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g | 


to I 

1 

b 


3 
X) 

13 
O 

O 


3 

s 

CJ 

— 


2 
g 


9 

! 

c 


03 

i 
J3 




0J 

:-- 
&> 


o 

CO 


03 

s 

«9 

3 




^3 




+-■ oj 


> 


V 


o 


H3 


•a 


'o 




o 


c3 


3 


CO 




«5 
«J CJ 


c 


53 


o 


CJ 

JZ 


3 


3 


0J 


E 


• 


O 


eS 




|| 


CD 


to 
5 


08 


cJ 


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S3 


5 


OS 


m 

o 


c3 


> 


CJ 

E 




OJ 




en 

3 


.2 


.3 


"S 


f 


be 


CD 
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14 


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12 


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13 


2 


2 


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6 


11 


5 


Bethel, 


3 








2 


3 








1 





4 


2 


1 


Bridgeport, 


26 


2 


1 


9 


1 


1 


5 


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3 


6 


10 


3 


Brookfield, .... 


2 


4 


o 


3 


3 














6 


5 


4 


Darien 





1 





3 


1 





2 











3 


2 


Easton, 




3 
6 



2 


7 
15 


1 
1 


8 
3 



11 








1 








Greenwich, 


19 


9 


12' 


5 


Huntington, . . 


2 


4 





1 


5 




4 








2 


2 





Monroe 


3 

8 






7 
9 












2 
2 


1 
5 


2 


New Canaan,. . 


5 


"o* 


2 


"o 


"6 


1 


"o 


5 


New Fairfield.. 


2 


1 





4 


3 


'1 











3 


1 


1 


Newtown, 


4 


1 





18 


2 


1 











6 


2 


10 


Norwalk, 


12 


2 


1 


10 


1 





1 





3 


3 


5 


2 


Redding 


6 








3 


7 





1 








5 


3 


2 


Ridgefield, .... 


6 


5 


1 


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4 














10 


3 


2 


Shei-man, 


2 


2 





5 


1 


3 











2 


2 


1 


Stamford, 


17 


2 





3 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


4 


10 


3 


Stratford, 


4 


1 





7 


1 





3 








5 


4 





Trumbull, 


3 


8 





7 





6 











2 


5 


4 


Weston, 


4 


1 








5 


3 




















Westport, 


2 






8 


2 














1 


7 


3 


Wilton, 


3 


i 





5 


4 














5 


4 






117 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 





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8 


Barkhamsted, . 


2 


2 





5 


2 


2 


2 


1 





3 


1 


3 


Bethlem, 


3 


5 





8 





2 











1 


4 





Bridgewater,. . 


15 


3 


3 


5 


5 


5 


5 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


Canaan, 


5 


2 





8 


2 


3 











8 


2 





Colebrook,. . . . 


5 


2 





6 


4 





1 


1 





4 


2 


1 


Cornwall, 


4 


7 





15 


2 





1 








3 


5 


1 


Goshen, 


4 


7 





11 


1 





1 








2 


2 


2 


Harwinton,. . . . 


3 


8 


1 


7 


2 





2 








7 


4 


2 


Kent, 


3 








2 


11 





1 








2 








Morris, 


2 


4 





6 

















2 


4 


6 


New Hartford,. 


5 


8 





6 


4 





1 


3 





9 


10 


5 


New Milford, . . 


4 


3 





15 


3 


1 


1 


1 





8 


13 


4 


Norfolk, 


6 


2 





7 


6 


6 














4 


1 


North Canaan, 


1 


1 





4 





1 


1 








4 


3 


1 


Plymouth, 


9 


7 


1 


11 


2 








1 


2 


4 


8 


4 


Roxbury, 


3 


4 


4 


7 


7 


2 


2 


2 


2 


4 


2 


2 


Salisbury, 


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1 





13 


1 


13 











2 


4 





Sharon, 


2 


10 





9 


9 





2 








5 


2 


5 


Torrington,.. . . 


5 


2 





14 





3 


1 





5 


2 


11 


3 


"Warren 





2 





4 


1 





1 








2 


3 





Watertown, . . . 


2 


3 





7 


2 














2 


4 


4 


"Winchester, . . . 


4 


4 





7 


1 


1 


1 





1 


6 


8 


3 


"Woodbury, .... 


7 


6 





10 


3 


2 


5 








6 


6 





Washington,.. . 


4 


3 





11 


1 


1 











6 


10 


1 



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11 


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5 


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Eastford, 


3 


5 





1 


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1 





1 


5 


4 


Hampton, 


1 


4 


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6 


1 














3 


6 


2 


Killinglv, 


11 


11 





15 


3 








3 




8 


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3 


Plainfield, 


5 


4 





12 


2 








1 


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6 


3 


Pomfret, 





4 


1 


9 


1 


1 







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5 


3 


Putnam 


5 


3 




7 











2 


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2 


2 


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4 


2 





5 




■0 











2 




1 


Sterling 


6 


3 





9 





1 


1 







4 





3 


Thompson 


3 


5 





9 


4 








2 




1 


1 





Voluntown,. . . 


1 


5 





7 


S 


2 


1 












Windham, 


12 


3 


1 


11 


1 





1 





2 7 


10 


4 


Woodstook, . . . 


4 


11 


1 


12 


5 


3 





2 


- 


8 


6 



119 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 





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20 


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1 








3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


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Chatham, 


9 


6 





9 


3 














6 


8 


3 


Chester, 


3 


1 





3 


1 














1 


4 


3 


Clinton, 


2 


2 





6 








2 


1 





5 


5 


5 


Cromwell, 


4 








6 











1 





2 


4 


1 


Durham 


1 








6 

















6 


6 


1 


East Haddam,. 


3 


7 


o 


16 


1 





1 


2 





5 


6 


8 


Essex, 


2 


2 





5 











1 





3 


4 


2 


Haddam, 


2 


2 





11 


3 


4 











1 


11 


11 


Killingworth,. . 


4 


4 





8 





4 











8 


4 





Old Say brook,.. 


2 








4 








1 








1 


4 


1 


Portland, 


5 


3 





7 








6 


2 





6 


6 


5 


Say brook, 


3 


2 


5 


5 








2 


1 





1 


5 


3 


Westbrook 


3 


7 





7 





1 4 











1 


2 


2 



120 



TOLLAND COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 



Andover,. 

Bolton,... . 

Columbia,. 

Coventry,. 

Ellington, 

Hebron,. . 

Mansfield,. 

Somers,, 

Stafford, 

Tolland. 

Union,. . 

Vernon,, 

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1 
1 
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9 

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m 

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1 
2 
1 
7 

4 
6 
2 
12 
2 
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7 
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3 

9 
3 

3 
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9 

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9 

21 

35 

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O 

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CO 
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9 

a 
3 
to 

4 
3 
4 

9 
3 
5 
11 
9 
7 

T 
4 
6 
4 


1 
2 
5 
9 
4 
3 
7 
9 
14 
8 
5 
7 
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3 
3 
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1 
5 
8 
6 
1 
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4 
1 
1 
3 




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1 








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2 
7 
2 
13 
2 
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1 
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1 


















1 

2 

6" 

6 




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4 

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5 





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I 



121 



TABLE IV.— IIAKTFORD COUNTY. 





T3 


]•- 1 

' 2 *-' 




- 


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s 

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09 

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a 

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9 


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CO 


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9 « 


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9 

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s 


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o 


o 


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3 O 


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s 


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ft 


e 


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a 


a 


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o 


o 


o 


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o 


o . 


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o p. 


««-. * 






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49 


+J 




49 


49 


49 


^ H! 


49 


jj — r 




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a 


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a 


c 


a 


c 


c 


3 w 




c § 


fc * 


<u rn 




3 


» a 





3 


3 


3 


3 


3 3 


3 




J3 X 


^5 3- 




O 


c 2 


O 


o 


O 


C 


o 


O O 


o 


° T. 


3 




a 


a-~ 


s 


a 


a 


a 


a 


a~ 


a 


B 9 


a * 


3 — * 




< 


< 


<5 


< 


< 


< 


15T50 


1580 


< 

30647 


■4 

103S3 


10 


to 


Hartford, 


8171 


1398 


13189 


21749 


592 


942 





Avon,.. t 


289 


216 




29 











3 


694 


22 


2 





Berlin 


630 


177 


675 


60 





194 





97 


1531 


221 


2 





Bloomfield,.. . . 


395 

1009 

377 

746 


242 
225 
200 
222 


249 
370 
215 
334 




















Bristol 


590 
225 

2785 


• 


527 






2819 


237 






Burlington,.. . . 
Canton, 




19 

37 






543 








2430 


445 


1 


7 


East Hartford. , 


788 
235 


329 
123 


404 
145 




















East Granby. . . 




130 


6 




5 


550 


85 




4 


East Windsor,. 


848 


230 


347 


660 


296 


90 


900 


35 


2115 


408 


5 




Enfield,..-:.... 


1756 


326 


825 


3669 


10 


54 


1232 


88 


4155 


331 


10 




Farmington, . . . 


913 


293 


627 


693 


331 


619 





11 


2502 


409 


3 


1 


Glastenbury,.. . 


968 


522 


384 


378 


701 


63 





88 


2448 


63 


4 


15 


Granby 


498 


217 


159 


150 


8 











816 


56 


4 





Hartland, 


242 


194 


108 


87 


, , , 








3 


585 


7 








Manchester,. . . 


850 


277 


401 


2265 


272 


71 


1810 


165 


2066 


157 


3 


6 


Marlborough,. . 


143 

1688 


108 



4031 


*365 


124 

281 






439 
5234 


14 
532 



3 





New Britain,.. . 


261 


1271 





361 





Rocky Hill 


307 


170 


240 





200 


20 





75 


900 


100 





4 


Simsburv, 


816 
440 







176 


200 
34 


20 
38 






42 

17 


1764 
1496 


180 
22 



3 


10 


South Windsor, 


116 


187 


2 


Southington, . . 


954 

950 


344 
503 


430 
809 


474 
391 


370 



123 
32 






24 

302 


2147 


108 
197 






Suffield 


3 





West Hartford,. 


370 


100 


352 


166 


44 


31 


1 




1193 


90 








Wethersfield,.. 


628 


280 


461 


122 




140 




160 


2030 


188 








Windsor 


606 


155 


669 


150 




79 





44 


1612 


165 


3 





Windsor Looks, 


572 





948 





















o 













122 



NEW HAVEN COUNTY. 





13 


55 

o 










5 

9 


3 

o 


GO 


3 
O 


5»H 


a 

o 




C 

e 

"o 
o 

*© 

CO 

<D 


a, 

a 
o 

m 


es 

CD 

co 

-5 

to 
c 
*E 

3 

•■o 


K* 

cd 

•a 
B 

'■— 


a 

t*3 


00 

0? 
O 

u 
3 
O 

CO 

U 

CD 

O 


P 


~z 
z 

.3 
o 

CO 

co 


o 

CO 
CO 

E 

'3 

b 


.2? 

k. 

c 

"2 

CO 

• 
"3 

03 
B 


3 
3 

3 

e 

- 

e 

fa 


E S 

— o 

es ^ 

— C 

r. ?. 
/. > 
i ■- 

3 r 


I- 

3 
O 

3 

3 

Si 

CO 

> 


TOWNS. 


a 

o 

CD 

> 


B 

o 

.:» 

CD 

> 


CO 

o 

CO 

U 

o 


B 
o 

• 

> 


«a 
s- 

T3 
> 


a 

o 

cp 


a 

T3 

CD 

T3 

a 


h 

<o 

— 
c 


1* 

T3 
CD 

T3 

a 

<o 


T3 

— 
co 


> - 

-3 a " 

- C 


3 ♦> 

S 'S 

^ 9 




o 






o 


© 




c 




— 




a 


J2 




eg 


9 




CD 


CD 


co 










? 


» ** 




"> 


U 


■ 






t- 


o 


' 


CD 


-. 








co 

c 
o 

s 


5 * 

B 


s 
o 

♦3 


>> 

- 

R 



B 


>. 
CD 

C 

o 

5 


1? 

s 
o 

B 


>> 

CO 

c 

1 


>> 

CO 

= 
- 

s 


- 
C 


g OS 

: r 

5 i. 


2 r 
1 I 

T3 D, 


■ = 




<*- 

o 


^o 


o 


O 


•m 

O 


o 


Cm 

o 


Cm 

o 


<— 

o 


c | 


"3 " 


^ 2 




-u 


•4J 


«a 


*» 


«a 


■4J 


«a 


*J CO 




* "o 




i J2 




a 


C -3 


3 


c 


c 


c 


a 


= r 


3 




»«s 


•5:2 




3 


3 3 


3 


3 





3 


3 


3 a 


3 






^5 C, 




o 


° 5 


o 


o 


o 


= 


o 


O O 


O 


© "S 




Is. 




B 


sc: 


ti 


B 


a 


B 


F 


-■^ 


a 


a s 


= — 




< 


< 


< 


<1 


«4 


^ 


-«* 


< 


m 


<j 


fe 


2 


New Haven,. . . 


9739 


1172 


7344 


3260S 


261 


100 


1S095 


2G27 






1 





" F. Haven, 


853 


109 


643 


1000 








1S000 


15 


1883 


3053 


1 





" Westville. 


318 


37 


241 


814 


.... 


300 





50 


1300 


125 






Branford 


677 


191 


310 





588 


43 





10 


1620 









Bethany, 


260 


I'M 


153 


70 


21 


6 








57 S 


16 


.... 


4 


Cheshire, 


649 








% 







6 




113 


1 





Derby, 


1868 


165 


1G79 


4331 


546 


19 




830 


6397 


688 


1 


3 


East Haven,. . . 


654 
6(»9 
775 


174 
352 
257 


375 
433 
429 


100 


395 
519 






25 
10 

12 


1212 
1687 


188 

173 

64 


1 


6 


Guilford, 


B2 

35 







Hamden 


1 


6 


Madison, 


592 
1S46 


327 
225 


209 
369S 


298 
578 


64 



13 

7 








93 


1356 

4919 








Meriden 


1000 







Middlebury,. . . 


157 
773 
77 S 


119 

493 

74 


107 

300 
349 










375 






75 

151 










Milford,. ...... 


154 

14 


25 

516 


120 




ISO 2 


211 






Naugatuck, . . . 


1 


6 


North Branford 


319 


128 


160 


43 


306 


73 





5 




21 





6 


North Haven,. . 


426 
539 
323 
178 








259 

7 


7 
56 
23 








25 

SO 


591 
1283 
1123 

462 


20 
39 







Orange, 


168 

2.10 

70 


:;l 4 

190 

65 


284 








Prospect 





204 





5 


30 





3 


Seymour, 


499 


109 


7s.. 


28 


.... 


19 




57 


1497 


111 


6 




Southbury, . . . 
Wallingford,. . . 


313 


220 


*>59 










50 


855 


99 






862 


354 


491 


400 




44 




21 


1993J 




1 




Waterbury,.. . . 


3365 


252 


l.-.Sn 


7977 


151 


62 




522 


9186 


193 1 


1 


2 


Woodbridge,. . . 


217 


149 


1S7 


.... 


324 


14 


°l 


26 


750 


60 


1 


4 


Wolcott, 


154 


122 


92 








505 


ol 


23 


fiSlI 


18'.' 


o 1 






123 



NEW LONDON COUNTY. 





a 


"?? 
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Ph 

oj 

T3 


! 

cd 

! >> 


j 
5 




OO 




oo 

P 
O 





A 


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a 
a 





B 


p 




'o 

o 


c 


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P 


O 
O 


O 


4 

.CD 


CJ 


55 " 







,£= 


o 


• to 


o 




CO 


.fl 


S-, 




0) 


^ 


p 




Vj 




c 




p 




00 


03 




*s 


s « 






s 


a 


1 5 

00 


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p 


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P 
s- 


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as 




u 

a- 


oo 3 


CD 

> 

'3 
. 




o 


o 


^ 


p 


a 


* 


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TJ 


a 

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• 




1- 
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TOWNS. 






£ 




"C 


7, 


- 


-73 





p 


d O 


2 ^ 








1 S- 


> 


t> 


1 > 


p 


a 


c 




53 2 






CD 

o 


CD 

o 


£ 


03 


CD 


cd 


cd 





p, 




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^^ 




a> 


V 






cd 




K 




x 




P , 


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u 


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V 


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>> 


>> 


>-* 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>^ 


>> 


2 °° 


O tf 














<x> 


<x> 








C CU 










3 


o 




p 


c 


3 


P 


c 


O M 


is 






o 
£ 


o 

£ 


o 
£ 


o 

£ 




£ 


O 

£ 




£ 




£ 




uo Q. 

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c*-i 


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r ->-i 


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Hi x 




■— CJ 




o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


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. 







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•u 


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+J 


4P 




^ a! 


j_. 




u t? 


t-^5 






c -d 


c 


a 


a 


R 


c 


C CC 


c 


a § 


J, «« 


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O S 


P 


p 


a 


p 


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o 


o 


o 


o 








c c 





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a 3 




£ 


£^ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


a 


£ 


£~ 


s 


£ «» 


£ ^2 


3 ^ 




< 


< 


« 


< 


< 
36 


< 

96 





< 

920 


< 

7492 


«4 

1500 


|Z5 

"7 


fe 


New London,. . 


2876 


669 


4000 


4103 





Bozrah, 


298 


145 


150 


86 


4 


127 








1084 











Colchester, 


846 


319 


455 


530 


9 


261 





17 


1899 


38 


1 


1 


East Lyme,. . . . 


462 
246 
643 


216 
142 
339 


153 

138 
280 














37 

265 

73 








Franklin, 


158 

288 


**9 


183 
28 





22 

4 


615 
1519 




Griswold, 








Groton, 


1506 
546 


349 

382 


622 
336 


49 
110 


651 
8 


772 
40 






907 
14 


3834 


595 
24 






Lebanon, 


5 


16 


Ledyard, 

Lisbon, 


454 
191 

388 

662 

1670 


358 
83 
242 
300 
345 


93 
93 

120 

304, 

1240 


700. 

25 

35 

1150 

5502; 










20 


1410 


45 








Lyme 








10 

14 

270 


779 








Montville, .... 


11 
151 






.... 




1 


Norwich, 


16 





6145 


1581 


2 





" Center,. . . 


1384 


253 


968 


9310 








6581 


671 


6380 


2137 


1 





" W.Chelsea. 










30 
12 









200 
20 


2700 
1110 


300 
154 


1 

1 





" Town, 


54 


207 


800 


163 


1 


N. Stonington,. 


529 


466 


267 


150 





52 





20 


1350 


560 








Old Lyme, 


422 


208 


160: 


15 


11 








44 


860 


24 


2 


1 


Preston 


605 
229 


312 
156 


244 
1091 


36 



278 



70 







6 

10 


1894 


82 






Salem, 






Sprague, 


666 


154 


329) 


14 


13 





700 





1119 





i 


.... 


Stonington, . . .. 


1738 


525 


1290 


1809 1664 


322 


300 


979 


5803 


596 


3 


8 


Waterford,.. . . 


833 420 


207' 


495 80 


36 





124 


If- 04 


285 









124 



FATRFIELD COUNTY. 





t5 
c 

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o 


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a. 

B 

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a 

B 

■ 

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B 
g 

o 


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m 

a 
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a) 

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3 

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a 

3 






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: 


B 


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B 


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o 

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p 

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B 

5 

V 

> 


B 

3 

13 
en 

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B 
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s- 


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u 

a 

T3 

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<ta 

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a 

o 
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B 

> 


B 

a 

u 

<2 

T3 
B 

T3 


b" 

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B 

a 


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B 

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B 

c 


O 

u 

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o 


i ► 

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8 

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B 
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B 

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b 


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b 


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b 


B 


B 


B 




B 

Cm 


X 


?*§ 


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b 
U 


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IK 


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B 


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b 


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a 




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a 


o 


o 

a 


e 
o 

a 


a 
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C 

o 
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E 


c 
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O 


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o 


o 


o 


= cu 


O * 


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49 


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fB 


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j-> 


♦J T 


Sc2 






a 


C r^ 


c 


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a 


c 


C 


3 co 


c 


5 2 


B ^3 




3 


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3 


B 


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3 


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3 


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o 




o 


o 


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o 


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Fairfield, 


1533 


1262 


370 


53 


711 


49 





67 


4070 


328 







Daubury, 


2 2 OS 


496 


1101 


9,504 


2003 


3?? 





515 


5545 


309 


5 


5 


Bethel, 


420 


79 


165 





685 








8 


1350 


123 








Bridgeport, . . . 


3770 


435 


2274 






1000 





3151 


soon 


524 


4 




Brookfield, .... 


308 
512 


191 

158 


219 
673 


94 







28 
48 






a 

n 






3 






Darien, 


1524 


63 





Easton, 


342 
2149 


95 
1051 


188 
1432 










32 

157 










Greenwich, . . . 


1031 


1083 


254 


2060 


180 


4120 




1 


Huntington,. . . 


344 


206 


212 





8 


S3 








160d 


31 





4 


Monroe, 


320 
826 


195 
301 


174 
363 


193 



43 
545 








813 
2S55 


82 

429 






New Canaan,. . 


53 





G 





11 


New Fairfield,. 


260 


141 


135 








13 





24 


333 


.... 







Newtown, 


1012 


507 


518 





448 


68 








2551 


116 





20 


Norwalk, 


2276 
451 


464 
240 


1227 

342 


4997 



2170 
108 


646 



5000 



26 

7 


5517 
1574 


1566 








Redding 





1 


Ridgefield, 


631 


374 


373 





350 


5 


306 


10 


1720 


150 







Sherman, 


283 

•1-i-l 1 


163 
1 54 


134 
1341 










3 
167 










Stamford 


2665 


1467 


137 





6661 


L! 54 


2 


13 


Stratford 


588 


289 


487 


150 


32 


112 




62 


1530 


75 




5 


Trumbull 


350 


l'.»0 


225 


300 


350 


42 





15 


950 









Weston, 


344 
988 
680 


164 
327 
347 


123 
626 

235 






66 
6 










21 
55 
80 


853 
2146 
1325 




56 










Westpoit, 

Wilton, 



142 















125 



LITCHFIELD COUNTY. 





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852 


354 


499 


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127 


2112 


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311 
235 
349 


150 
136 
149 


223 
158 
165 


124 


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11 





10 


1000 

569 

1053 


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Bethlem, 






Bridgewater, ... 


121 


196 


11 


25 


95 






Canaan, 


488 


178 


205 


66 


.... 


34 





168 


847 


51 







Colebrook, 


406 


205 


195 


267 


47 


103 





34 


895 


50 








Cornwall, 


700 


264 


239 




664 







60 


1675 




3 


17 


Goshen, 


406 


265 


266 





76 


60 





6 




83 








Harwinton, 


341 
542 

224 


241 
308 
133 


184 
186 
132 


220 










825 


20 






Kent, 














Morris, 


94 










2 


500 


19 








New Hartford,. 


724 


258 


261 


200 


171 


166 


2 


22 


1139 


144 






New Milford,... 


1061 
467 


465 
321 


599 
260 


"90 


238 
2 


150 
20 





46 
2 


4315 
1111 


334 








Norfolk, 


1 





North Canaan,. 


445 
1036 


173 
319 


234 
518 


13 

387 


991 


18 


5 
1400 












Plymouth, 


1376 


3277 


335 


1 


8 


Roxbury, 


281 


150 


149 


149 


109 


14 


. • . • 


10 


688 


14 




7 


Salisbury, 

Sharon, 


1013 
815 


199 
403 


561 

420 


158 


158 
163 


51 

51 


.... 


21 
44 


1470 
1921 








76 


4 


1 


Torrington,... . 


701 


261 


322 


133 


414 


482 





29 


3154 


143 


3 


1 


Warren 


232 


152 


105 





99 


C 








592 


C 


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Watertown, . . . 


440 


231 


394 


285 










161 


1618 


276 







Winchester,. . . 


916 


136 


598 


41 





47 





33 


1280 


22*? 








Woodbury, . . . 


563 


308 


351 


208 


437 


20 





221 


1568 


195 





13 


Washington, . 


455 1 250 30C 


432 


432 





34 


1280 


102 


1 






120 



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Ashford,. ...... 


404 


227 


146 


17 


104 








4 


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2 


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Canterbury, . . . 


530 


28S 


209 





157 


15S 





19 


1190 


148 





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Chaplin 


202 


124 


S7 


88 











10 


474 


12 





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Eastford, 


367 


177 


92 


8 





IS 










18 


1 





Hampton 


244 


164 


129 




27 


9 





43 


616 








3 


Killingly, 


1412 


462 


485 


254 




87 


.... 


36 


2405 


214 








Plain field, 


1014 


367 




27 











1477 


1858 


48 








Pomfret 


407 


316 


305 





34 


67 


650 


39 


100 4 


17 


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Putnam, 




273 


290 


161 










17 


1463 





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Scotland, 


180 




116 


150 




28 





6 


735 








4 


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176 






11 





152 


713 








3 


Thompson, ' 


974 


189 


528 06 





35 




96 


1769 





2 





Voluntown, 


423 


201 




. . . . 


15 




1 


868 


3 








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364 


688 1115 


28 


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132 


3356 




8 


4 


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937 


531 


429 


971 





62 


700 


40 


1750 


101 


4 






127 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 





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Middlet'n, city,. 


544 


4695 


.... 


1025 




1 




Chatham, 


560 


256 


258 


225 


231 








83 


13S4 


37 








Chester, 


281 
418 


133 
191 


119 
186 


83 
109 








10 
6 


550 
1210 


68 
113 




1 





Clinton, 


330 


14 





4 


Cromwell, 


620 


136 


173 


o 


897 


14 





145 


1568 


97 





6 


Durham, 


324 
872 


152 
408 


182 
369 


50 


167 

55 


156 
45 






2 

5 


820 








East Haddam,. . 


1943 


50 


3 


1 


Essex, 


433 


201 


274 


187 


222 


52 





19 


1144 


208 


3 


3 


Baddam, 


606 


448 


259 


187 


156 


29 




110 


1517 


74 


7 


2 


Killingworth,. ■ 


257 


198 


106 


185 




10 





2 


703 


51 








Old Saybrook, . 


319 


122 


280 


162 


96 


21 





100 


7*1 





2 





Portland, 


1192 


260 


522 


960 


149 


50 





37 


3079 


464 


2 


5 


Saybrook, 


305 


129 


176 


56 


10 


38 





21 


1133 


14 


3 


2 


Westbrook, .. . . 


294 


139 


184 


154 











18 


800 


6S 


5 


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128 



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96 


412 











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205 


112 


69 


87 


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38 


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5 


497 


30 


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Columbia, 


9fi0 


145 


104 




182 


17 




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Coventry, 


556 


275 


250 


222 


20 


25 





8 


1396 


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Ellington, 

Hebron 


412 


220 


193 






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4 


966 










232 


180 


77 


o 


99 





24 


767 











Mansfield, .... 


503 


405 


222 




260 


36 




43 


1206 






12 




428 


99 


200 











600 


50 






? 





Stafford, 


992 


330 


384 


443 


537 


68 





1G2 


2548 


-17 


1 


17 


Tolland 


398 
198 


230 

no 


149 
90 


444 

79 


9 
35 






50 
20 


1211 
449 








Union, 











2 





Vernon 


1 224 


170 


475 


2953 


to 


2 





19 


3558 


97 


3 





Willi ncrton, ... 


320 


213 


114 


*■> 








25 


581 


44 























120 






H 



p 




(/J 


o 


d 







> 


« 


w 


H 


H 


£ 


-1 


W 


^ 


& 


o 




o 




<{ 




a 




fe 








> 




a 



•sndnd ^uapisaj raoj; I « $ g> g«J| ^ $ - 
nopra} 9AI3D3J qcqq.u spujsip jo aaquinyj | 



umoi jo aAisnpxa l S[OCKpg joj xbj AVadoad 
b passassB* aABq qotijii spujsip jo .laquinsj 



•saoanoi aaqp uiojj p»Apaaj innoaiv 



-# aa ma ■* i- •& jj 
•.-t in o.ci-o .- = 



•aopm'j joj paApoai ^anoray 



•xb; pu^sip jo ^unoiav 



•JBaA* aqj Saunp spoqos S^SSoShBoq^h 
jo ?.ioddns gq; ioj xv% um.6\ jo lunouiy co © 5 ?J * '4 « e« 



Ct'/)C-HM X 

oo cc n » » 5 o »i 
x i- i- >.t i— r? cr -t 

OS "* CM i-l 



CO 00 O 'O ■>! X C5 " 

•punj ^isodaa I £ 3 « = 5 2 5 



•panj 
poqag aqj raojj paApaai A"auoai jo lunouiy 



•spjBA" 
pasopaa qijAV sasnoq jooqas jo jaqum^ 



•sSut 
pjinq-ino ^noqqM. sasnoq poqas jo jaquinjj 



uopipuoo pBq b ui sasnoq looqas jo laquin^ 



•uoa poo3 b m ^sasnoq jooqas jo aaqiun^j ° 



— <M C: CO -+ O O <D 

SI -t t-c — © O «© CO 



(O =0>nN I iO 



t-OTfiosjt-sap 



, 2 



■np papaaa sasnoq poqos Avau jo jaqnin^ | 



•sraaa-j aAissaoons a.ioui jo oja% looqos arass l2£2?:r£tS©co 
aqj ;q«nBj aABq o\\m. s.taqoBai jo jaquin^j 



I 3 



-qoBaiaiBcaaj jo 'qjuoui jad 'saSBAV aSBaaAy 



■qaBaj aiBcu jo 'qjuoui .iad 'saSBa\ aScaaAy 



03 CM OS <M CO OJ I CO 



CO «© C> — 1 O CO X S> 

uatnums or sjaqoBa; ajBajaj jo jaqom^ »gg g^SSJS 



Tf © GO I- CO f 1- ■ 

l~ CO lO t- CO c 

U)»)nH n 



uaonnns m saaqoBa; ajBca jo aaquin>j »*"^mh 



•ja^ujAv ui saaqoua; aiBca jo aaqainj^ 






spoqos aararans jo 's^aaAV ui 'q;3aai aSBaaAy ^^^iN^r.nh 



- CDOOOIfiCOClO 

spoqus ja^aiAi jo 's^aaAV ui 'qjSuaj aSeaSAy -"-"- | = < >'-"- | t-.'- 1 



■* CM C2 iC CO >-~ SO — 
CClCt-COCSt-COTf 
0»CMCMCNCM>-c— <i-i 



•spu^sip jo aaquin^j g§^|g2S§ 



G. 

TEACHERS' CONVENTIONS OR INSTITUTES, 

HELD IN CONNECTICUT, FROM 1839-1861. 



Ausonia, 

Ashford, 

Avon, . 

Berlin, 

Birmingham, 

Brantbrd, 

Bridgeport, 

Bristol, . 

Brookfield, 

Brooklyn, 

Canterbury, . 

Chaplin, . 

Cheshire, 

Chester, 

Clinton, 

Colchester, 

Columbia, 

Cornwall, 

Danbury, . 

Danielsonville, 

Deep River, 

Durham, 



J 850, 



1848, 
1849, 1855, 

. 1853, 

1847, 

1848, 



1852, 
1851, 



1S4T, 1854, 

1848, 1855, 

. 1848, 

1848, 



1861. 
1851. 
1850. 
1848. 
1857. 
1856. 
1860. 
1854. 
1864. 
1856. 
1860. 
1862. 
1855. 
1861. 
1854. 
1855. 
1853. 
1850. 
1861. 
1859. 
1857. 
1863. 



132 



Eastford, . 
East Iladdam, 
East Eartford, . 

Baal Haven, . 
East Lyme, 
Ellington, 

Essex, 

Fairfield, 
Fair Haven, 
Falls Village, 
Farmington, 
Glastenbnry, 
Goshen, 
Granby, 
Greenville, 
Greenwich, 
Guilford, . 
Haddam, 
Hampton, 
Hartford, . 
Hebron, 
Higganum, 
Jewett City, . 
Kent, 
Lebanon, 
Litchfield, 
Lyme, . 
Manchester, 
Mansfield Center, 
Meriden, . 
Middletown, 
Milford, . 
Mystic, . 
Mystic Bridge, 
Naugatuck, . 
New Britain, 
New Canaan, 
New Hartford, 



1850, 



1847, 1851, 



1839, 



1847, 



lSls, 



1851, 



1849, 

1848, 
1849, 

1846, 
1847, 



lS4s, 
1S54, 

1-47. 

1847, 



1859, 



1863. 
1860. 
1858. 
1853. 
1862. 
1848. 
1555. 
L850. 
1858. 
1855. 
1847. 
1860. 
1847. 
1861. 
1858. 
1850. 
1863. 
1856. 
1852. 
1*52. 
1863. 
1864. 
1861. 
1852. 
1S64. 
1861. 
1857. 

L848> 

1860. 
1853. 
1864. 
is;,3. 
1861. 
1851. 
1862. 
1857. 
1857. 



133 



New Haven, 


1847, 1852. 


New London, . 


. 1847, 1850, 1852, 1856. 


New Mil ford, 


1847, 1860. 


New Preston, . 


1851. 


Newtown, 


1848, 1856, 1864. 


Norfolk, 


. . . . 1848, 1859. 


Norwalk, 


1847, 1851. 


Norwich, 


. 1847, 1854, 1863. 


Norwich Town, . 


1860. 


Oxford, . 


1861. 


Plymouth, . 


1849. 


Pom fret, . 


1849, 1859. 


Portland, 


1858. 


Portersville, 


. - . . 1848. 


Putnam, 


1861, 1864. 


Quinnebaug, . 


1850. 


Redding, 


1859. 


Ridgefield, 


1862. 


Rockville, . 


1850, 1854, 1857, 1861, 1863. 


Salem, 


1863. 


Salisbury, . 


1858. 


Saybrook, 


1859. 


Scotland, 


1861. 


Seymour, 


1859. 


Somers, 


1856, 1864. 


South Coventry, 


1855. 


Southington, 


1852, 1863. 


South Woodstock, . 


1847. 


Stafford, 


1851, 1862. 


Stafford Springs, 


. • . . . 1858. 


Stamford, . 


1848. 


Stonington, 


1858. 


Stratford, . 


1852. 


Suffield, 


1849. 


Thompson, 


1853. 


Thompsonville, . 


1850, 1857. 


Tolland, . 


1847, 1S52. 


Union, 


18£2. 



134 

Vernon, 1849, 1860. 

Wallingford, 1850, 1862. 

Waterbury, 1847, 1854. 

Waterford, 1859. 

Watertown, . . 1848. 

Westbrook, 1862. 

West Cornwall, 1862. 

West Hartford, 1856. 

West Wellington, 1859. 

Willimantic, 1854, 1858. 

Windsor, 1848, 1855. 

Winsted, 1847, 1853, 1863. 

Wolcottville, 1850. 

Woodbury, 1856, 1864. 

Woodstock, 1857. 



CONTENTS. 



APPENDIX. 



A EXTRACTS FROM SCHOOL VISITORS' REPORTS. 



Attendance 



Bethany, 
Colchester, • 
Hartford, 
New Milford, 
Redding, 
Wes.tbrook, - 

Discipline : 

Hartford, 
Manchester, 
New Haven, 
New Milford, 

General Remarks: 



Berlin, 

Bristol, 

Canterbury, - 

East Hartford, 

East Windsor, 

Farmington, 

Guilford, ' - 

Haddam, 

Hamden, 

Huntington, 

Meriden, - 

Middletown, 

New Haven, - 

Plymouth, - 

Putnam, - 

Pomfret, 

Ridgefield, 

Rocky Hill, 

Roxbury, 

Sharon, 

Southington, - 

Newtown, - 

Scotland, 

Trumbull, - 

Westbrook, 

Wellington, 

Windsor, 





Woodstock, 


65 


43 


Graded Schools : 




44 
44 


Westbrook, 


- 66 


44 
45 


Parental Interest: 




45 


Colchester, - 


67 




East Haddam, 


- 68 




Lyme, 


68 




Mansfield, 


- 68 


46 


Morris, 


69 


47 


Naugatuck, 


- 69 


48 


New Preston, 


69 


49 


Vernon, - 
School Houses : 


- 70 


49 
49 

50 
52 


Redding, 


71 


Stonington, 


- 71 


Trumbull, - 


- - 71 


Vernon, - 


- 71 


52 
52 


Teachers : 




63 


Bridge water, 


72 


53 


Colchester, 


- 72 


54 


Griswold, - 


72 


54 


Guilford, 


- 73 


54 


Haddam, 


73 


56 


Manchester, - 


- 73 


58 


Mafasfield, - 


75 


60 


New Fairfield, 


- 75 


61 


Old Saybrook, - 


76 


61 


Pomfret, 


- 76 


62 


Preston, 


76 


62 


Roxbury, 


- 78 


62 


Salisbury, - 


78 


63 


Stonington, - 


- 78 


63 


Stratford, - 


80 


63 


Vernon, - 


- 80 


63 


Wallingford, 


81 


64 


Westbrook, 


- 81 


64 


Willington, - 


82 


65 


Windham, 


- 82 


65 


Woodbury, - 


83 



136 



B.— COURSE OF STUDY. 

New Haven, - - . . - 84 1 Hartford, - . 86 

New Britain, 8f 

C— SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL, 89 

D.— SCHOOL LIBRARIES, 93 

E.— NORMAL SCHOOL, 94 

P.— TABLES, 96 

G.— TEACHERS' INSTITUTES, - 131 








miJ 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



jltoartr rf Crates 



STATE REFORM SCHOOL 



OF 



CONNECTICUT, 

FOR THE YEAR 1865, 

ITS OFFICERS, BY-LAWS, REGULATIONS, &c, AND REPORTS OF TDE 
TREASURER, SUPERINTENDENT AND PHYSICIAN, 

TO THE 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 

MAT SESSION, 1865. 



irator bg ©rta xrf t\t ftphlm. 



NEW HA YEN: 
CARRINGTON & HOTCHKISS, STATE PRINTERS. 

1865. 



NAMES, RESIDENCE AND EXPIRATION 

OF COMMISSION OF THE 

TRUSTEES OF THE STATE REFORM SCHOOL 

ARE AS FOLLOWS, VIZ. : 
Hartfokd, 



ROSWELL BROWN, 

Term Expires, 

HIRAM FOSTER, 

Term Expires, 
D. P. NICHOLS, 

Term Expires, 

WILLIAM SWIFT, 
Term Expires, 

DANIEL G. PLATT, 

Term Expires, 

BENJAMIN DOUGLASS, 
Term Expires, 

HENRY McCRAY, 

Term Expires, 



Hartford County. 

1865. 
Meriden, New Haven County. 

1865. 
Danburf, Fairfield County. 

1866. 
Windham, Windham County. 

1866. 
Washington, Litchfield County. 

1867. 
Middletown, Middlesex County. 

1867. 
Ellington, Tolland County. 



1868. 

WILLIAM P. BENJAMIN, New London, New London County. 
Term Expires, - - - - - 1868. 



D. P. NICHOLS, Chairman, 
HIRAM FOSTER, Secretary. 

Executive Committee, 
D. G. PLATT, HIRAM FOSTER, WM. P. BENJAMIN. 



Auditor of Accounts, 
HIRAM FOSTER. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES. 



To the General Assembly, May Session, 1S65 : 

The Trustees herewith present to your Honorable Body 
their thirteenth annual report, ending March 31st, 1865. 

It gives them great pleasure to report the good condition of 
the Institution, its success the past year, and the encourage- 
ment they have from the reports of those who have gone out 
from the School, and from what is constantly coming under 
their own observation, to urge the State to not only continue 
its labor here to save the wayward youth, but to enlarge the 
field of their labors by increasing the facilities for training 
and educating those who need restraint and discipline. 

The Institution, the past year, has been full to overflowing, 
and never in its history has there been such a demand for ac- 
commodations here. We do not attribute this to an increasing 
moral delinquency on the part of the youth of the State, but 
to a desire on the part of the people of the State to avail 
themselves of the advantages of the Institution. The people 
are more awake to the subject of reforming and educating 
juvenile offenders, and instead of being satisfied, as heretofore, 
with the simple removal of the erring and unfortunate, they 
feel that these too have a claim on the Christian heart and 
kindly sentiment of the benevolent. 

Connecticut differs from many of the other States, from the 
fact that this is the only strictly reformatory institution she 
possesses. None of our large cities possess any local institu- 
tions, though Hartford has the nucleus for one, which we hope 
will be more fully developed soon. This, of course, brings all 
the juvenile offenders who are amenable to the law, into our 
reformatory. 



6 

The Trustees desire to call attention to this fact and to the 
one refeired to above, that we can accommodate no more only 
as we make room when these leave, and ask you to consider 
6eriously whether the time has not come to enlarge the capa- 
city of this Institution, by carrying out the original plan and 
completing this building by the addition of another wing. 
We aro aware that there are serious objections in the way, but 
believing it to be a part of our duty to the State, and believing 
that the State expects us to be pioneers in this matter, we can 
but express our opinion that the time has fully come when the 
State should complete this building and thus enlarge the 
sphere of its usefulness. You will be the best judges of the 
financial condition of the State and of the propriety of spend- 
ing the money for this purpose at the present time. You will 
also be aware of the difficulties in the way of our fixing the 
cost of the addition, for with the fluctuations attending prices 
of labor and material at this time, it is not possible for us to 
make an approximation to the cost. The people of the State 
need not to be told of the success of the School. The officers 
in charge of it are substantially the same as for the past six 
years, and of their ability there is no question. All arc aware 
of its success in general, and we think a careful study of this 
report will show its success in detail. The financial affairs of 
the School exceed our "most sanguine expectations. We are 
still able to report it out of debt, but this has only been done 
by cutting off rigidly every expense in repairs or otherwise, 
unless it has been absolutely necessary to expend the money 
to protect your property. The Legislature of last year made 
an appropriation of one thousand dollars for the purchase of 
land and for repairs. The Trustees think that they wisely ex- 
pended the money in the purchase of the lot of land lying in 
front of the Institution, and congratulate the State on this valu- 
able accession to their property. We hope at some future 
time, when the funds of the Institution will allow, to construct 
a road through this lot for a front entrance. Onr supply, Of 
labor for the boys has been constant for the past year, till 
within the last two weeks, and only for this source of income 
the School would be largely in debt. We hope that the s'op- 



7 

page in the supply of work may be only temporary, as it is 
caused entirely by the depression of prices consequent on the 
fall of gold. Now, although out of debt, yet the treasury is 
empty and there are some repairs and improvements which 
seem to be absolutely necessary. We need a woodshed — never, 
in fact, having had one — some sewers to carry off the waste 
water, and a wall round the boys' yard. All of these things, 
together with necessary repairs about the building, are press- 
ing upon us and demand our immediate attention. 

There are two ways in which the State can relieve us and 
do justice to the Institution. The first is to make us an appro- 
priation. You will remember that for the past four years we 
have had no appropriation, except the one thousand dollars of 
last year, to purchase land. The other way, and we think the 
best one, is to increase the price of board. We are only re- 
ceiving now what we received when prices were one-half what 
they are at present, and we would suggest as the best plan to 
relieve our present necessities, that you so amend the law as to 
give us two dollars per week for the board and clothing of 
each boy, and we think that with this increase, (said increase 
to take effect the 1st of April, 1865,) we should not need now 
or hereafter any extra appropriation. This sum of two dollars 
is less than any school in this country receives, and would 
enable us to build our woodshed and one side of our yard wall 
this year, another next, and so on until the whole is completed. 

The Trustees, who have served the State for the last six, 
eight or ten years, feel that they have a right to your confi- 
dence, and assure you that any money you may see fit to 
entrust to their care shall be expended wisely, judiciously and 
economically. 

The condition of the School was never more satisfactory, 
and the prospect for its future usefulness never more encour- 
aging. The property of the State is increasing in value every 
year, and the farm will soon be one of the best in the State. 
For the results of the labor on the farm and in the workshops, 
and for the general condition of the Institution, we refer you 
to the tables appended in the reports of the Superintendent, 
Physician, Treasurer, &c. Wc still are favored by the various 



8 

clergymen of the town, the reverend gentlemen Brown, Wool- 
lev, Farnsworth and Hay den. They have onr thanks, and are 
worthy the thanks of all good citizens for their zeal and love 
of doing good manifest in their labors here. 

We are happy in again commending this School to the kind 
and fostering care of the State. It is worthy of it, and the 
youth saved and educated, made good, virtuous and intelligent 
citizens, fitted to occupy any station in societ} r , is amply repay- 
ing the State for any money expended or any sacrifice made 
heretofore, or which it may be called on to make hereafter. 

We hope that the Legislature may satisfy itself of the con- 
dition of the School by a visit to it in a body. It will pay 
inspection and be a useful lesson to all who love the youth and 
desire their welfare. 

Your predecessors in both branches have treated us with 
great kindness and consideration, for which we are grateful. 
It only needs that the present Legislature should fully under- 
stand the noble work being done here, to enlist all their 
warmest sympathies. 

The terms of the Trustees for Hartford and New Haven 
Counties expire this year, and it will devolve on your Honor- 
able Body to fill the vacancies. 

Commending the Institution to you as one of Connecticut's 
noblest charities, and believing it to be an expression of New 
England benevolence outcropping here for the salvation of 
the wayward, and commending it to the good Father whose 
tender mercies are over all, and on whose benevolence we all 
depend, 

We submit this report most respectfully. 

DAYID P. NICHOLS, 
WM. P. BFNJAMIN, 
ROSWELL BROWN, 
BENJAMIN DOUGLASS, 
WILLIAM SWIFT, 
D. G. PLATT, 
HENRY McCRAY. 



State of Connecticut, New Haven County, ) 
Meriden, April 12th, 1865. J 

Personally appeared David P. Nichols, "Win. P. Benjamin, 
Roswell Brown, Benjamin Douglass, D. G, Piatt and Henry 
McCray, and made oath to the truth of the foregoing report, 
by them signed, before me, 

WILLIAM SWIFT, 

Justice of the Peace. 



Personally appeared William Swift, and made oath to the 
truth of the foregoing report, before me, 

WM. P. BENJAMIN, 

Justice of the Peace. 



BY-LAWS 

FOE THE 

GOVERNMENT AND REGULATION OF THE STATE 
REFORM SCHOOL. 

Adopted by the Board of Trustees, at a regular meeting /widen at 
Meriden on the 5th of Oct., A. D. 1853, revised by a Commit- 
tee of Trustees in 1861, and amended in 1865. 



The Trustees. 



Sec. 1. The Board of Trustees shall be organized at the 
regular meeting in July, annually, by the election by ballot, 
of a Chairman, Secretary, and an Executive Committee of 
three members, except the Executive Committee for the pres- 
ent year, who shall be elected at the meeting held at the time 
of the adoption of these by-laws. 

A majority of the members shall constitute a quorum for 
business. t 

The chairman shall preside at each meeting when present. 
In his absence, one may be appointed by the Board for the 
time. 

The Chairman shall call special meetings, whenever requested 
by any two members of the Board. Such meetings may be 
holden wherever the Chairman may direct. 

The regular meetings of the Board shall be holden quarterly, 
at Xhe Institution in Meriden, on the second Wednesdays of 
January, April, July, and October, in each year, the annual 
meeting being in July. 

The Executive Committee shall meet at such other times and 



12 

places as their duties may require, and report, their doings at 
the next meeting of the Board. 

The Secretary shall keep in a book, prepared for that pur- 
pose, a record of the proceedings of the Board, which shall be 
subject to the examination of each member. 

He shall prepare, or cause to be prepared, all documents, 
statements, and notices which may be directed by the Board or 
the Chairman, and shall give notice through the mail, or other- 
wise, to each member, of the time and place of each meeting 
of the Board. 

* 
The Officer-. 

Sec. 2. The following named officers of the State Reform 
School shall be appointed by the Board of Trustees, whenever 
their services may be required by the Institution, viz. a Super- 
intendent, an Assistant Superintendent, a Chaplain, Physician, 
Matron, Steward, Teachers, Overseers of the Workshop, and 
a Farmer. 

The several officers shall hold their appointments during the 
pleasure of the Board, and no resignation shall take effect until 
three months after being tendered, in writing, except by con- 
sent of the Board of Trustees. 

It shall be the duty of all officers and assistants to remain 
constantly at the Institution, and no one of the subordinate 
officers shall leave it without permission from the Superin- 
tendent. 

All the subordinate officers, in addition to their appropriate 
duties, shall act as aids to the Superintendent, in preserving 
order and quiet among the delinquents, in guarding against 
escape, and generally in maintaining the rules and discipline 
of the Institution. They shall also perform such other services 
as shall, from time to time, be required of them by the Super- 
intendent.* 

Sec. 3. The Superintendent shall have the general charge 
of the inmates, the business and interests of the Institution. 

He shall see that the subordinate officers are punctual and 



* Dr. E. W. Hatch is acting as Physician also. 



13 

faithful in the discharge of their respective duties, and that 
the regulations and hy-laws are carefully observed. 

He shall keep a journal, and daily make record of all occur- 
rences worthy of notice, whiqh shall be subject to the inspec- 
tion of any member of the Board. 

He shall perform all the correspondence, keeping files of all 
letters received, and copies of those sent, so far as of import- 
ance for reference. As Treasurer of the Institution, in suitable 
books he shall keep regular and complete accounts of all receipts 
and expenditures, and of all property intrusted to his care, 
showing the expenses and income of the Institution. 

He shall make out and present to the Comptroller the bills 
for weekly board of the delinquents, and perform all the duties 
of this department according to law. 

Under the advice and direction of the Executive Commit- 
tee, he shall procure the necessary supplies for the Institution, 
and purchase all such articles and materials as may be wanted 
for the support and employment of the boys, and dispose of all 
articles raised on the farm or manufactured by them, which 
are not wanted for use. 

In a. suitable book, he shall keep an account of all purchases, 
and the cost of delivering the same at the Institution. 

He shall daily inspect every available part of the premises, 
and have a watchful care over all the inmates, and be respon- 
sible for the proper care and discipline of the boys. 

He shall see that they receive no detriment to health, from 
want of sufficient clothing, by day or by night, from wet feet, 
or from any other exposure, and that the rooms and buildings 
are properly warmed and ventilated. 

He shall employ, whenever necessary, suitable persons, for 
any temporary services, not provided for in these by-laws, and 
report the same to the Executive Committee. 

At each quarterly meeting he shall report to the Board the 
number of boys committed to the Reform School, also commu- 
nicate full information of the state of the Institution, and make 
such suggestions as he may think proper for the consideration 
of the Board. 

At each April meeting he shall furnish the Board with a du- 



14 

plicate copy of his accounts, presented to the State Comptroller 
of Public Accounts, up to the 31st of March ; also a full sched- 
ule of all the property of the Institution, including everything 
in the care of the Steward and Fanner. 

He shall, at all times, be ready to perform whatever other 
services may be required by the Board of Trustees, for the 
benefit of the Institution. 

Skc. 4. The Assistant Superintendent shall assume and 
perform all the duties of his superior during his absence or 
inability. 

It shall also be his duty to aid in the discipline, instruction, 
supervision, and general management of the Institution, and 
to report to the Superintendent all instances of impropriety of 
conduct, neglect of duty, or violation of the rules and by-laws, 
which may come to his knowledge. 

He shall keep the account books of the Institution, and 
books in which shall be recorded the admissions, histories, and 
discharges of the boys, and shall be responsible for their neat- 
ness and accuracy. He shall make out and record the inden- 
tures, and do all other necessary writing which may be re- 
quired. 

He shall receive and attend visitors, and see to the proper 
intercourse between the boj^s and their friends. 

He shall examine all packages and letters received for the 
boys, and may, by the direction of the Superintendent, examine 
their letters before being sent aw T ay. 

Sec. 5. The Superintendent acting as Chaplain shall have 
the direction of the moral and religious instruction of the in- 
mates. He shall perform devotional exercises with the boy9 
morning and evening, have charge of the Sabbath School, con- 
duct the religious worship in the chapel on the Sabbath, and 
obtain such aid from the Reverend Clergy in the vicinity as 
may be necessary, and on all other days set apart for religious 
observance, and to officiate at funerals. 

He shall occasionally give familiar expositions of moral and 
religious duty, in such a manner as he shall deem most condu- 
cive to the good of the boys, and at such times, as may be de- 
termined on, by consultation with the Trustees. 



15 

He shall mingle freely with the boys in kind, familiar inter- 
course, and spend as much time with them in conversation as 
he may think will be for their benefit, and as will be consistent 
with the proper performance of his other duties, and his posi- 
tion in the Institution. 

At the quarterly meeting of the Trustees in April, the Chap- 
lain shall furnish his report, embracing the condition of this 
department, and facts respecting the reformatory influences 
effectively made use of in this Institution. 

The Physician.* 

Sec. 6. The Physician shall visit the School and inspect in- 
mates with a view to ascertain the state of their health, at least 
once a week, and as much oftener as may be deemed necessary 
by the Superintendent. 

He shall acquaint himself with the condition of the boys, 
and give such direction to the Matron respecting the care and 
treatment of the sick, as shall be suited to their wants. 

He shall also make any examination and suggestions he may 
think proper as to the best means of preserving health, and 
with reference to the general sanitary condition of the Insti- 
tution. 

He shall present to the Trustees, at their meeting in April, a 
true and full report of the state of health among the boys 
during the past year. 

The Matron. 

Sec. 7. The Matron shall have the general charge and di- 
rection of all the domestic arrangements of the family, the 
6ewing rooms, laundry, and hospital, and shall see that cleanli- 
ness, order and propriety are uniformly maintained in these 
apartments. 

She shall see that all female assistants, except teachers, are 
diligent and faithful in the discharge of their appropriate du- 
ties, discreet and regular in their deportment, and strict in their 

* The Superintendent performs the duty of Physician since 1st July, 1855. 



16 

observance of all the regulations of the Institution, and shall 
report to the Superintendent any remissness that may come to 
her knowledge. She shall see that the sick receive proper at- 
tention, and that the directions of the Physician are strictly 
complied with ; and she shall have a maternal regard for the 
health and physical welfare of the boys. 

She shall confer and advise with the Superitendent respect- 
ing the duties of the persons employed in the departments un- 
der her charge, and also as to the general management of the 
house. 

The Steward.* 

Sec. 8. The Steward shall have the general oversight of the 
domestic arrangement of the boys, their food and clothing. 
He shall see that the tables are seasonably and properly fur- 
nished for each meal, and shall have the care of all apartments 
used or occupied by the boys, except such as are assigned to 
the Matron. 

He shall have the care of all rooms and cellars, in which 
provisions, stores, and general furnishing articles are kept, and 
of all apartments used for the boys' clothing, bedding and ma- 
terials for the same. 

He shall personally deliver all articles for them, as the daily 
wants of the house may require, and shall be responsible for 
the cleanliness and good order of all apartments and articles 
under his charge and supervision. He shall keep accurate ac- 
counts of all supplies placed in his care, and of the time and 
quantity, as they are re-delivered for use, which accounts shall 
be subject to examination by the Superintendent and Trustees. 
He shall make such arrangements with the persons having 
charge of the culinary department of the boys, as to secure 
the presence of one or both at all the meals, to see that the 
food is properly prepared, economically distributed and used. 

He shall keep all the boys comfortably and properly clad, 
and see that their bathing and dressing is conducted in a 
proper and satisfactory manner. 

* There ia no such officer now known in the Institution. 



17 



Teachers. 

Sec. 9. The Teacher or Teachers shall instruct the boys in 
such branches of education as may be required by the Super- 
intendent, and shall use all proper means'to inspire them with 
a love of study, and lead them justly to estimate the value of 
a sound practical education, and shall constantly strive, by 
precept and example, to impress on their minds the importance 
of good order, self-government, and purity of body and mind. 

They shall take charge of the boys at all times in the school- 
rooms, and shall require them to be promptly in their places 
at the appointed time, unless they are absent by permission. 

They shall attend to the cleanliness and good order of the 
school-rooms, and shall be responsible for the safety, care, and 
preservation of all books, furniture, apparatus, and fixtures 
provided for the same, and by striet personal examination see 
that no injury or waste is suffered. 

It shall be the duty of the male Teachers to see the boys to 
their beds, to close and secure the doors of their dormitories, 
to see that they rise in the morning at the ringing of the bell, 
and make their beds in a proper manner, and attend to their 
washings, before assembling in the chapel in the morning ; and 
when they come from their work, to assemble in the school- 
rooms. 

In conjunction with the overseers of the workshops, and by 
a just and equal division of these duties, to be approved by 
the Superintendent, the Teachers shall have charge of the boys' 
recreations, take charge of them at their meals, and have 
charge of them during the night. 

The Teachers shall assist in the Sabbath School and in vocal 
music, and the principal Teacher shall act as librarian to the 
boys. 

Overseers of the Workshops. 

Sec. 10. The overseers of the workshops shall take charge 
of all tools, apparatus, stock, and materials, furnished or used 
in the shops, aud see that the same are carefully preserved, 

2 



18 

worked with prudence and economy, and properly manufac- 
tured. They 6ball keep accurate accounts of the number of 
boys and time employed each day, of the work done, and of 
all articles made and how disposed of. They shall attend to 
the cleanliness, warming and ventilation, and keep a daily 
record of the temperature of their workshops. They shall have 
charge of the boys during work hours, in the shops ; shall ex- 
ercise a prudent and judicious oversight, see that industry and 
good order are constantly observed, and return them to the 
yard, or such other place as may be appointed by the Super- 
intendent, at the ringing of the bell at the close of work. 
They shall see that the boys are furnished with shoes properly 
fitted. 

In conjunction with the Teachers, they shall have the over- 
sight of the boys' recreations, take charge of them during 
their meals, and after they retire at night. They shall also 
assist the Teachers, if requested, in their duties on the Sabbath 
and in the Sabbath School. 

Watchmen. . 

Sec. 11. The Superintendent shall have power, with the 
approbation of the Executive Committee, to appoint one or 
more Watchmen for night duty, whenever it is considered ne- 
cessary for the safety of the Institution. 

The Watchman on duty shall perform a regular patrol 
throughout and around the buildings, for the purpose of using 
due vigilance of all occurrences, to prevent escapes, and to 
discover and prevent danger from fire. He shall use the ut- 
most vigilance to guard against damage by fire, and promptly 
notify the Superintendent on the first cause of alarm. He 
6hall ring the bell in the morning, and at other times, as may 
be directed, and perform any other service required by the 
Superintendent. 

The Farmer. 

Sec. 12. The Farmer shall have charge of all the farming 
operations, and shall be responsible for the proper manage- 



19 

ment, good order, and economical use of everything connected 
therewith. He shall carry forward all designated improve- 
ments, shall have charge of all the help, and the boys employed 
on the farm, and shall be responsible for the labor and conduct 
of the same daring the. hours of work. Every evening he 
shall inform the Superintendent of what work he intends shall 
be done by the boys on the following day, and the place or 
places where they are to be employed, that in assigning boys 
to the work, proper regard may be had to their age, character, 
qualifications and exposure, and that such assignments may be 
made as will most effectually guard against escapes, and secure 
the best advantage from their labor. He shall have charge of 
the boys while thus employed, shall receive and return them 
punctually as required by the Superintendent, and see that the 
rules of the Institution respecting their discipline are strictly 
observed while they are under his care. 

He shall cause all supplies, and whatever else may be re- 
quired for the Institution, to be drawn by the teams of the 
farm, and shall perform any other labor or services with, men, 
boys or teams, at the request of the Superintendent, when not 
inconsistent with his duties upon the farm. He shall keep an 
accurate account of the labor performed, and of every kind of 
produce raised or furnished on the farm. He shall see that all 
rules and regulations of the Institution are strictly observed 
by all persons under his care, and shall promptly report to the 
Superintendent any one who may refuse or neglect to comply 
therewith. In no case shall he be absent from the premises 
without the knowledge and consent of the Superintendent. 

The Library. 

Sec. 13. It is necessary that a Library of well-selected book3 
and maps, and of Sunday School books, should be kept at the 
State Keform School, for the use and improvement of the delin- 
quents, and it is thought proper to solicit donations for the sup- 
ply and increase of such Library. 

The Superintendent, the Librarian, and Chairman of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee, shall be a Standing Committee on the Li- 



20 

brary, who shall have in charge the efforts, ways and means 
to promote this department of the Institution, and they shall 
report to the Board of Trustees, at their quarterly meetings, 
the progress and condition of the Library, with a. full list of 
all donations received for this object. 

General Regulations. 

Sec. 14. The distribution of time for each working day 
shall be from six to eight hours for labor, four hours for school, 
not less than nine hours for sleep, and five hours to devotional 
exercises, incidental duties, and recreations. 

The time of rising in the morning shall be at five o'clock, 
from the first of March to the first of November, and at six 
o'clock during the other four months. 

The time of retiring shall be at eight o'clock, from the first 
of November until the first of March, and at eight and a half 
o'clock the remainder of the year. 

All persons having requisite duties to perform shall rise at 
the ringing of the morning bell. 

No lights shall be used in any of the outbuildings, the cel- 
lars, workshops, dormitories or laundry, without being enclosed 
in glass or in a lantern. 

No spirituous liquors or intoxicating drink shall be brought 
to the Institution, unless by order of the Physician. No officer 
or assistant shall at any time make use of such liquor, nor shall 
any one make use of tobacco, or smoke a pipe or ci^ar on or 
about the premises. 

No tobacco shall be furnished or allowed to the delinquents, 
in any form. 

No person regularly employed at the Institution shall be 
absent from his duties, without permission from the Superin- 
tendent or the Executive Committee. 

All persons employed at the Institution, in whatever capacity, 
are required to devote their whole attention to the performance 
of their respective duties, which are enjoined in these by-laws, 
or required by the Superintendent. 

Each officer should feel it incumbent on him to see that all 
the rules and regulations are strictly observed, and should 



21 

promptly report any failures therein. As the great object is 
reform, the intercourse of all with boys should be so con- 
ducted as to convince them that this object is the chief end 
and aim of the Institution. ' 

Sec. 15. Every boy shall, at all times, be in charge of 
some responsible person, unless otherwise directed; and that 
person shall be held responsible for the safe keeping until 
returned into the house or yard, or intrusted to the care of 
another person duly authorized. 

No officer shall permit any boy to examine his keys, or to 
pass out of the yard, without permission from the Superinten- 
dent. 

No person shall take or detain a boy from the performance 
of one duty to discharge another, without direction from the 
Superintendent. 

The teachers or overseers having charge of the boys during 
their time of recreation, shall see that a kiud and proper tone 
of feeling is observed among them, and that they do not use 
violence, or injure each other's clothing, or mark or deface the 
buildings, fixtures, or furniture. 

All persons employed at the Institution, who are in health 
and can leave their appropriate duties at the time, shall attend 
the daily devotional exercises and the religious services on the 
Sabbath, unless special leave of absence is granted. 

No officer shall be compelled to perform any duty inconsis- 
tent with those regularly assigned to him ; but as this Institu- 
tion is to be a family, as well as a school for detention and 
reformation, duties will occur growing out of this double 
relation, which no by-laws can clearly indicate or provide for; 
therefore, all must be expected to act agreeably to the spirit as 
well as the letter of these rules and regulations, by holding 
themselves ready at all times for any emergency, and by general 
and constant acts of accommodation, firmness, and kindness, 
accomplish the desired object. 

Punishment for Misconduct. 
Sec iG. If any delinquent shall neglect or refuse to obey 
the orders of the Superintendent, or other officer having 



22 

charge over him, or shall neglect or refuse to perform the 
labor or duty assigned him. or shall strike or resist an officer, 
or shall willfully or by gross negligence or carelessness injure 
any property of the Institution, or shall strike or otherwise 
abuse a fellow-delinquent, or shall be guilty of using indecent 
or profane language, or shall attempt to escape, or shall know- 
ingly be guilty of any violation of the rules of the Institution 
or of good order, he nhall be punished, either by the officer 
having charge at the time the offense is committed, or by the 
Superintendent, or under his direction. 

In cases of a combination among the delinquents to resist 
the authority of the officers, and in flagitious cases of willful 
offenses, punishment shall be promptly administered. In other 
cases great forbearance and caiuion should be observed, but 
some punishment should follow the commission of every offense 
of a serious character. 

With regard to minor offenses and indiscretions, gentle ad- 
monition and reproof should be adopted. 

In all cases, care should be taken to impress the delinquents 
with the conviction that the object in administering punish- 
ment is to subdue their vicious passions, and to promote their 
welfare individually, and secure the good of the Institution, 
and at the same time to convince them beyond a doubt that 
discipline and good order will be maintained at all hazards. 

For the first offense the punishment should be as light as the 
end to be attained by it will allow. In cases of repetition of 
the offense, or oft-repeated transgression, the punishment 
should be increased in severity. 

Punishment may be inflicted by the deprivation of amuse- 
ment and recreation, by withholding some favorite articles of 
food, or some privilege or indulgence, by loss of rank and 
standing in the class, by imposing some irksome dnt} T , by close 
or solitary confinement for a limited period, and when it be- 
comes absolutely necessary to maintain good order and enforce 
the rules and regulations of the Institution, by corporeal 
infliction by the Superintendent or under his direction. 

These by-laws, or any part thereof, may be altered, amended, 
or repealed at any regular meeting of the Board of Trustees. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Reform School : 

This thirteeth annual report shows the whole number con- 
nected with the Institution since its opening, March, 1854, 



to have been 


. 


. 827 


Number at the date of the last report, 


203 


Number received from March 31, 1864, 


to April 


1,1865: 


Hartford County, 




. 26 


New Haven County, 


* 


42 


New London County, 




. 12 


Middlesex County, 


. 


11 


Tolland County, 




. 2 


Windham County, 


. 


4 


Fairfield County, 




. 20 


Litchfield County, 


. 


4 


Boarders, 




. 13 


Returned, 


• 


7 


Total received the past year, 




. 141 


Total number during the year, 


. 


344 


Discharged in various ways, 


• 


. 117 



Leaving in the Institution, April 1st, 1S65, 227 

The foregoing table shows that our number the past year 
has been greater than ever. 

The number received and the number discharged are about 
the same as last year ; but the average number is a little 
greater. 



24 

We have not been able to receive tin's year all of the boys 
that would have been sent, had the school not have been so 
full. Quite a number of boys in New Haven have been sent 
to jail because we could not take them. We have refused 
none from the counties or towns which have the least here, 
and have tried to do justice by all parts of the State. The 
highest number at any one time has been 234. This crowds 
us too much. We ought not at any time to have over 220, and 
a less number would be desirable ; but if we had accommoda- 
tions for five hundred there is not a doubt but that the State 
would avail themselves of every foot of the room here. The 
year has passed very pleasantly. 

The schools have gone on successfully: labor has been 
plenty, with the exception of the past month ; health has 
prevailed, and sickness has been rare ; and we begin the new 
fiscal year under a deep sense of gratitude for all our mercies. 

Our farming operations have been conducted with the usual 
skill and vigor, and -our labor in that department has been 
abundantly rewarded. The severe drought of the past sum- 
mer affected some of our crops, so that the general yield was 
not as large, but there were no failures. The potato crop suf- 
fered the most. The hay was of excellent quality, and a large 
crop. Corn, average. Apples, none of consequence. The 
grapes were very fine, and an abundant yield. 

In the house we made hoop-skirts till October, then we put 
all our force on chair seats, and since, that has been our princi- 
pal business, and will continue to be. 

A reference to the tables will show tho result of the labor in 
each department. 

The hours allotted to labor and school are the same as here- 
tofore, and with the same good results. 

The Sabbath School is attended with much interest, and 
conducted by our own teachers and others from the village. 
The regular Sabbath exercises, conducted by the ministers 
from the village, have been regularly attended, and we antici- 
pate much good from them. Quite a religious interest lias 
been manifested, and there are many blossoms which give 
promise of fruit. 



25 





TABLE I, 






Showing "Whence Received. 








Hartford County. 






TOWNS. 


PAST YEAR. 


PREVIOUSLY. 


TOTAL. 


Bristol, . 


. 1 


5 


6 


Berlin, 





4 


4 


Canton, . 


. 


2 


2 


Enfield, 


2 


5 


7 


East Windsor, 


. 


2 


2 


Farmington . 





5 





Gran by, . 


. 


2 


2 


Glastenbury, 





1 


1 


Hartford, 


. 14 


98 


112 


Manchester, . 


2 


3 


5 


New Britain, 


. 2 


25 


27 


Rocky Hill, 


1 


3 


4 


Simsbniy, 


. 1 


1 


2 


Southington, 


1 


2 


3 


Windsor Locks, 


. 


6 


6 


West Hartford, . 





2 


2 


Windsor, 


. 


2 


2 


Wethersfield, 


2 

New Haven County. 





2 


Cheshire, . 


. 


1 


1 


Derby, 


5 


5 


10 


East Haven, 


. 1 


6 


7 


Hamden, 


3 


1 


4 


Meriden, 


. 5 


24 


29 


Milford, 





8 


8 


Madison, . 


. 


2 


2 


New Haven, 


19 


137 


156 


Nau gat iick, . 





2 


2 


Seymour, 





3 


3 



26 



T0WN8. 


TAST YEAR. 


PREVIOUSLY. 


TOTAL. 


Southbuiy, . 





1 


1 


Waterbury, 


. 5 


11 


16 


Wolcott, 





2 


2 


AVallingford, . 


. 4 

New London County. 


2 


6 


Bozrab, 





1 


1 


Colchester, 


. 3 


3 


6 


East Lyme, 





1 


1 


Groton, . 


. 


2 


2 


Norwich, 


5 


35 


40 


New London, 


. 3 


21 


24 


Preston, 





1 


1 


Stonington, 


. 1 


7 


8 


TVaterford, . 



Fairfield County. 


1 


1 


Bridgeport, 


. 4 


53 


57 


Brookfield, . 





2 


2 


Dan bury, 


. 4 


17 


21 


Darien, 


1 





1 


Easton, 


. 


1 


1 


Fairfield, 


1 


9 


10 


Greenwich, 


. 2 





2 


Huntington, 


1 





1 


Newtown, 


. 


2 


2 


Norwalk, 


5 


20 


25 


New Canaan, . 


. 


1 


1 


Stratford, 





4 


4 


Stamford, 


. 2 


11 


13 


Wilton, 



Litchfield County. 


1 


1 


Cornwall, 





1 


1 


Bethel, . 


. 


4 


4 



27 



TOWNS. 

Harwinton, . 


PAf 


>T YEAR. 



PREVIOUSLY. 

2 


TOTAL. 

2 


Litchfield, 


. 





1 


1 


Morris, 


. 





1 


1 


New Hartford, 


.... 





1 


1 


New Milford, 


.... 


1 


2 


3 


Plymouth, 


... 


2 


4 


6 


Sharon, 


. 





3 


3 


Salisbury, 


. 





1 


1 


Washington, 


.... 





2 


2 


Watertown, 


. . 





1 


1 


Winchester, 


• • . 





1 


1 


Woodbury, 


. 


1 


3 


4 




Middlesex County. 






Clinton, . . 


.... 





1 


1 


Cromwell, 


.... 





1 


1 


Chester, 


.... 





2 


2 


Durham, 


.... 





1 


1 


Deep River, 


. 





2 


2 


Essex, 


. . . 


1 





1 


Killingworth, 


.... 





1 


1 


Had dam, 


.... 


1 


1 


2 


Middletown, 


.... 


9 


u 


23 


Portland, 


• • 





1 


1 


Saybrook, 


Tolland County 





2 


2 


Coventry, 


.... 


1 


5 


6 


Ellington, 


.... 





1 


1 


Hebron, . 


.... 





3 


3 


Stafford, 


.... 





1 


1 


Tolland, . 


. 


1 


3 


4 


Vernon, 


. 





11 


11 




Windham County. 






Ashford, . 


. 





1 


1 


Brooklyn, 


.... 


1 


1 


2 



TOWNS. 

Chaplin, 
Killingly, 
Plain field, 
Sprague, 
Windham, 
Woodstock, . 

Boarders, 



PAST YEAR. PREVIOUSLY. TOTAL. 



Total, 



1 





1 





6 


6 





4 


4 


2 





2 





4 


4 





4 


4 


. 13 


30 


43 



134 



693 



827 



TALE 2, 

Showing the age of hoys at date of commitment. 



AGE. 

Seven, . 

Eight, 

Nine, . 

Ten, 

Eleven, 

Twelve, 

Thirteen. 

Fourteen, 

Fifteen, 



Totjil, 



PAST YEAR. PREVIOUSLY. TOTAL. 



1 


7 


8 


2 


10 


12 


6 


25 


31 


24 


• 98 


122 


20 


90 


110 


25 


107 


132 


16 


112 


128 


21 


122 


143 


19 


122 


141 



134 



693 



S27 



TABLE 3, 








Showing parentage and 


nativity. 






PAST YEAR. PREVIOUSLY. 


TOTAL. 


Born in Ireland, .... 


7 


51 


58 


" Scotland, 


1 


3 


4 


u France, .... 





1 


1 


" England, .... 
" German}', .... 
" West Indies, 


1 





21 

7 
2 


22 
7 
2 



PAST TEAR. PREVIOUSLY. TOTAL. 



Born in New Brunswick, . 


. 


1 


1 


(I 


Nova Scotia, . 





1 


1 


a 


Canada, 


. 


3 


3 




Total, Foreigners, . 


9 


90 


99 


Born in Connecticut, 


. 103 


479 


582 


<< 


Massachusetts, . 


5 


28 


33 


' (< 


Rhode Island, 


. 2 


6 


8 


u 


Vermont, 







2 


u 


New York, . 


. 8 


69 


77 


u 


North Carolina, 


1 


2 


3 


a 


New Hampshire, 


. 1 





1 


u 


Pensylvania, 


1 


5 


6 


u 


Maryland, . 


. 


3 


3 


a 


Ohio, . 





3 


3 


u 


Indiana, 


. 1 


2 


3 


« 


Illinois, . 


1 





1 


u 


Iowa, .... 


. 


1 


1 


Cf 


Wisconsin, 





1 


1 


u 


District of Columbia, . 


. 


1 


1 


(• 


New Jersey, 


1 


1 


2 


U 


Florida, 


. 1 





1 



Total born in the United States, . 125 602 728 

Total, ... 134 693 827 

Of those bom in America, 246 are of Irish parentage, 2 of 

Scotch, 15 of German, 2 of French, and 13 of English. Of 

the whole number, 70 are colored. 



TABLE 4, 
Showing for what offenses committed. 



Theft, 
Burglary, 
Vagrancy, 
Stubborness, 



PAST YEAR. 


PREVIOUSLY. 


TOTAL. 


. 90 


462 


552 


8 


23 


31 


. 5 


49 


54 


3 


46 


49 



30 



PAST TEAR. PREVIOUSLY. TOTAL. 



Cruelty to animals, . 


• . i 





2 


a 


Sabbath breaking,' 


. . . 





1 


1 


Malicious mischief, . 


• . • 


4 


10 


14 


Assault and battery, 




2 


13 


15 


Breach of peace, 


. 





9 


9 


Horse stealing, 


. . 


1 


2 


3 


Disorderly conduct, 


. 





9 


9 


Trespass, 


. 


1 


3 


4 


Forgery, . 


. , 





2 


2 


Assault, 


• • • 


3 


23 


26 


Arson, 


. . . 


3 


6 


9 


Profane cursing and. swearing, 


1 


1 


2 


Common drunkard, . 


. . . 





1 


1 


Fornication, 


. . 





1 


1 


Boarders — no offense 


specified, 


13 


30 


43 


Total, . 


TABLE 5, 


134 


693 


827 



Showing hy what authority committed. 



Hartford Superior Court, 
New Haven " " 
Fairfield " g . 

Litchfield " «' . . 
Middlesex ".<.:" • 

Tolland « " . . 

New London " " . 

Windham " <k 
Hartford Police Court, 
New London Police Court, 
Norwich Police and Justice Court, 
New Haven Justice Court, . 
Bridgeport " 

Justice Court, various towns, 
Boarders, .... 

Total, . 



PAST YEAR. 


PREVIOUSLY. 


TOTAL. 


1 


19 


20 


. 2 


20 


22 


2 


23 


25 


. 


2 


2 





1 


1 


. 


2 


2 


3 


3 


6 


. 


2 


2 


14 


90 


104 


. 3 


21 


2i 


5 


35 


40 


19 


123 


142 


. 4 


53 


57 


68 


2i>y 


337 


. 13 


30 


43 



134 



093 



827 



31 



TABLE 6, 

Showing length of sentence. 



PAST YEAR. PREVIOUSLY. TOTAL. 



During minority, 
Till IS years of age, 
For less than 1 year, 
For 1 year, . 
For 1 year and 6 months, 
For 2 years, 
For 3 " . 
For 4 " 

For 5 "."... 
For 6 * 
ForT " . 
For 8 " 
For 9 " . 
For 10 " . 

Boarders, 



9 


196 


205 





3 


3 


11 


25 


36 


8 


36 


44 


1 


16 


17 


. 21 


108 


129 


37 


120 


157 


9 


44 


53 


20 


65 


85 


2 


22 


24 


2 


14 


16 


1 


1Q 


11 





2 


2 





2 


2 


13 


30 


43 



Total, 



134 



693 



TABLE 7, 



827 



Showing the various ways by which the boys have left the In- 
stitution. 



PAST YEAR. PREVIOUSLY. TOTAL. 



Indentured to Farmers, 

" " various Trades, . 

Sentence expired, 

Discharged as reformed, . 
" to go to sea, 

" to go into the army, 

" to Selectmen, 

" on parole of honor, 

" for defective mittimus, 

" by Superior Court, 

" by Legislature, 

" by order of Court, 






47 


47 





24 


24 


24 


134 


158 





14 


14 





2 


2 





26 


26 





1 


1 


24 


46 


70 


1 


4 


5 





1 


1 





3 


3 





2 


2 



32 



PAST YEAR. PREVIOUSLY. 



Returned to parents or friends, 


49 


116 


165 


Remanded to alternate sentence, . 


1 


12 


13 


Boarders left, . 


11 


20 


37 


Escaped, 


6 


41 


47 


Died, 


1 


8 


9 


Total, . 


117 


507 


G24 


TABLE 8, 









Shows something of the social and moral condition of the hoys 
at the time of their committal. Boarders are not included 
in this table. 



PAST YEAR. 


PREVIOUSLY. 


TOTAL. 


Whole number received, 


121 


663 


784 


Who have lost fathers, 


34 


168 


202 


11 " mothers, 


19 


97 


116 


" " both parents, 


5 


60 


6 S 


Whose fathers were intemperate, 


20 


236 


256 


" mothers " 


5 


34 


39 


Were mostly idle previous to admission 


,50 


439 


489 


Were untruthful, 


100 


575 


675 


" profane, .... 


91 


529 


620 


" truants, .... 


71 


554 


625 


Had visited theaters, 


30 


248 


278 


" used tobacco, 


27 


247 


274 


" been arrested once before, 


15 


166 


1S1 


" " twice, 


1 


28 


29 


" " three times, 


2 


15 


17 


" *• four times or more 


i o 


17 


17 


Irregular at Church and Sabbath 








School, ..... 


50 


417 


467 


Were never connected with any 








Sabbath School, 


30 


113 


143 


Had never attended any School, 


4 


19 


23 



* 



38 



TABLE 9, 



Shows the present attainments of the hoys in their School 
studies. Time devoted to study, Jive hours. Number of 
teachers, four. 

Whole number in school, .».».. 227 

Read in books generally, 108 

11 easy lessons, . . v . . . .90 

Can scarcely read, 29 

Study geography, . . 100 

" written arithmetic, 100 

" mental " 140 

Have been through Greenleaf s Common School Arithmetic, 16 
" to compound interest, .... 15 

u to decimal fractions, 20 

" to reduction, 18 

" to United States money, . . . .16 

" to division, 15 

Study grammar, 17 

Natural philosophy, 15 

Can write letters to their friends, 109 

TABLE 10, 

Showing articles made in Sewing Shop. 

No. of Coats, . 387 

" Pants, 300 

" Shirts, 382 

" Caps, 456 

" Tests, 5 

" Pairs of Suspenders, 382 

" Farmers' Frocks, 22 

" Carpets, 4 

" Pillow Cases, 9 

" Quilts, 91 

" Sheets, 28 

" Horse Blankets,. ...... 2 

" Napkins, 12 

3 



34 

To those friends who have kindly remembered us, we return 
our hearty thanks. The following, among many favors,*we 
would especially record : 

Mrs. L. II. Sigourney, Hartford, Thanksgiving dinner. 
Mrs. L. II. Sigourney, for Christmas dinner, . . $10.00 

Hawes & Smith, Hartford, «• " 5.00 

Bolles, Sexton & Co., " " "... 5.00 

G. W. Goodsell, New Haven, " " 10.00 

Cowles & Leete, " 5.00 

W. B. Johnson, " .... 5.00 

Bushnell & Co., " 5.00 

A. Andrews, Meriden, 3.00 

The Editors and Proprietors of the following Weeklies have 
continued to supply the boys with fresh and instructive read- 
ing : 

11 Religious Herald," " Christian Secretary," " Press," and 
" Conrant," Hartford. 

" Palladium," " Journal and Courier," and " Register," 
New Haven. 

"Norwalk Gazette," "Norwich Aurora," "The Constitu- 
tion," and " Sentinel and Witness," Middletown ; " Iowa Re- 
publican," " Meriden Recorder," and the " Circular " from 
the Wallingford Community." 

Henry A. Nash, second-hand books, ... 10 vols. 
Mrs. L. H. Sigourney, books for Library, . . 10 " 

E. II. Shnmway, 2 " 

Hon. L. F. S. Foster, Public Documents, . . 5 

Hon. J. E. English, " " . . 3 

Anson F. Fowler, set of " Mitchell's Outline Maps," 

second-hand. 
The additions to the Library by purchase, . . 64 



u 



(( 



35 



Chair Shop. 

To Cash paid for stock, 
" Expense of shop, .... 

" Cane and seats on hand, March 31, 1864, 
" Due for seats, .... 

li Fixtures and tools, 
" Cash paid for freight, 



By Ca6h received for seating chairs, 
" Due for seats, March 31, 1865, 
" Cane on hand, u " 

" Fixtures and tools. 



Dr. 

$10,075.26 
500.00 
1074.10 
923.82 
110.00 
400.00 

$13,173.18 

Cr. 

$15,217.12 

119.11 

1,599.90 

200.00 



Avails of Boys' labor in Chair Shop, 
Number of Seats caned, . . 47,741 

" Backs u . . 5,712 

" Settees " . . 127 



$17,136.13 
4,052.95 



Total, . . . 53,580 

Avails of Boys' labor in Skirt Shop, 5 months, . 

TABLE 11. 

Amount and Value of Farm Products. 
45 tons of English hay, at $25, 



8 


" Meadow hay, at $15, 


7 


" Corn fodder, at $12, 


4 


" Oat straw, at $18, 


2 


14 Eye straw, at $20, 


n 


" Barley straw, at $15, . 




Hay and straw for litter, 




Feed for soiling, 



800.00 



1,125.00 
120.00 
84.00 
72.00 
40.00 
22.50 
25.00 
50.00 



36 



258 


bushels 


of corn, at $1.75, 


451.50 


170 


a 


oats, at $1, 


170.00 


36 


u 


buckwheat, at 81-50, 


54.00 


324 


« 


rye, at $2, . 


65.00 


36 


U 


barley, at Si. 75, 


63.00 


17 


<( 


broom corn seed, at 75 cts. 


12.75 


7 


u 


peas, at $3, 


21.00 


28 


(i 


beans, at $2.75, . 


77.00 


42 


(t 


green peas, at §1.50, 


63.00 


474 


n 


otatoes, at 75 cts. 


355.50 


27 


« 


small potatoes, at 3TJ cts. 


10.12 


2051 


u 


turnips, at 30 cts. 


615.30 


170 


a 


carrots, at 50 cts. 


85.00 


60 


u 


beets, at 75 cts. 


45.00 


345 


i( 


mangold wurtzel, at 37^ cts. 


129.37 


12 


c< 


onions, at $2, 


24.00 


80 


a 


parnsnips, at $50, 


40.00 


1000 cabbages, at 5 cts. .... 


50.00 


32 boxes of strawberries, at 30 cts. 


9.60 


7 bushels of currants, at $2. 


14.00 




u 


grapes, at ... 




75 


u 


sweet corn, at $1, 


75.00 


12 barrels of apples, at $2, . 


24.00 


2 


yearling heifers, 


50.00 


10 


pigs, $5 


6, 4 shoats, $100, . 


156.00 


3 breedin 


gsows, . 


90.00 




Poultry 


and eggs, .... 


50.00 


2730 


pounds 


of beef, 


271.50 


1519 


(i 


veal, .... 


139.14 


3302 


u 


pork, . 


5S5.32 


6263 


gallons 


of milk, at 24 cts. 


1503.12 




Broom 


brush, . 


36.00 




Garden 


products, . ... 


100.00 




Preparing wood for fuel, 


96.00 


32 


cords of wood, at $7, 


224.00 




Labor of men, boys, and teams, 


189.15 



$7,4S2.87 



37 

TABLE 12. 

Inventory of Stock and Tools on hand April 1st 1865. 

1 yoke of oxen, ..... $350.00 
11 cows, 630.00 

4 heifers, 180.00 

2 calves, . . . . . 50.00 
1 thorough-bred Durham bull, (Gen. Grant,) . 200.00 
4 breeding sows, .... 115.00 

4 shoats, 100.00 

Poultry, 50.00 

3 ox carts, $100 ; 3 sleds, $45 ; 5 wheelbarrows, $15, 160 

1 " Allen mower," $130 ; 1 mower, $20 ; 1 iron 

roller, $50, . . . . 200.00 

5 plows, $50 ; cultivator, $3 ; horse hoe, $5, . 58.00 

2 harrows, $12 ; corn-sheller, $15 ; fanning mill, $5, 32.00 
1 root cutter, $12; 2 hay cutters, $20 ; 1 horse plow, $6, 38.00 
1 horse hay fork, $12 ; 1 drag rake, $3 ; hay knife, $2, 17.00 

4 chains, $16; '3 iron bars, $12 ; quarry tools, $12, 40.00 
shovels, $6; spades, $2; hoes, $6; bog hoes, $2, 16.00 
hay and manure forks, $15 ; iron rakes, $6, . 21.00 
wood saws, $10 ; crosscut saw. $6 ; saw horses, $5, 21.00 
axes, $9 ; scythes and snaths, $6 ; grain cradle, $5, 20.00 
grindstone, $6; seed sower, $8 ; broom cleaner, $3, 17.00 
stone drag, $1 ; drag planks, $1 ; platform scales, $15, 20.00 
yokes, $10; steelyards, $5; evener and whiffletree, $6, 21,00 
hammers, wrenches, and saws, $6 ; 2 stone ham- 
mers, $4, ..... 10.00 

feed box, $8 ; baskets and pails, $3 ; cards and 

brushes, $2, . . . . 13.00 

picks, $9 ; 2 sets pulleys, $12 ; grain fork, $3 ; 

3 dozen bags, $36, .... 60.00 

$2,439.00 



38 



Produce on hand April 1st, 1865. 



17 tons oi 


' hay, at $30, 


4 


a 


mangold wurtzel, at $1G 


i 

s 


u 


bran, 


li 


u 


straw, at $18, 


t 


u 


carrots, at $20, 


100 bushels of corn, at $1.50, . 


17 


U 


rye, at $1.75, 


40 


u 


oats, at $1, 


4 


a 


barley, 


4 


u 


buckwheat, 


17 


u 


broom corn seed, 


10 


u 


beans, 


« 


u 


peas, 


4 


u 


seed corn, 


li 


il 


timothy seed, 


24 


a ■ 


millet " 


i 


t( 


clover " 


250 


u 


potatoes, at 75 cts. 


30 


CI 


beets, 


20 


M 


parsnips, 


75 


U 


turnips, 



$510.00 

04.00 

38.00 

22.50 

15.00 

150.00 

29.75 

40.00 

6.00 

5.00 

12.75 

37.50 

6.75 

8.00 

7.50 

7.50 

3.50 

187.00 

15.00 

10.00 

37.50 



Farm. 

To Stock and Tools on hand, April 1st, 1864, 
" Produce on hand, " " 

u 3,867 days' work of boys, at 25 cts. 
" Sundries purchased for farm, 

" Board of farmer 37 weeks, at $3, 

" Labor of farmers, 



$1,213.75 



Dr. 

$2,292.50 
952.87 
966.75 
1,052.36 
111.00 
970.00 



$6,345.42 



39 



By Stock and Tools od hand, April 1st, 1865, 
44 Produce " " " 

44 Produce and stock sold, 
44 Labor of men, boys, and teams on permanent 

improvements, . 
44 Sundries furnised Institution, as follows : 
6,263 gallons of milk, at 24 cts. 
2,850 pounds of pork, at 18 cts. 
845 " beef, at 10 cts. 

500 " squashes, 

47 bushels of grain, 



beans, 
potatoes, 
green peas, 
sweet corn, 
turnips, 
onions, 
beets, 
parsnips, 



19 " 
424 
42 

75 

100 44 

12 " 

15 " 

10 u 

600 cabbages, 

All other garden vegetables, 
12 barrels of apples, 
32 boxes of strawberries, 
7 bushels of currants, 
Other small fruits, 
Preparing wood for fire, 
4 tons of straw, 
Poultry and eggs, 
Horsekeeping, 
Labor of men, boys, and teams, 



Cr. 

$2,439.00 
1,213.75 
1,068.32 

126.15 

1,503.12 

513.00 

84.50 

20.00 

47.00 

66.50 

318.00 

63.00 

112.00 

40.00 

24.00 

7.50 

5.00 

30.00 

50.00 

24.00 

9.60 

14.00 

10.00 

96.00 

72.00 

50.00 

300.00 

63.00 

$8,369.94 
6,345.42 



Balance in favor of farm, 



$2,024.52 



40 

I can communicate to you nothing new in regard to the 
crowded state of our house. We ought to have relief in seme 
measure. Motives of sound policy and economy would dic- 
tate that the State should provide in some way to prevent, if 
possible, so much juvenile depravity and crime. That boys 
are more neglected than formerly, is apparent to all. That 
they are not restrained and kept at home ; that there is more 
truancy and vagrancy ; and that young boys are now commit- 
ting crimes which, a few years since, it was supposed that only 
old and hardened offenders would commit, is well known to 
the courts of justice, officers, and to all whose attention is turned 
in ihat direction. 

One of two things is certain : either there must be local 
institutions for juvenile restraint, or the State must enlarge its 
accommodations. 

All of the cities and large towns in the State are constantly 
urging us to receive their boys, and our kindly endeavor to do 
justice by them all, may lead us to do injustice to the boys by 
discharging them too soon, either before their habits are 
formed, or their education is completed. We have had in the 
past year almost or quite one hundred boys whose fathers are 
or have been connected with the army. 

About twenty of these have lost their fathers in the army. 
This feature of the school must commend itself to every Chris- 
tian and patriot ; and these boys, if none others, ought to be 
cared for by the State. 

Some of our boys have given their lives for the country the 
past year, and many others are in the service. The year has 
passed quickly and pleasantly to us. 

There has been entire harmony in the family, and a desire 
to do duty faithfully has characterized all of my assistants, for 
which I am thankful, and to you, gentlemen, for your kindness 
and consideration. 

Ilespectfullj 7 , 

E. W. HATCH, 

Superintendent and Physician. 



42 



TO THE TRUSTEES OF THE STATE 

The Treasurer respectfully presents 
Dr. 

To Balance in his hands, April 1st, 18G4, - $181.11 
To amount from State Treasury for Board of De- 
linquents, ----- 16,291.10 
To Appropriation from State Treasury, - - 1,000.00 
To Cash received from Farm, - - - 1,068.32 
" Shoe Shop, - - 1.62 
" Tailor's Shop, - - 64.03 
" " Chair Shop, - - 15,217.12 
" " Skirt Shop, - - 1,869.94 
" " Incidentals, - - 632.18 
" " Boarders, - - 862.00 



Total Eeceipts, - $37,187.72 



43 



REFORM SCHOOL OF CONNECTICUT. 

the Thirteenth Annual Report !, and is 











Cb. 


By Cash paid for Provisions, - « 


' - 


$8,973.00 


ii 


II 


Farm, - 


- 


1,052.36 


fl 


.11 


Traveling, - 


- 


482.92 


ii 


ft 


Salaries, 


- 


6,472.00 


a 


II 


Books and Stationery, 


506.60 


ii 


II 


Freight, 


- 


709.27 


ii 


H 


Shoe Shop, - 


- 


458.31 


ii 


II 


Clothing, 


- 


3,369.17 


ii 


II 


Chair Shop, 


- 


10,075.22 


ii 


II 


Incidentals, 


- 


435.57 


ii 


II 


Land, 


- 


1,000.06 


ii 


ft 


Furniture, 


- 


428.57 


ii 


ft 


Repairs and Impr 


ovements, 


1,004.80 


ii 


II 


Postage, 


- 


46.37 


ii 


II 


Hospital, 


- 


16.70 


ii 


(( 


Fuel and Lights, 


- 


1,684.07 


ii 


II 


Skirt Shop, - 


- 


3.25 


ii 


" Stable, ■ 
Total Expenditures, 




284.58 




$37,002.82 




Balance 


in Treasury, 


- 


184.90 



E. W. HATCH, Treasurer. 

State Reform School, ) 

West Meeiden, March 31st, 1865. ) 



I have examined the foregoing Treasurer's account, and find 
the same to be correct. 

HIRAM FOSTER, Auditor. 
Meeiden, April 12th, 1865. 



LAWS RELATING TO THE REFORM SCHOOL. 



The following laws relating to commitments to the State 
Reform School, are now in force : 

When any boy under the age of sixteen years, shall be con- 
victed of any offense known to the laws of this State, and 
punishable by imprisonment, other than such as may be pun- 
ishable by imprisonment for life, the Court of Justice, as the 
case may be, before whom such conviction shall be heard, may, 
at their discretion, sentence such boy to the State Reform 
Sehool, or to such punishment as is now provided by law for 
the same offense. 

And if the sentence shall be to the Reform School, then it 
shall be in the alternative to the State Reform School, or to 
such punishment as would have been awarded if this act had 
not been passed. Sec. 4th of " An Act to establish the State 
Reform School," passed 1851. 

All commitments to the Reform School, of boys, of whatever 
age when committed, shall be for a term not longer than dur- 
ing their minority, nor less than ninety days, [the ninety days 
limitation has been altered by subsequent statute,] unless 
sooner discharged by order of the Trustees, as herein provided, 
and whenever any boy shall be discharged therefrom, by the 
expiration of his term of commitment, or as reformed, or as 
having arrived at the age of twenty-one years, such discharge 
shall be a full and complete release from all penalties and dis- 
abilities which may have been created by such sentence. 

Sec. 7 of above act. 

Any Justice of the Peace, before whom any juvenile delin- 
quent may be lawfully committed to the State Reform School, 
may sentence such delinquent during his minority, provided, 
that no Justice of the Pence shall sentence any delinquent as 
aforesaid to said school, for a longer period than ninety days, 



45 

[ninety days' clause altered by subsequent statute,] unless 
upon the recommendation, at the time of such sentence, of a 
majority of the Selectmen of the town in which such convic- 
tion is had. 

Sec. 1 of Act of 1854. 

No person shall hereafter be sentenced or committed to the 
State Reform School for any of the offenses specified in the 
24th and 55th sections of the "Act concerning Domestic Re- 
lations," or the 23d section of the Act concerning Prisons. 
Sec. 1 of the Act of 1855. 

No person under the age of ten years shall hereafter be 
committed to die State Reform School, nor shall any person 
be so committed for a less period than nine months. 
Sec 3 of Act of 1857. 

Any parent may indenture his boy, or any guardian may 
indenture his male ward, to the Slate Reform School, for such 
length of time as may be agreed upon by such parent or guar- 
dian and the Trustees of said State Reform School, on condi- 
tion that such parent or guardian shall pay the expenses of his 
boy or ward, so indentured as aforesaid, while at said State 
Reform School. 

Act of 1859, Sec. 1. 



FORM OF INDENTURE ADOPTED BY THE TRUSTEES. 
To the Trustees of the Connecticut State Reform School : 

I hereby request that the boy named 

be received as indentured according to Law, to the State Re- 
form School, at ^Yest Meriden, and I hereby bind myself and 
agree to the following conditions, viz. : 

The price of board, education, training and clothing for said 
boy shall be at the rate of Three Dollars per week, payable 
quarter-yearly in advance, and the said 

is bound to remain in said Institution for the terra of 
months, entitled to the same supervision, medical 



4G 

treatment, support and education, and subject to the same 
regulations, employment and restraint, as all other inmates of 
said School. 

[Signed.] 



MEETINGS OF THE BOARD. 

The Annual, Quarterly, and Semi-Annual Meetings of the 
Board of Trustees, are holden as follows: 

Annual Meeting, second Wednesday in July. 
Quarterly " " u in October. 

Semi-Annual Meeting, second Wednesday in January. 
Quarterly " " " in April. 



RESOLUTION. 

The following resolution was passed at the January meeting 
of the Board, 1S60, and is considered one of the standing rules 
of the Board: 

Resolved, That we visit the Institution in succession, each 
month in which the regular meetings of the Board do not 
occur. 

The following is the order of counties : 

February — Middlesex County. 

March — Tolland County. 

May — Litchfield County. 

June — New London County. 

August — Hartford County. 

September — New Haven County. 

November — Fairfield County. 

December — Windham County. 



Names, Residence, Commissions and Retirement of the Trustees 
of the State Reform School, from its commencement to the present 
time. 



Date of 
Commission. 


NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Date of 
Retirement. 


1851. 


Gideon Welles, 


Hartford, 


1853. 


1851. 


Philemon Hoadley, 


New Haven, 


1857. 


1-861. 


E. S. Abernethy, 


Bridgeport, 


1853. 


1851. 


A. N.Baldwin, 


New Milford, 


1855. 


1851. 


Philo M. Judson, 


Norwich, 


Declined. 


1851. 


Erastus Lester, 


Plainfield, 


1854. 


1851. 


Henry D. Smith, 


Middletown, 


1853. 


1851. 


John H. Brockway, 


Ellington, 


1853. 


1853. 


Philip Ripley, 


Hartford, 


Died in office, '63 


1853. 


David Pale-hen, 


Weston, 


1854. 


1853. 


John P. Gulliver, 


Norwich, 


1854. 


1853. 


John S. Yeomans, 


Columbia, 


1856. 


1853. 


James Phelps, 


Essex, 


1855. 


1854. 


Frederick S. Wildman, 


Danbury, 


1858. 


1854. 


Moses Pierce, 


Norwich, 


1856. 


1854. 


John Gallup, 2d, 


Brooklyn, 


1858. 


1855. 


Sylvester Spencer, 


Litchfield, 


Resigned, 1858. 


1855. 


Elihu Spencer, 


Middletown, 


Declined. 


1856. 


Moses Culver, 


Middletown, 


1858. 


1856. 


Thomas Clark, 


Coventry, 


1860. 


1856. 


Win. P. Benjamin, 


New London, 


Still in office. 


1857. 


Wm. S. Charnley, 


New Haven, 


Declined. 


1858. 


E. W. Hatch, 


Meriden, 


Resigned, 1859. 


1858. 


Horace Gay lord, 


Ash ford, 


1862. 


1858. 


David P. Nichols, 


Danbury, 


Still in office. 


1858. 


Thomas A. Miller, 


Torringford, 


1859. 


1858. 


Benjamin Douglass, 


Middletown, 


1863. 


1859. 


Hiram Foster, 


Meriden, 


Still in office. 


1859. 


Daniel G. Piatt, 


Washington, 


(< M 


1860. 


Henry McCrea, 


Ellington, 


a a 


'1862. 


Roswell Brown, 


Hartford, 


it u 


1862. 


William Swift, 


Windham, 


U (( 


1863. 


Henry G. Hubbard, 


Middletown, 


Declined. 


1864. 


Benjamin Douglass, 


Middletown, 


Still in office. 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION, 



E. W. HATCH, M. D. 
Superintendent, Treasurer and Physician. 

Teachers. 

SAXTON B. LITTLE, 

Assistant Superintendent and Principal Teacher. 

JOSEPH L. BAEBER, Miss M. A. PORTER, MARY A. 

BUTLER. 

Matron, 



Farm. 
L. P. CHAMBERLAIN, Farmer. 
BELA ANDREWS, Assistant Farmer. 
E. W. LARRABEE, Gardener. 

Mechanical Department. 
J. P. PARKER, W. C. LOOMIS, Chair Department. 
JOHN B. PORTER, Shoe Shop and Boys' Kitchen. 
JOHN TURNER, Tailor. 

Watchman, 
E. n. SIIUMWAY. 






REPORT 



OF THE 



DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



CONNECTICUT STATE PRISON. 



TO THE 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY, 



MAY SESSION, 1865. 



frintor kg ©rto al % folate. 



NEW HA YEN: 
CARRINGTON & HOTCHKISS, STATE PRINTERS. 

1865. 



OFFICERS. 



Directors, 

Marcus Lillie, of Coventry, D. II. Willard, of Newington, 

William K. Peck, Norfolk. 

Warden, 
WILLIAM WILLARD. 

Deputy Warden, 
HORACE FENTON. 

Chaplain, 
Rev. B. C. PHELPS. 

Physician, 
A. S. WARNER, 11 D. 

Clerk, 
WILLIAM A. SPENCER. 

Overseers, 
Josiaii ill wold, Jr., John Fenton, 

Griffith W. Griffiths, Augustus L. Daggett. 

Watchmen, 
Joseph II. Waterman, Edward J. IIanmee, 

David Ives, Loren J. Hasting. 

• 

Gate Keeper, 

JOHN II. PHELPS. 

Matrons, 
Miss Sarah C. Whitaker, Miss A. J. Stevens. 



DIRECTORS' REPORT. 



To the Honorable General Assembly ', May Session, A. D. 
1865: 

The Directors of the Connecticut State Prison, as required 
by the statute, respectfully report : 

That for the first time in the history of this Institution has it 
been necessary for the Warden to call upon the Treasurer of 
the State for funds to meet its current expenses. 

We believe that the people of the State desire the prisoners 
to have an abundant supply of wholesome food, with clothing 
and bedding sufficient to make them comfortable at all seasons 
of the year ; this has been done, though at a large expense, 
compared with years gone by. The expenses the past year 
have been §5,770.96 more than theiucome ; this comparatively 
large deficiency is owing mainly to the great advance in the 
price of provisions, as will be seen by comparing the provision 
account of last year, which was $5,570.68, with the account 
this year, which is $10,242.64 — making a difference of $1,671.- 
96 in this one item alone, with a less number of prisoners than 
last year. The expense account has been somewhat increased 
by a small advance in the pay of the subordinate officers of 
the Prison, and also an increase to the Warden for board of 
the same, both of which are deemed just and expedient. 

The whole number now in confinement is 131, of whom 15 
are United States prisoners, leaving only 116 from our own 
State — a less number than for a long series of years. 

For a more particular account of the financial condition -of 
the Prison, we respectfully refer you to the report of the War- 
den, in which will be found the usual statistical tables; also to 
the reports of the Chaplain and Physician, for the moral and 
physical condition of its inmates. 



We consider that the discipline of the Prison was never bet- 
ter, and has been maintained with less punishment than in 
previous years. This, we believe, is owing in a great mea- 
sure to the action of the Legislature of 1SC2, allowing the 
Warden, with the consent of the Directors, to deduct a certain 
percentage of time from the sentence of the convicts for good 
behavior. It has been an incentive to quite a large number 
of the prisoners to submit cheerfully to the rules and regula- 
tions, and to do well the work required of them. Allow us to 
say in this connection that it gives us great pleasure to report 
the faithfulness of the Warden and his subordinates in their 
constant application to the duties devolving upon them. 

The roofs ot the main building need painting, and some of 
the outer ones need to be newly shingled, and we respectfully 
ask you to make such appropriations as in your judgment is 
necessary. 

We earnestly invite all the members of the General Assem- 
bly to visit the Institution, at any and all times when conven- 
ient, at your ensuing Session. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

MARCUS LILLIE, ) 

DANIEL II. WILLARD, } Directors. 
WILLIAM K. PECK, Jk., ) 

Wetheksfield, April 1st, 1S65. 



WARDEN'S REPORT. 



To the Directors of the Connecticut State Prison : 

Gentlemen : — 
The undersigned begs leave to present his annual report of 
the operations of the Prison for the year ending March 31st, 
1865, and its condition at that time. 

The management of the financial department of this, as well 
as most Prisons, the past year, has been attended with unusual 
difficulties ; especially has this been the case with those whose 
policy it has been to let the labor of the convicts at a stipula- 
ted price per diem. This will readily be seen if we look at our 
own case. The contracts having five years to run were all 
made shortly before and soon after the war commenced, and 
before high prices ruled ; but one has expired on which an ad- 
vance could be secured, and that only a few months since. 
Our income could not therefore be materially increased, while 
the extravagant price of every article consumed must add 
largely to our expenses. It will be observed, by comparing 
this with my last report, that while the earnings of the Prison 
are but $380.20 larger than last year, the expenses are $5,493.- 
89 larger. In addition to these difficulties we have labored 
under the disadvantage of greatly reduced numbers. It 
should be borne in mind that the cost of fuel, lights, officers, 
and in fact for nearly everything except food, clothing, and 
bedding, is the same for 100 as for 200, while the earnings of 
the latter are double that of the former. Early in the season 
I agreed with the Secretary of the Navy to take the Naval 
Prisoners to the number of 100 at $1.50 per week for board 
and clothing, but after receiving twenty, another institution 
agreed to take them at a less price, and the Secretary sent the 
balance there. 



G 

The deportment of the prisoners the past year has been un- 
usually good ; most of them have cheerfully conformed to the 
rules adopted for their government, with an eye no doubt to 
the very liberal bounty offered by the Legislature for merito- 
rious conduct. Under the act referred to, there has been cred- 
ited tbe past year a total 7 days for good conduct. This 
includes the amount credited to life and IT. S. prisoners, and 
is useful to them only in an effort to obtain a pardon or remis- 
sion of part of their sentence. Thirty-nine have had a perfect 
record for every month in the year, and forty-two, whose time 
expired or commenced during the year, have had a perfect 
record for that portion of the year spent here. 

I am indebted to you, gentlemen, as well as to the officers 
generally, for your cordial co-operation during the year that 
is passed. 

The usual statements and tables you will find annexed. 

WM. WTLLAKD, Warden. 
Wetoersfield, March 31st, 18G5. 



INCOME. 

SHOE SHOPS. 
Stock on hand March 31st, 1864, . $ 49.60 
Pay of Overseers, 1,139.03 $1,18S.63 



Received for work done, . . . 9,976.74 

Stock on hand March 31, 1865, . . 56.10 10,032.84 



$8,844.21 
BURNISHING SHOP. 
Stock on hand March 31, 1S64, . . . 10.25 
Pay of Overseer, 377.50 387.75 



Received for work done, . . 3,574.55 

Stock on hand March 31, 1865, . . 12.45 3,587.00 



$3,199.25 
PROFIT AND LOSS. 
Received from visitors, 593.47 

BOARD ACCOUNT. 
Board of United States Convicts, .... 1,199.51 



EXPENDITURES. 

EXPENSE ACCOUNT. 

Stock on hand March 31, 1864, . . $ 4,457.06 
Officers' Salaries, Board of Clerk, Watch- 
men, Gatekeeper, &c, <fcc. f . . 10,504.06 14,961.12 



Sundry credits to this account, . . 2,919.38 

Stock on hand March 31, 1665, . . 4,716.02 7,635.40 

$7,325.72 



PROVISION. 

Stock on hand March 31, 1S64, . . $ 700.45 

Amount since purchased, . . . 11,535.72 $12,236.17 



Sundry credits to this account, . . 1,305.90 

Stock on hand March 31, 1SG5, . . 687.63 1,993.53 



$10,242.64 

CLOTHING AND BEDDING. 

Stock on hand March 31, 1S64, . . 2,072.05 

Amount since purchased, . . . 1,963.57 4,035.62 



Sundry credits to this account, . . 442.50 

Stock on hand March 31, 1S65, . . 2,390.63 2,S33.13 







$1,202.49 


HOSPITAL. 






Stock on hand March 31, 1S64, . 


105.00 




Amount since purchased, . 


. 324.83 




Physician's Salary, .... 


200.00 


629.83 


Sundry credits to this account, . 


. 2.18 




Stock on hand March 31, 1S65, . 


125.00 


127.18 



$502.65 

FEMALE DEPARTMENT. 

Pay of Matrons, $330.55 

Received for work done, .... 2S7.49 43.06 

TRANSPORTATION OF CONVICTS. 

Paid for transportation of convicts from 

the different counties the past year, . $207.52 

INTEREST. 
Balance of Interest, 83.32 







IRT^OAJPZ TUL ATI O IT . 

INCOME. 

Shoe Shops, . . . . . . $8,844.21 

Burnishing Shop, . ' . . . 3,199.25 

Profit and Loss, 593.47 

Board of United States Convicts, . 1,199.51 

Expenses above Income, . . . 5,770.96 $19,607.40 

EXPENDITURES. 



Expense Account, 


. 7,325.72 


Provision, .... 


10,242.64 


Clothing and Bedding, 


1,202.49 


Hospital, .... 


. 502.65 


Female Department, . 


43.06 


Transportation of Convicts, . 


. 207.52 


Interest, 


83.32 



19,607.40 



10 
GENERAL SUMMARY. 



Received from State Treasurer, 


. 


$0,512.63 


" " Fines, 


. 


1.00 


Cash on hand March 31, 1S64, 


. 1,03S.52 




" " u 1S65, . 


14.7S 




Decrease, 


• • • 


1,023.74 


Due from Prison, March 31, 1S61, . 


. 00.00 




" " " 1865, 


130.61 


130.64 



Paid for advertising applicants for pardon, 

by order of General Assembly, . . 8.00 

Paid for Prison Library, by order of Gen- 
eral Assembly, 49.67 

Paid Prisoners' Aid Society, by order of 

General Assembly, .... 338.00 

Paid for Repairs and Improvements, by or- 
der of General Assembly, . . . 5SS.16 

Amount of property on hand 

March 31, 1864, . . $7,394.41 

Amount of property on hand 
March 31, 1865, . . 7,987.83 



$7,668.06 



Increase, 593.42 

Book Accounts March 31, 1S64, $$3.S2 
" " « 1865, 403.67 



Increase, 319. S5 

Expenses above Income, . . . 5,770.96 7,66S.09 






STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Numher of Prisoners in Confinement, March Zlst, 1864, 

Received since, Deaths, Discharges, &c, dec. 
Whole number in confinement, March 31, 

1864, 139 

Since received, 58 



197 



Discharged by expiration of sentence, . . 51 

" " order of General Assembly, . 4 

" " " Secretary of Navy, . 4 

Pardoned by the President, ... 1 

Died, 6 66 



Leaving in confinement, March 31, 1865, . . . 131 
Of this number there are for first offense, . 118 
" " * second " ' . .11 

" " " third " • 2 131 

Number Received from each County. 

Hartford County, 15 Fairfield County, 34 

New Haven " 29 Litchfield « " 15 

New London a 12 Middlesex " 2 

Windham " 1 Tolland " 8 

United States Prisoners, 15 

131 

The Fifty-Eight received during the year ending March Z\st, 

1864, were from 

Hartford County, 2 Fairfield County, 15 

New Haven " 16 Litchfield " 2 

New London " 2 Tolland ' " 1 

United States Prisoners, 20 

58 



12 
Color and 8ex, 



White Males, . 
Colored Males, 
"White Females, 
Colored Females, 



99 

15 

14 

3 



Occupation. 

Females in making and mending clothes, 

cooking, etc., 13 

Picking Hair, Assorting Seeds, &c, . . .4 

Males, making Boots anl Shoes, ... 68 

" Burnishing Silver Plated Ware, . . 24 

General Repairs, 1 

Hospital Nurse, 1 

Lumpers, Waiters, and Out-Door Men, . 10 

Aged, infirm, and crippled, .... 3 

Idiotic, 1 

Insane, 2 

Invalids, 4 

Nativity. 

Americans, 80 

Foreigners, 51 



131 



131 



131 



Connecticut, 


33 


Alabama, 


2 


Massachusetts, 


9 


North Carolina, 


1 


Kew York, 


12 


Louisiana, 


1 


Rhode Island, 


2 


Missouri, 


1 


^"ew Hampshire, 


2 


District of Columbia, 


1 


Maine, 


1 


Ireland, 


31 


New Jersey, 


7 


England, 


13 


Virginia, 


1 


Germany, 


4 


Pennsylvania, 


5 


France, 


1 


Term on t, 


1 


Scotland, 


1 


Maryland, 


1 


West Indies, 


1 



131 








13 






Age. 




Under 20 years, there are 


. 


15 


From 20 to 30 years, 


. 


. GO 


" 30 to 40 " 


. 


29 


" 40 to 50 " . 


. 


. 15 


Over 50 years, 


. 


6 



131 

Prisoners Pardoned by the General Assembly, May Session, 

18G4. 



Names. 

James Egan, 
Lewis Stebbins, 
Margaret McLoughlin 3 
Hazard Welles, 



Nativity. 

Ireland, 
Massachusetts, 
Louisiana, 
Connecticut, 



Crimea. 

Highway Robbery. 
Theft. 
Adultery. 
Attempt to Rape. 



For 1 year, 

2 " 
2 " 

2 " 

3 " 
3 " 
4 
4 
5 
G 
7 



Sentences. 

7 For 8 years, 



and 3 months, 
" 6 " 



22 
1 
4 

17 
1 

13 
1 

13 
5 



" 10 

" 15 
"20 
" 24 
" Life, 
« 10 

U iq u a 

Until further 

orders from 

Superior Court 



and $10 fine, 
" $50 « 



4 

8 
3 

1 
1 
18 
1 
1 



131 



Crimes. 
Acquitted on grounds of insanity, but confined by order of 

Superior Court, 1 

Attempt at Murder, 1 

Adultery, 3 

Arson, 5 

Attempt at Rape, 7 



Assault with intent to Kill, 



2 



14 



Assault with intent to Kill and to commit a Rape, . 

II U H (I (J 

Assaulting Superior Officer, 

Attempt to desert and absence from dut}', . 

" at Rape and stealing from person, 

Burglary, 

Beast iality, 

Burglary and Breaking Jail, 

Breaking Jail and Horse stealing, . 

Desertion, 

Disobedience of Orders, .... 

Drunkenness and Assaulting Superior Officer, 

Forgery, 

Horse-stealing, Theft, and Breaking Jail, . 
ii ii 

" " and Adultery, 

Incest, 

Murder, .... 

" commuted, 

" 2d degree, 
Manslaughter, 
Passing Counterfeit Money, 
Robbing U. S. Mail and Forgery 

Rape, 

Robbery, .... 

Theft,. .... 
Stealing from person, 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

27 
1 
1 
1 

10 
1 
1 
1 

, 1 
7 

, 2 
2 

. 1 
3 

12 
7 
9 
1 
1 
3 

12 



131 



15 



Prisoners under Sentence for Life. 



Names. 


5o 

— — 
> ** 

< s 


Nativity. 


Where 
convicted. 


When 
committed. 


Crimes. 


Benjamin Scott, 


27 


New York, 


Litchfield, 


Sept. 2,1841. 


Att'pt at Murder. 


Lucina Coleman, 


50 


Hartford, Ct., 


Hartford, 


Sept. 25, 1849 


Murder 2d degree 


John Brown, 


35 


Ireland, 


Tolland, 


Nov. 3, 1849 


Murder 2d degree 


Win. 0. Chapin, 


32 


Massachus'tts 


Hartford, 


Feb. 8, 1849, 


Rape. 


Henry Mennasseth 


48 


Farmington, 


Litchfield. 


July 8,1851, 


Murder. 


Win. H. Calhoun, 


20 


Nassau, N. Y. 


Litchfield, 


July 8, 1854, 


Murder. 


Morris Nichols, 


29 


Greenfield,Ct. 


Fairfield, 


March 10, '54, 


Murder 2d degree 


Isaac Randolph, 


45 


Pennsylvania 


X. Haven, 


July 16, 1856, 


Murder 2d degree 


Albert Northrop, 


22 


Wash'gt'n, Ct 


N. Haven, 


Sept. 3, 1856, 


Beastiality. 


Benjamin Roberts, 


40 


New Milford, 


Hartford, 


Dec. 29, 1858, 


Murder 2d degree 


John P. Warren, 


21 


Coventry, Ct. 


Tolland, 


Dec. 14,1859, 


Murder 2d degree 


Curtis Dart, 


52 


Connecticut, 


Litchfield, 


May 10, 1S60, 


Murder 2d degree 


Thomas Wilson, 


50 


Ireland. 


Hartford, 


July 31, I860, 


Murder 2d degree 


James Cuff, 


33 


Ireland, 


Windham 


Nov. 22, 1860, 


Murder 2d degree 


Mort. S. Yidetoe, 


36 


Massachus'tts 


Litchfield, 


Dec. 5, 1S60, 


Murder 2d degree 


Hannah Donnovan 


19 


Watertown, 


LitchfieldJSept. 25, '61, 


Murder 2d degree 


LuciusJ. Woodford 


44 


Winsted, Ct., 


Litchfield, 


April 21, '62, 


Murder 2d degree 


Philip Bossert, 


29 


Germany, iBridgep't, 


Dec. 4, 1863, 


Murder. 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



To the Directors of the Connecticut State Prison : 

Gentlemen : — 
The incorporation of a religious element into an Institution 
of this character is of more importance than a casual observer 
would readily admit. Indeed, I once heard a gentleman ob- 
serve that "the Chaplaincy to a State Prison was a sinecure;" 
a further acquaintance with his philosophy furnished me with 
the secret of his conclusion : for theoretical and experimental 
religion, as taught by the u meek and lowly Nazarene," had 
little affinity with his stoical and unbelieving heart. Could he 
have conversed with scores of men within these somber walls, 
as I have done during the last eight years, he would have seen 
things in a different light, and learned to cherish a nobler sen- 
timent. Men, broken down and dispirited by a sense of their 
guilt and disgrace, have turned away from their troubles to a 
prayerful study of the Word of God, by which they have be- 
come cheerful and happy, aud abundant in their resolutions to 
be useful and better men. If the Gospel of Jesus Christ, 
taught and enforced by the various means ordained by the 
great " Author and Finisher of our faith," fail to reform and 
save men, I ask, what is there in all this wide world, that can 
produce so desirable a result ? Absolutely nothing. A Christ- 
less philosophy may find fault with the rigid morality of the 
great Teacher, but his gospel will ever remain " the power of 
God unto salvation" to all men who believe. 

During the past year, several cases of apparent conversion 
have occurred, and a large number of others have turned their 
attention to the Bible and such other reading as cannot fail, 
through the blessing of God, to terminate in the best of con- 
sequences. Another has expressed his enjoyment by saying 






17 

that he was "happy, soul and body." Others have made 
strong expressions of their determination to live a sober and 
honest life, when they shall have been discharged from cus- 
tody here, and if suitable encouragements are placed before 
them, I trust their resolutions will not prove abortive. Some 
are pursuing a systematic course of study, embracing Arith- 
metic, Geography, Grammar, and even Rhetoric. Every man 
has a slate and pencil in his cell, and most of those who could 
not write, are making commendable proficiency in that im- 
portant branch of learning. Care is taken to keep the men 
supplied with good and useful reading. 

The Library is in as good condition as can be expected from 
the constant hard usage to which it is subjected. I have en- 
deavored to make as much use of the old books as possible 
during the past year, and consequently have expended only 
$57.54 for new ones. 

An unknown friend, becoming much interested in the moral 
and religious welfare of the prisoners, by meeting an ex con- 
vict who had been converted while here, has sent three copies 
of the Witness to my address for one year, for the use of the 
Institution. It is an interesting religious periodical, published 
in New York. 

The Sabbath School, though not large, is attended with good 
success, in which the Warden and Deputy take an interest. 
On the Sabbath, after service in the chapel, I visit all the cells, 
and converse with more or less directly upon the subject of 
their personal salvation, after which I have a service in the 
Female Department, and close the labors of the day by read- 
ing the scriptures and prayer in the Hospital. 

Permit me to express my thanks to the Warden and his offi- 
cers for their kindness to the Chaplain, in the discharge of his 
official duty. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BENJ. C. PHELPS, Chaplain. 

Wethersfield, March 31st, 1865. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 

To the Directors of thr Connecticut State Prison : 

( il NII.KMKN : 

I have to report but a small amount of sickness in the 

>:i for the first half of the Inst year. A colored man (age 

38) died from Bcrofnlous disease May 14th. He had been more 

or less an invalid during the whole period of his confinement, 

about four and a half years. 

Another colored man (age 21) died July 3d of pulmonary 
consumption. 

During the autumn months there was rather more than a 
usual tendency to febrile diseases, and particularly to those of 
an intermittent type. It is proper to add that the same ten- 
dency prevailed in the town outside the Prison, and hence it 
cannot properly be ascribed to any defect in its sanitary con- 
dition. 

February 10th, a man (age 50) died of pulmonary consump- 
tion. He came into Prison with a constitution badly broken 
down by habits of intemperance. He had been the subject of 
disease of the lungs, and partial insanity, during the whole pe- 
riod of his confinement, nearly two years. 

March 1st, a young man (age 26) died of acute inflamma- 
tion of the brain, lie had been under treatment for scrofulous 
disease for a long time, and it appears he had been subject to 
it before his imprisonment. If this constitutional vice was not 
the sole cause of the cerebral disease, it probably went far to 
ensure the fatal result. 

In consequence of great prevalence of small pox in the vi- 
cinity, a thorough vaccination was resorted to in April. Not- 
withstanding, the disease was introduced in Februarj' by a girl 
brought up from New Haven. Only two other cases occurred 
— a thorough re-vaccination being had, and in both there was 



19 

a good vaccine vesicle upon the arm (about the tenth day of 
the vesicle) at the appearance of the disease. One of the 
cases was in a voung man, and was very mild. The other was 
in an old man (72) with a chronic cough and a broken down 
constitution, and although the disease was severe, it promised 
at first to end favorably, but pulmonary disease supervened, of 
which he died March 2d. 

There was one other death remotely caused, perhaps, by 
vaccination. The patient was an old man formerly, as he said, 
subject to erysipelas. His arm became badly swollen, attend- 
ed with a good deal of fever ; but these unpleasant symptoms 
appeared to be subsiding, when the arm took on an erysipela- 
tous inflammation, with very severe constitutional disturbance, 
of which he died March 9th. 

There is at the present time comparatively little serious dis- 
ease in the Prison, and none that promises to terminate badly 
at present. 

I respectfully submit the above report. 

A. S. WAKNEK. 

Wetbeesfield, April 1st, 1865. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL 



OF THE 



STATE OF CONNECTICUT 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



MARCH 31, 1865. 



grinted t)y (dt&tx of the legislate. 



NEW HAYEN: 
CARRINGTON, HOTCHKISS & CO., STATE PRINTERS. 

1865. 



GENERAL HEAD-QUARTERS STATE OF CONNECTICUT. 



Adjutant-General's Office, 

Hartford, April 1, 1865. 

His Excellency William A. Buckingham, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief : 

Sir — I have the honor to transmit herewith the Annual 
Report of this Department for the year ending March 31st, 
1865. 

With the highest respect, 

Your Excellency's obedient servant, 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General. 



REPORT 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 



At the date of my last report to your Excellency the fol- 
lowing organizations from this State were in the service of 
the United States : . 



Organization. 


Period. 


First Commander. 


Date of 
Departure. 


1st Regt. Cavalry, ' 


3 years, 


Judson M. Lyon, 


Feb'y 20, 1862. 


1st Squadron Cavalry, 


it 


William H. Mallory; 


Sept. 1, 1861. 


1 st Regt. Heavy Artil'y, 


u 


Levi Woodhouse, 


June 10, " 


2d " 


it 


Leverett W. Wessells, 


Sept. 15, 1862. 


1st Light Battery, 


" 


Alfred P. Rockwell, 


Jan'y 13, " 


2d " 


t< 


John W. Sterling, 


Oct. 15, " 


5th Regt. Infantry, 


" 


Orris S. Ferry, 


July 29, 1861. 


6th 


tt 


John L. Chatfield, 


Sept. 17, " 


7th 


it 


Alfred H. Terry, 


Sept. 18, " 


8th 


tt 


Edward Harland, 


Oct. 17, " 


9th 


tt 


Thomas W. Cahill, 


Nov. 4, " 


10th 


tt 


Charles L. Russell, 


Oct. 31, " 


11th 


it 


Thomas H. C. Kingsbury, 


Dec. 16, " 


12th 


tt 


Henry C. Deming, 


Feb'y 24, 1862. 


13th 


tt 


Henry W. Birge, 


March 17, " 


14th 


tt 


Dwight Morris, 


Aug. 25, " 


15th " 


<< 


Dexter R. Wright, 


Aug. 28, " 


16th 


tt 


Frank Beach, 


Aug. 29, " 


17th 


tt 


William H. Noble, 


Sept. 3, " 


18th 


tt 


William G. Ely, 


Aug. 22, " 


20th " 


" 


Samuel Ross, 


Sept. 11, " 


21st " " 


tt 


Arthur H. Dutton, 


Sept. 11, " 


29th " (colored,) 


<« 


William B. Wooster, 


March 19, 1864. 



All the above are still in service. The 1st Artillery, 1st 
Cavalry, 1st Battery and Infantry Regiments up to and 
including the 13th, have served out their original term of 
service, their time having expired during the year. The or- 
ganization of each is retained however, as a large majority 
of the original members re-enlisted as veterans, and the 
organizations are now designated as " veteran." 



♦J adjutant-general's report. 

Upon the discharge of those members who had not re-en- 
listed, the following regiments were consolidated, viz: 

9th Etegimenl into a Battalion of 4 companies. 
12th " " " " 

18th " " " 5 " 

Although a number of the original members of the 1st 
Squadron Cavalry (attached to the 2d New York Cavalry) 
re-enlisted, tli«' distinctive organization is not retained, the 
men having been assigned to other companies in the regi- 
ment. 

The 30th Regiment Infantry (colored,) which was in pro- 
cess of formation at date of last report, was not recruited to 
a full regiment. Four companies were tilled to the maxi- 
mum, and were consolidated with the 31st U. S. Colored 
Troops, the organization retaining the latter designation. 

CALLS OF THE PRESIDENT FOR TROOPS. 

At the date of the last annual report the State had credit 
for a large surplus of men furnished over all calls. 

During the year the President has made two additional 
calls for troops. The first on the 18th of July, for five hun- 
dred thousand (500,000) men as follows : 

PROCLAMATION. 

Whereas, by the act approved July 4, 1864, entitled "An act further 
to regulate and provide for the enrolling and calling out the nation- 
al forces, and for other purposes," it is provided that the President 
of the United States may, "at his discretion, at any time hereafter, 
call for any number of men, as volunteers, for the respective terms 
of one, two and three years, for military service," and *that in case 
the quota of (or) any part thereof, of any town, township, ward of 
a city, precinct, or election district, or of a county not so subdivided, 
shall not be filled within the space of fifty days after such call, then 
the President shall immediately order a draft for one year to fill 
such quota, or any part thereof, which may be unfilled." 

And whereas, the new enrollment heretofore ordered is so far com- 
pleted as that the aforementioned act of Congress may now be put in 
operation, for recruiting and keeping op the strength of the armies in 
the field, for garrisons, and such military operations as may be re- 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 7 

quired for the purpose of suppressing the rebellion, and restoring the 

authority of the United States Government in the insurgent States : 

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Linooln, President of the United 
States, do issue this my call for five hundred thousand volunteers for 
the military service: provided, nevertheless, that this call shall be 
reduced by all credits which may be established under section eight 
of the aforesaid act, on account of persons who have entered the 
naval service 'during the present rebellion, and by credits for men 
furnished to the military service in excess of calls heretofore made. 

Volunteers will be accepted under this call for one, two or three 
years, as they may elect, and will be entitled to the bounty provided 
by the law for the period of service for which they enlist. 

And I hereby proclaim, order, and ' direct that, immediately after 
the fifth day of September, 1864, being fifty days from the date of 
this call, a draft for troops to serve one year shall be had in every 
town, township, ward of a city, precinct or election district, or county 
not so subdivided, to fill the quota which shall be assigned to it under 
this call, or any part thereof which may be unfilled by volunteers on 
the said fifth day of September, 1864. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused 
the seal of the United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington, this eighteenth day of July in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty- 

(l. s.) four, of the Independence of the United States the eighty- 
ninth. 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 
By the President, 

"William H. Seward, 

§ Secretary of State. 

Under this call the quota of this State was announced as 
10,121, based upon the enrollment as it stood on the 10th of 
June. 

This number was largely in excess of any quota heretofore 
assigned under a call for the same number of men, and it 
was clear that it arose from the fact that the enrollment had 
been revised and while new names had been added, no ade- 
quate opportunity had been given to erase the names of those 
who were improperly enrolled. 

In order to ascertain to what extent the enrollment was 
excessive the following information was called for. 



ADJUTANT-GENERALS REPORT. 

General Head- Quarters, State of Connecticut 

Adjutant-General's Office, ) 

Hartford, August 8th, 1864. ) 



Ciroulab No. 4. 

To the Selectmen of the Town of 

1. You are requested immediately on receipt of this, to proceed 
to the office of the Provost Marshal of your Congressional District, 
examine the enrollment of your town, and ascertain how many names 
there are on that list, of persons who are improperly enrolled. 

2. Fill out the blank return on the next page of this Circular, 
make oath to it before a Justice of the Peace or Notary Public, and 
forward it to this Office at the earliest possible .moment, and 
within five days. 

3. You are also requested to take early steps to have the names 
of all such persons as are improperly enrolled stricken from the En- 
rollment. Provost Marshals are instructed by the Provost Marshal 
General to afford facilities for the accomplishment of this object. 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General. 

August.. ,1864. 



Statement of the number of persons improperly enrolled in the Town of 
Sub-District No. 

NUMBER. 

1. Over or under age, 

2. Not residents of the Town, 

3. Aliens, 

4. Now in service of the United States, 

5. Permanent physical disability, 

6. Deceased, 

We certify that we have examined the enrollment of the above 
named Town; that we find the above number of persons there en- 
rolled, who are not subject to enrollment for the causes stated. 

) Selectmen of 

Conn. 
Sworn to before me, 18t) 1. 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 9 

This circular was forwarded to the selectmen of the sev- 
eral towns, and in a short time replies, in nearly all cases, 
were received. 

The facts shown by these returns were submitted to the 
War Department with a request from your Excellency that 
opportunity might be given for correction of the enrollment, 
and that the quota of the State might be reduced in proper 
proportion. The Provost Marshal General at once directed 
that the quota should be re-assigned, basing it upon the 
enrollment as it might stand on the 28th of August. This 
gave ten days for corrections. The following circular was 
immediately published : 



General Head- Quarters, State of Connecticut. 
Adjutant-General's Office,^ 
Hartford, Aug. 20th, 1864. j 
Circular No. 5. 

The attention of Selectmen and all persons interested, is again 
called to the importance of taking such steps immediately, as will 
secure the correction of the enrollment. 

By orders of the Provost Marshal General, it is made the continu- 
ous duty of the Boards of Enrollment to revise and correct the enroll- 
ment, and any person may appear before the Board and give such 
information as will secure the proper corrections. 

The names of all aliens, persons now in the service of the United 
States, all who are permanently disabled, over or under age, twice 
enrolled, or not residents of the town, should in all cases where proper 
proof can be furnished to the Board, be stricken from the enrollment. 
Previous to the Draft, a re-assignment of quotas will be made to 
the several Districts and Sub-Districts of Connecticut, based upon 
the corrected enrollment, the benefit of which will result only to those 
towns which promptly avail themselves of this opportunity to see 
that proper corrections are made. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General, 



10 ADJUTANT- GENERAL'S RETORT. 

On the 1st of September, notice of the re-assignment of 



A. A. Pro. Mar. Genl's Office, 
rFOHD, Conn., Sept. 1, 1864 






Brig. Gen. II. J. Mob 

-General of Connecticut, Hartford, Conn. 
General : 

I have the honor to state that the Quotas of the several Congres- 
State, under the call of the President for 
.''GO men, dated July 18, 1864* have been J in accord- 

ance with instructions received from the Provost Marsha] General. 

Tli have been reduced in proportion to the reduction of 

the Enrolment of the several district-, from June 10th t<» A . 
I . inclusive, as foil- 



First District, Quota as reassigned, 


- 2,088 


Second " " " " - 


2,486 


Third " u a u 


- 1,601 


Fourth " " " " - 


2.233 


Total Quota in the State, 


- 8,408 


I am, General, 




Very Respectfully, 




Your Obedient Servant, 




F. D. SEWALL, 




Col V. R. C, A. A. P. M. 


General, 


State of 


Connecticut. 



This quota was distributed to sub-districts as follow- : 

List of Quotas assigned to the Sub-Districts, State of Cojinecticut, 
under the caV of the President for jive hundred thousa/oJ mtn, dated 
July 18, 1864, and based upon the enrollment as revised and corrected 
on the 28th day of August, 1864. 



VOLUNTEER FORCE 



11 



First Congressional District. 



Sub-District. 


Town. 


County. 


Quota. 


No. 1 


Hartford, 


Hartford, 


776 


2 


Suffield, - 


a 


54 


3 


Enfield, 


a 


63 


4 


East Windsor, - 


it 


48 


5 


South Windsor, 


a 


28 


6 


Manchester, 


a 


46 


7 


East Hartford, 


a 


55 


8 


Glastenbury, 


u 


62 


9 
10 


Marlborough, 
Berlin, 


tt 
a 


12 
36 


11 
12 


Rocky Hill, - 
Wethersfield, 


u 
a 


17 
43 


13 
14 


Southington, - 
Farmington, 


a 
a 


52 
42 


15 


Bristol, 


a 


54 


16 


Burlington, 


n 


16 


17 


Canton, 


it 


38 


18 


Avon, 


a 


13 


19 
20 
21 
22 


Simsbury, 
East Granby, 
Granby, 
Hartland, - 


a 
a 
tt 
u 


37 
15 
27 
16 


23 


West Hartford, 


tt 


23 


24 


Bloomfield, 


a 


23 


25 


Windsor, 


tt 


33 


26 


Windsor Locks, - 


a 


26 


27 


New Britain, - 


tt 


87 


28 


Stafford, 


Tolland, 


62 


29 


Union, - 


u 


13 


30 


Willington, 


it 


16 


31 


Vernon, 


a 


69 


32 


Tolland, - 


a 


21 


33 


Somers, 


a 


23 


34 


Ellington, - 


ti 


26 


35 


Mansfield, 


tt 


29 


36 
37 


Coventry, - 
Bolton, - 


tt 

a 


32 

9 


.38 


Columbia, - 


a 


17 


39 


Andover, 


a 


8 


40 


Hebron, 


a 


21 




Total, 


- 


2088 



12 



adjutant-general's report 



Second Congressional District. 



8ub-Dbjtrict. 



No. 1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 



Town. 



New Haven, - 

]> ran ford, - 

Nor tli Branford, 

Bethany, - 

Woodbridge, - 

Cheshire, - 

Wolcott, 

Derby, 

East Haven, - 

Guilford, - 

Hamden, 

Madison, - 

Killingworth, - 

Meriden, 

Southbury, 

Oxford, 

Milford, 

Orange, 

Naugatuck, - 

Middlebury, 

Prospect, 

North Haven, 

Seymour, 

Wallingford, 

Waterbury, - 

Middletown, 

Durham, 

Portland, - 

Cromwell, 

Chatham, - 

Haddam, 

East Haddam, • 

Chester, 

Saybrook, - 

Essex, - 

Old Saybrook, 

Westbrook, - 

Clinton, 

Total, 



County. 



New Haven, 



Middlesex, 
New Haven, 



Quota. 



Middlesex, 



808 
44 
15 
18 
15 
29 
8 
84 
51 
49 
55 
39 
16 
178 
17 
21 
48 
36 
46 
7 
7 
26 
41 
49 
208 
205 
17 
67 
27 
34 
31 
51 
25 
19 
31 
21 
20 
23 

2486 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 



13 



Third Congressional District. 



Sub-District. 


Town. 


County. 


Quota. 


No. 1 


Norwich, 


New London, 


273 


2 


New London, 


u 


163 


3 


Lebanon, 


u 


30 


4 


Franklin, - 


« 


14 


5 
6 


Sprague, 
Lisbon, 


tt 


27 
9 


7 


Griswold, 


it 


33 


8 


Voluntown, 


Windham, 


18 


9 


Preston, 


New London, 


38 


10 
11 


North Stonington, 
Groton, 


« • 


34 

106 


12 
13 


Ledyard, - 
Stonington, - 


u 


23 

110 


14 


Colchester, 


u 


37 


15 


Bozrah, 


it 


11 


16 


Montville, - 


u 


38 


17 


Salem, - 


a 


13 


18 


Waterford, 


a 


45 


19 

20 


East Lyme, - 
Lyme, 




36 

20 


21 


Old Lyme, 


a 


19 


22 
23 


Brooklyn, - 
Killingly, 


Windham, 
u 


32 

77 


24 


Plainfield, - 


a 


57 


25 
26 
27 
28 
29 


Sterling, 
Hampton, - 
Chaplin, 
Canterbury, 
Scotland, 


u 
u 
u 

a 
u 


19 
11 
10 
24 
9 


30 


Windham, - 


a 


62 


31 


Ashford, 


a 


19 


32 


Eastford, - 


u 


18 


33 


Woodstock, - 


u 


52 


34 


Pomfret, - 


u 


24 


35 
36 


Thompson, - 
Putnam, 




49 
41 



Total, 



1601 



14 



adjutant-general's report 



Fourth Coin/rcssional District. 



Bub-District. 


Town. 


Couuty. 


Quota. 


No. 1 


Litchfield, 


Litchfield, 


48 


2 


Goshen, 


tt 


16 


3 


Norfolk, 


a 


21 


4 


Canaan, 


a 


28 


5 


North Canaan, 


u 


28 


6 


Salisbury, - 


u 


45 


7 


Sharon, 


u 


42 


8 


Cornwall, - 


a 


27 


9 


Warren, 


u 


13 


10 


Kent, 


a 


25 


11 


New Milford, 


a 


70 


12 


Bridgewater, 


a 


19 


13 


Roxbury, 


a 


15 


14 


Bethlem, - 


a 


15 


15 


Morris, 


a 


' 10 


16 


Woodbury, 


it 


27 


17 


Watertown, - 


u 


27 


18 


Plymouth, 


a 


52 


19 


Winchester, - 


« 


51 


20 


Barkhamsted, 


a 


20 


21 


Harwinton, - 


u 


21 


22 


Torrington, 


it 


28 


23 


Washington, - 


it 


28 


24 


Trumbull, - 


Fairfield, 


84 


25 


Huntington, - 


« 


21 


26 


Monroe, - - . 


a 


23 


27 


Easton, 


u 


28 


28 


West port, - 


%i 


50 


29 


Weston^ 


a 


19 


30 


Fairfield, - 


tc 


64 


31 


Stratford, 


u 


35 


32 


Newtown, - 


i( 


74 


33 


Norwalk, 


a 


153 


34 


New Canaan, 


« 


47 


35 


Stamford, 


u 


126 


36 


Bethel, 


a 


30 


37 


Ridgefield, 


(« 


33 


38 


Brookfield, 


a 


18 


39 


New Fairlield, 


U 


18 


40 


Sherman, - 


u 


16 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 



1") 



Fourth Congressional District, — Continued. 



Sub-District. 


Town. 


County. 


Quota. 


41 


Danbury, 


Fairfield, 


165 


42 


Greenwich, 


u 


113 


43 


Wilton, 


(t 


31 


44 


Redding, 


u 


37 


45 


Colebrook, 


Litchfield, 


18 


46 


New Hartford, - 


« 


44 


47 


Bridgeport, - 


Fairfield, 


337 


48 


Darien, 


u 


23 



Total, 



2,233 



Before the time for the draft, as ordered by the President 
in his Proclamation, the quota of the State was considerably 
more than filled, but a few of the sub-districts had failed 
to furnish the required number. In these a draft was made, 
but in mo.st cases before the date at which the drafted men 
were ordered to report, the towns filled the quota by volun- 
teers and the drafted men were not held to service. 

On the 19th of December the President called for three 
hundred thousand, (300,000,) additional troops, as follows : 

PROCLAMATION. 

Whereas, by the act approved July 4th, 1864, entitled " An act 
further to regulate and provide for the enrolling and calling out the 
national forces, and for other purposes," it is provided that the 
President of the United States may, " at his discretion, any time 
hereafter,- call for any number of men, as volunteers, for the re- 
spective terms of one, two, and three years, for military service," and 
"that in case the quota, or any part thereof, of any town, township, 
ward of a city, precinct, or election district, or of any county not 
so sub-divided, shall not be filled within the space of fifty days 
after such call, then the President shall immediately order a draft 
for one year to fill such quota, or any part thereof which may be 
unfilled." 

And whereas, by the credits allowed in accordance with the act of 
Congress on the call for five hundred thousand men, made July 
18th, 1864, the number of men to be obtained under that call was 



16 adjutant-general's report. 

reduced to two hundred and eighty thousand ; and whereas the 

operations of the enemy in certain States have rendered it imprae- 

ticable to procure from tlumi their full quotas of troops under said 

call ; and wheiva-. from th" foregoing causes, but two hundred and 

forty thousand men have been pot into the army, navy, and marine 

corps, under Bald call of July 18th, 1864, leaving a deficiency on 

that call of two hundred and sixty thousand, (260,000:) 

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United 

States of America, in order to supply the aforesaid deficiency, and to 

provide for casualties in the military and naval service of the United 

States, do issue this my call for three hundred thousand (300,000) 

volunteers, to serve for one, two, or three years. The quotas of the 

States, districts and sub-districts, under this call, will be assigned by 

the War Department, through the Bureau of the Provost Marshal 

General of the United States ; and " in case the quota, or any part 

thereof, of any town, township, ward of a city, precinct, or election 

district, or of any county not so subdivided, shall not be filled" before 

the fifteenth day of February, eighteen hundred and sixty-five, then 

a draft shall be made to fill such quota, or any part thereof, under this 

call, which may be unfilled on said fifteenth day of February, 1865. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the 
seal of the United States to be affixed. 

Done at the city of Washington, this nineteenth day of December, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred 
(L. S.) and sixty four, and of the Independence of the Uni- 
ted States the eighty-ninth. 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 
By the President. 

William II. Seward, 

Secretary of State. 

9 

The quota of this State under this call has never been 

received at these Head-Quarters. The Provost Marshal 

General announced that the surplus credited to the State on 

former calls would more than fill its quota under this call, 

but the figures of the quota have not been announced. In 

the order for the draft under the above Proclamation, this 

State is exempted. 

On the first day of April, 1865, the State has a surplus of 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 17 

six thousand and eighty-nine (6,089) in three years men, 
without reference to its quota on this last call. A summary 
of quotas and credits is given elsewhere. 



RECRUITING IN THE STATE. 

Nearly all the enlistments during the past year have been 
for regiments in the field, it being judged by your Excellency 
best to keep the old organizations in the most effective con- 
dition, rather than recruit new regiments. 

The General Assembly, at the May Session, 1864, passed 
the following act : 

CHAPTER LVI. 

An Act in addition to an Act entitled "An Act to provide for the 
Payment of a Bounty to Volunteers, and for other purposes," ap- 
proved January 15th, 1864. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in Gen- 
eral Assembly convened: 

Sec. 1. That any person who has been, or may be hereafter, 
enrolled under any law or authority of the United States, and liable 
to be drafted in this State, and who since the first day of June, 1864, 
has furnished, or who may hereafter, previous to his being drafted, fur- 
nish an acceptable substitute, either to the army or the navy, not liable 
to draft, and in accordance with the rules and regulations of the War 
or Navy Department, shall be paid from the State treasury the sum 
of three hundred dollars, which payment shall be made by the pay- 
master-general, upon the presentation of the certificate of a provost 
marshal that such substitute has been mustered into the service of the 
United States for three years or during the war : provided, that the 
said substitute shall be credited to this State, and to the town where 
his principal is enrolled. 

Sec 2. The provisions of an act entitled "An Act to provide for 
the Organization and Equipment of a Volunteer Militia, and to pro- 
vide for the Public Defense," approved June 27th, 1861, and the pro- 
visions of an act entitled "An Act in addition to an Act entitled 'An 
Act in addition to an Act to provide for the Organization and Equip- 
ment of a Volunteer Militia, and to provide for the Public Defense,' " 
approved December 24th, 1862, are hereby extended to the families- 
2 






18 adjutant-general's REPORT. 

of those who have been or shall be mustered into the service of the 
Unite. l States as substitutes under the provisions of this act: prov 
thai such families -hall actually reside in thi< State at the time of said 
muster. 

Approved July 9th, 1864 

The inducements thus li«'ld out to all persons who were 
liable to be drafted, to furnish substitutes in advance of any 
draft, at once created a Large demand fur substitutes, and 

therefore, since ih< v | of the act the greater proportion 

of enlistments have been of this class. 

The following table exhibits the enlistments in the State 
dttring the year for organizations in the field. 



405 
124 
78 
1 
734 
117 





VOLUNTEERS 


For 1st Heavy Artillery, 


« 2d 


a a 


" 1st 


Light Battery, 


" 2d 


CC ii 


" 1st 


Cavalry, 


" 5th Infantry, 


" 6th 


a 


" 7th 


u 


" 8th 


a 


" *>tli 


a 


« 10th 


a 


" 11th 


a 


« 12th 


" 


« 13th 


a 


" 14th 


a 


" loth 


a 


" 16th 


a 


" 17th 


ci 


" 18th 


" 


" 20th 


a 


" 21st 


<•<•-- 


« 29th 


« (Colored,) 



122 
15 

101 
76 

148 
78 
40 

126 

325 
13 

111 

48 

58 

3 

150 

2898 



VOLDNTKER FORCE. 19 

Substitutes for Enrolled men, - - - 3,849 

These substitutes have not been mustered into service for 
any particular regiment, but have been assigned to organiza- 
tions in the field by the Adjutant-General of the Army. The 
following statement will show the number that have actually 
reached each organization up to date of the last report 
received at this office : 



1st 


Artilk 


)TJ 


up to 


Feb. 28th, 1865, 


218 


2d 


a 




it 


" 28th, 1865, - 


15 


1st 


Cavali 


T 


a 


Dec. 31st, 1864, 


50 


1st 


Light 


Bal 


;'y " 


« 31st, 1864, - 


8 


6th Infant 


*7, 


a 


Feb. 28th, 1865, 


156 


7th 


u 




a 


" 28th, 1865, - 


93 


8th 


a 




« 


" 28th, 1865, 


188 


9th 


a 




a 


" 28th, 1865, - 


1 


10th 


a 




a 


Dec. 31st, 1864, 


263 


11th 


a 




a 


Feb. 28th, 1865, - 


263 


12th 


a 




a 


" 28th, 1865, 


1 


13th 


a 




a 


« 28th, 1865, - 


50 


14th 


u 




it 


" 28th, 1865, 


82 


15th 


a 




it 


Dec. 31st, 1864, - 


100 


17th 


a 




a 


Feb. 28th, 1865, 


6 


18th 


a 




a 


" 28th, 1865, - 


5 


21st 


a 




a 


" 28th, 1865, 


1 


29th 


a 


(Colored,) up to Dec. 31st, 1864. 


, 52 



Total, - - - 1,552 

It is thus seen that of thirty-eight hundred and forty nine 
(3849) substitutes enlisted in the State, but fifteen hun- 
dred and fifty-two (1552) had reached the organizations in 
the field up to date of last reports. Making all allowance 
for those who may have reached the 1st Cavalry, 1st Battery, 
10th, 15th and 29th Infantry, between the 31st of December 
and 28th of February, and it is still doubtless true that more 
than one-half of the substitutes mustered into service have 
deserted before reaching the front. 



20 adjutant-general's report. 

I here allude to this fact for the purpose of showing that 
the disgrace of this should not be charged upon Connecticut. 
These were not Connecticut men. 

I have before referred to the demand for substitutes 
which sprang up immediately upon the passage of the act 
paying a bounty of three hundred dollars to each man 
who would furnish a substitute before being drafted. 
During the greater part of this time no bounties were being 
paid by the neighboring large cities, and as a consequence of 
this, and to meet the demand for substitutes here, large num- 
bers of worthless characters, and professional bounty jumpers 
who only entered the service to desert and enlist again, found 
their way into the State from these cities, from Canada and 
elsewhere, were presented at the offices of Provost Marshals, 
mustered into service and sent to the rendezvous. Either 
there, or after leaving for the field, they deserted, receiving 
assistance from confederates outside, who furnished them 
with citizen's clothing and facilitated their escape. 

After a thorough investigation I am satisfied that of the 
substitutes who have enlisted and thus deserted, not one in a 
hundred was a citizen of Connecticut. 

NEW ORGANIZATIONS. 

In August, 1864, your Excellency received authority from 
the War Department, to raise new companies of Infantry, and 
the following order was immediately promulgated. 

General Head- Quarters, State of Connecticut. 
Adjutant-General's Office, "> 
Hartford, Aug. 16, 1864.' } 
General Orders, No. 10. 

I. Pursuant to orders from the War Department, the Commander- 
in-Chief directs that Volunteers for new Companies of Infantry, be 
accepted and mustered into service. 

II. The period of enlistment shall be for one, two, or three years, 
as each Volunteer shall elect. 

III. Any person may recruit men for a new Company under these 
orders, and if he shall succeed in raising thirty men, he shall be enti- 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 21 

tied to receive a commission as 2d Lieutenant, if sixty men, as 1st 
Lieutenant, if ninety men, as Captain, provided, his character and 
abilities shall be such as to meet the approval of the Commander-in- 
Chief. 

IV. Recruits will be delivered at the Office of the Provost Marshal 
of any Congressional District, and be mustered into service, forwarded 
to the General Rendezvous at New Haven, and there provided with 
quarters and subsistence, until such time as the particular Company 
for which they enlisted shall be organized. 

V. If the several companies which may be authorized under these 
orders are not filled up by the 5th of September, the parts of com- 
panies then mustered in will be consolidated, and the officers therefor 
selected and appointed by the Commander-in-Chief from among those 
who have enlisted the men, preference being given to those who have 
enlisted the largest number. 

VI. The several Companies mustered into service will be organized 
into new Regiments or attached to old organizations now in the field, 
as may be determined by the Commander-in-Chief. 

VII. For compensation for their services and the expenses of re- 
cruiting, all persons who shall enlist men for these organizations shall 
be entitled to receive for each volunteer delivered at the office of the 
Provost Marshal, accepted and mustered into service, the sum of ten 
dollars ($10.) 

VIII. Every volunteer enlisted under these orders will be entitled 
to receive from the United States, in addition to the regular pay and 
allowances, a bounty as follows : 

If enlisted for one year, ... - $100 

" " two years, - - - 200 

" " three " 300 

One-third of such bounty to be paid at the date of the organization 

of the Company for which he enlists ; one-third at the expiration of 

one-half of his term of service; and one-third at the expiration of 
his term of service. 

IX. He shall be paid by the State, 

1st, If enlisted for one year, - - - $100 

" " two years, - - 200 

" " three " - 300 

To be paid when he shall have been mustered into service and cred- 
ited to Connecticut, and to the town where he is enrolled or has his 
residence. 

2d. The sum of thirty dollars per year, or at that rate for any 



22 a DJ r l B N B B A L ' B J: H PO BT . 

fraction of a year thai h<- Bbell Uars of which .-hall be 

paid when he i- mustered into service oi the United States, and ten 
dollai months thereafter. 

X. There shall also be paid from the Treasury of this State for 
the Bupport and maintenanc six dollai 
month for the wife, if any there be, and two dollars per month for 
each child under fourfc »e there shall be a 
child or children and no wife, then the sum of Biz dollar- per month 
for the younger child, and two dollars roth for each additional 
child tinder fourteen years oi ovided the amount paid lor any 
one family -hall not in the aggregate the sum of ten dollars 
per month. 

Should he be disabled in the men! to his family 

shall be continued so long as his disability shall exist, and if he -hall 
die, this payment Bhall continue during his term of service, unless the 
company to which he belonged shall be sooner discharged. 

XI. All persons enlisting men under these orders will make daily 
reports to these Head-Quarters of the names of all volunteers enlisted 
by them and the Provost Marshal's office at which delivered. 

By order of His Excellency, 

Wm. A. Buckingham:, 
Governor and Commander-in-CJdef. 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General. 

This endeavor was not attended with a large measure of 
success. Numbers of men were entering the service at this 
time, but substitutes could not enter the new organizat: 
and the volunteers preferred to enlist fur regiments in the 
field. 

One company, numbering one hundred and thirty-eight 
(138) men. was recruited by Thomas S. Gilbert and ethers. 
Upon application to the War Department it was accepted as an 
independent battery, and designated as the "Third Connec- 
ticut Battery." 

The following is a list of of 

Captain, Thomas S. Gilbert : its., Henry Middle- 

brook, Nelson B. Gilbert : 2d Lieuts., Wm. C. Beecher, Rich- 
ard E2. Harden: A.->t. Surgeon, Erastus M. Leffingwell. 

It left the State on the 10th of November, 1864, and pro- 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 23 

ceedcd to the lines before Petersburg, and reported to Brevet 
Brig. Gen'l H. L. Abbot, commanding 1st Connecticut Artil- 
lery, for duty. 



NAVAL CREDITS. 

In the amendment to the enrollment act approved July 4, 
1864, it was provided that all men who had enlisted, or who 
should thereafter enlist in the Navy, should be credited to 
the locality from which they enlisted. 

With a view to securing credit to the State for such enlist- 
ments since the commencement of the war, the following 
circular was issued : 

General Head- Quarters State of Connecticut. 

Adjutant-General's Office, ) 
Hartford, July 27th, 1864. ) 

Circular Xo. 3. 

1. It is provided in the amendment to the Enrollment Act approved 
July 4th, 1864, "That all persons in the naval service of the United 
States, who have entered said service since the present rebellion, who 
have not been credited to the quota of any town, district, ward or 
State, by reason of their being in said service, * * * * shall be en- 
rolled and credited to the quotas of the town, ward, district or State 
in which they respectively reside, upon satisfactory proof of their 
residence made to the Secretary of War." 

2. With a view of obtaining credit for enlistments into the navy 
from Connecticut, the Selectmen of the several towns in the State 
are requested to make, as early as possible, a return to this office, giv- 
ing the names, age and date of enlistment of all volunteers into the 
navy from their respective towns, during the present rebellion, and 
the naval station at which they shipped. The Selectmen will make 
oath to such return before a Justice of the Peace or Notary Public. 

3. The friends of such volunteers, and all persons having knowl- 
edge of such enlistments into the navy, are requested to communicate 
immediately the information desired to the Selectmen of the town in 
which such volunteer resides. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General. 



24 adjutant-general's report. 

On the 30th of July, a Xaval Commission, consisting of Col. 
P. D. Sfewall, A. A. Pro. Mar. Genl on behalf of the United 
States, ami Robert Coit, Jr., Esq., of New London, on behalf 
of the State, was appointed by the War Department to de- 
cide upon the claim of the State for credit for naval enlist- 
ments. 

The reports of the Selectmen of towns received in accord- 
ance with the foregoing circular were presented to this Com- 
mission, and copies of rolls from the Navy Department and 
various receiving ships were obtained. 

After a thorough examination of all the evidence presented, 
the Commission allowed and Col. Sewall passed to the credit 
of the State eighteen hundred and four (1804) enlistments 
into the Navy prior to the passage of the act by Congress. 
Of this number, fourteen hundred and thirteen (1-413) were 
credited direct to the towns for which they enlisted, and 
three hundred and ninety-one (391) were distributed pro 
rata over the State at large. 

Since the passage of the act, three hundred and thirty- 
nine (339) volunteer enlistments into the Navy have been 
reported and credited to the State. 

recruiting in rebel states. 

By an Act of Congress approved July 4th, 1864, it was 
provided that the Governors of loyal States might send 
agents into the rebellious States to recruit for the credit ol 
said loyal States. 

The Legislature of this State also passed the following 
act: 

CHAPTER LXX. 

An Act in addition to u An Act to provide for the payment of a Bounty 
to Volunteers, and for other purposes." 

Wfiereas, The Congress of the United States has passed an act 
authorizing the executives of the several States not in rebellion, to 
send recruiting agents into any of the States declared to be in 
rebellion, except the States of Arkansas, Tennessee and Louisiana, 
and to recruit volunteers under the provisions of said act, who shall 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 25 

be credited to the State, and to the respective sub-divisions thereof, 

which may procure the enlistment : Now therefore, to make said act 

available to this State, in filling its quota of troops for the national 

armies, — 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in Gen- 
eral Assembly convened: 

Sec. 1. The Executive of the State is hereby authorized to ap- 
point one or more agents for this State, to proceed to the said States 
in rebellion not excepted by said act of Congress, there to recruit 
volunteers for the armies of the United States, to be applied on the 
quota of this State, which recruits shall be credited to the State at 
large ; and said Executive of this State may fix the compensation of 
such agents, not exceeding the sum of one hundred dollars for all 
expenses for each volunteer obtained and mustered into the service of 
the United States, to be credited to this State ; such compensation to 
be fixed with reference to the locality where the recruitment is made, 
and with further reference to the expenditure of time and money re- 
quired in procuring such volunteers. 

Sec. 2. This act shall take effect upon the day of its passage. 

Approved July 9th, 1864. 

Immediately upon reception of authority from the War 
Department for sending out agents, the following orders were 
promulgated ; 



General Head- Quarters, State of Connecticut : 
Adjutant-General's Office, ) 
Hartford, July 19th, 1864. > 



General Orders, No. 4. 

The following regulations are adopted for recruiting in the rebel 
States for the credit of Connecticut, in accordance with an Act of 
Congress approved July 4th, 1864, and with General Orders No. 227, 
War Department, dated July 9th, 1864. 

1. Six principal Agents, to be known as Connecticut Recruiting 
Agents, will be appointed by the Commander-in-Chief, and respect- 
ively assigned to duty at the following named rendezvous, which have 
been established by the War Department : 

Camp Casey, Washington, D. C, for N. E. Virginia. 

Camp , near Fort Monroe, Va., for S. E. Virginia. 

Camp , Newbern, N. C, for North Carolina. 

Camp , Hilton Head, S. C, for South Carolina and Florida. 



86 ADJUTANT-GBNBBAL'fi REPORT. 

Camp , Vickflburg, -Mi--., for MississippL 

Camp , Nashville, Tenn., lor ( and Alabama. 

2. Tin- State Agent* will have a letter of appointment, a certified 
copy of which inu-t be filed with the Provost Marshal General, ami 
also with the Commanding Officer of the rendezvous tor the districts 
in which they are t<» recruit Jt -hall he the duty of the Recruiting 

upoo their duties, to report in person through 
the Commanding Officer of the rendezvous to the Commanding Oili- 
ofthe Military Di>trict, Department, or Army, in order that the)' 
may have proper protection. 

3. After reporting f<r this duty, all Agents will be subject to the 

and Artie!.- of War. 

4. The regulations of the War Department provide that u It .shall 
be the duty of the Commanding Officer of the Army, Department or 
District in which Recruiting Agents operate, and of Commanding Offi- 
cer- of rendezvous, to order back to his State, (or arrest and hold for 
trial, as he may deem best,) any Recruiting Agent who shall commit 
frauds upon the Government or recruits, or shall violate the instruc- 
tions issued to govern this recruitment, or be guilty of any offense 
against military law. Recruiting Agents will be held responsible for 
the conduct of all persons who act under their authority or direc- 
tion." 

5. Each principal Agent shall receive for each recruit procured and 
properly mustered into service for the credit of Connecticut, such a 
sum as may be from time to time determined by the Commander-in- 
Chief. 

G. The principal Agent may employ such assistants or sub-agents 
as may b iry in the performance of his duties, subject to the 

approval of the Commander-in-Chief and United States military au- 
thorities. Their compensation shall be such as the principal Agent 
may prescribe, and shall be paid by him out of the premium or eoui- 
pensatiou he I >r the muster-in of each recruit. 

7. It shall be the duty of the Recruiting Agents to see that upon 
the arrival of the recruit at the rendezvous, he is promptly examined, 
and if accepted, mustered into tfa :ed States, for 

the credit of the State of Connecticut at large. Upon such muster, 
the Agent -hall issue to the recruit the proper order on the Paymas- 
ter-General, lor the sum of three hundred dollars, first procuring the 
signature of the Mustering Officer to the certificate on the back of the 
order, that such recruit has been mustered into service, lie -hall also 
witness the signature of the recruit to the order. 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 27 

8. The Paymaster- General shall, with the approval of the Com- 
mander-in-Chief, appoint an Assistant-Paymaster for each rendezvous 
before named, whose duty it shall be to cash the orders of recruits on 
the Paymaster- General) and also pay the principal Agents the estab- 
lished sum for the muster-in of each recruit. 

9. A certified copy of the muster-in-roll will be furnished by the 
Mustering Officer to the Recruiting Agent as often as at least ten 
recruits have been mustered. This roll will in all cases be immedi- 
ately forwarded to the Adjutant-General of the State, at Hartford, the 
Agent retaining a copy of the same, and the Recruiting Agents will 
also make weekly reports to these Head-Quarters of names of the 
sub-agents employed by them, and the names of all the recruits ob- 
tained by each, and duly mustered into service. 

By order of His Excellency, 

Wm. A. Buckingham, 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief. 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General. 



General Head- Quarters State of Connecticut. 
Adjutant-General's Office, ) 
Hartford, July 21st, 1864. ) 
General Orders, No. 5. 

regulations for procuring substitutes in the rebel states. 

1. It is provided by the regulations of the War Department, that 
if it is desired to put any of the recruits obtained in rebel States into 
service as substitutes before or after draft, they must be sent, without 
expense to the Government, by the Recruiting Agent, to the District 
in which the principal is enrolled, and there be mustered in by 
the Provost Marshal, who will issue the proper substitution papers. 

2. An Agent from each County will be appointed by the Governor 
and Commander-in-Chief to proceed to the States in rebellion to ob- 
tain substitutes for such persons as desire them, and a Receiver for 
each County will be appointed to receive deposits of money for the 
procuration of substitutes. 

3. These Receivers whose names and locations will be hereafter 
announced, will at and after 10 o'clock A. M., Wednesday, August 
3d, 18G4, receive deposits in the sum of three hundred dollars ($300) 



28 



ADJUTANT- GENERAL'S REPORT 



from all persons failing that substitutes shall be procured for them 
under this plan. Each person's name shall be enrolled in the order 
that such deposits are made 

4. Each Receiver will, (until circumstances shall warrant an in- 
crease of the number,) receive deposit! for not more than one hundred 
and titty persons. 

5. The sum of three hundred dollars ($300) so deposited shall be 
for the payment of the expenses of obtaining substitutes. The Agent 
shall be entitled to receive for his services, for transportation of re- 
cruits, and all expenses, two hundred dollars ($200) each, or such 
further sum as may be determined to be just and equitable by a 
Board of Adjustment to be hereafter appointed by the Commander- 
in-Chief. If any part of the deposit shall remain after paying neces- 
sary expenses as determined by the Board of Adjustment, it will be 
returned to the depositors. 

6. Upon the arrival of the Agent of any County in the State with 
recruits, the persons named first in order on the roll of the Receiver 
for that county, will be entitled to the substitutes then prepared to be 
mustered in. These persons shall be notified by the Receiver that 
substitutes are obtained for them, and will then be required to attend 
immediately at the office of the Provost Marshal for that District, 
and there to pay over to the substitute, upon his muster into service, 
a bounty of three hundred dollars, ($300) which sum will be reim- 
bursed by the Paymaster-General upon the certificate of the Provost 
Marshal that such substitute has been mustered into service for three 
years or during the war, provided, the principal is enrolled and liable 
to draft, and the substitute is credited to the town where such princi- 
pal is enrolled or has his residence. 

By order of His Excellency, 

William A. Buckingham, 

Governor and Commander-in- Chief. 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General. 

Under General Orders, No. 4, a Principal Agent was ap- 
pointed for each rendezvous therein named. 

Those sent to Washington, D. C. Vicksburg, Miss, and 
Nashville, Tenn. soon returned with the report that circum- 
stances were not favorable to recruiting in those localities and 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 29 

that it was impracticable to obtain a sufficient number of men 

to warrant the continuance of the agencies. 

The agents at Fort Monroe, Newbern and Hilton Head have 

been quite successful. The following statement exhibits the 

number of recruits obtained at each of these places, as reported 

at these Head Quarters. 

At Fort Monroe, V*a. . . 247 

" Newbern, N. C. . .58 

" Hilton Head, S. C. . . 839 



Total, . . . .1144 

In February, 1865, Congress repealed the act giving authority 
to loyal States to recruit in rebel States and the following or- 
ders were immediately issued. 

General Head- Quarters State of Connecticut. 
Adjutant-General's Office,") 
Hartford, March 1st, 1865. j" 
General Orders, No. 1. 

1. Whereas, Congress has passed an amendment to the Enroll- 
ment Act which repeals the clause permitting the loyal States to re- 
cruit in the disloyal States for the credit of such loyal States, 
therefore — 

It is ordered that all recruiting agents for Connecticut now on duty 
in rebel States shall cease enlisting and mustering men for credit of 
Connecticut, immediately upon the receipt of this order. 

All agents will report their action to these Head-Quarters and will 
then await further orders. 

2. The Paymaster- General will direct all Acting Assistant Pay- 
masters on duty in rebel States to cease paying bounties until further 
orders. 

By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General 



30 a i) ,t r t a N r-G i: ni:i:al'h report. 

ruJ Head-Quarters State of Connecticut. 
Adjutant-Genebal's Office, j 

Hartford, March 8th, 1865. » 
bal Orders, No. 2. 

1. All Connecticut Recruiting Agents, appointed under General 
Orders No. 1. series of 1864, these Head-Quarters, to recruit in rebel 
States for the credit of Connecticut, will immediately upon receipt of 
order cease recruiting, close up the business of their respective a{ 

their files of muster rolls and return to Connecticut. 
They will on arrival in this State report in person or by letter to 
the Adjutant-General, file in this office all muster rolls not already 
forwarded and will also make a consolidated report of the number of 
men enlisted by them and mustered into B< rvice Bince their appoint- 
ment. 

2. The Acting Assistant Paymasters on duty in rebel States will 
return to Connecticut, report in person to the Paymaster-General and 
at once settle their accounts with that Department. 

If relieved from duty by the Paymaster-General they will forward 
their resignations to these Head-Quarters accompanied by the certifi- 
cate of the Paymaster-General that their accounts have been properly 
adjusted and that they are not indebted to the State. 
By order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General. 

The machinery for procuring substitutes in rebel States in 

accordance with General Orders, No. 5, was put in operation 
immediately after issuing the order. 

Receivers were appointed for each county, and a large 
number of deposits received. The agents proceeded to the 
South, hut after earnest eilort to procure men returned with- 
out success. It was found that recruits could, upon being 
mustered in at the several rendezvous where enlisted, re- 
ceive as large bounties as would be paid after reaching Con- 
necticut, and men could not be induced to come North 
under these circumstances. 

The Receivers were therefore directed to return the money 
in their hands to the parties who had made the deposits. 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 31 



FIRST ARMY CORPS. 



On the 28th of November, 1864, the Secretary of War di- 
rected that a new army corps, to be designated as the 1st 
Army Corps should be organized. The corps was to be com- 
posed entirely of officers and men who had served for two 
years and been honorably discharged. Major-General W. S. 
Hancock was assigned to the command. For the informa- 
tion of any Connecticut veterans who might desire to enter 
the corps, the following circular was issued. 

General Head- Quarters, State of Connecticut. 



Adjutant-General's Office, ) 
Hartford, December 16th, 1864. \ 



Circular No. 8. 



By order of the War Department a new Army Corps is now being 
organized at Washington, designated as the First Corps and to be 
composed of Officers and men who have served not less than two 
years and been honorably discharged. 

Officers desiring appointments in this corps will apply in writing to 
the Adjutant-General of the Army, giving a clear statement of their 
previous service. If the papers are approved the several applicants 
will receive full information as to examinations and appointments. 

Veterans desiring to enlist, can present themselves at the office of 
any Provost Marshal and be examined, and if accepted will be fur- 
nished free transportation to Washington, where they will be mus- 
tered into service. 

For the information of all Connecticut men desiring to enter this 
corps as volunteers, the following statement of bounties to which they 
will be entitled is published, viz. : 

1st, From the United States, el bounty of three hundred dollars 
($300) as soon as mustered into service, and in addition the regular 
installments in proportion to the period of enlistment, as follows : 
For one year's service, One hundred dollars ($100.) 
For two years' service, Two hundred dollars ($200,) 
For three years' service, Three hundred dollars ($300.) 

One-third in each case to be paid on enlistment. 

2d, From the State y a bounty as follows : 



- 

If enlisted for one year, One hundred dollars ($100.) 
If enlisted for two fMn, Two hundred dollar.^ ($200.) 

If enlisted tor three years, Three hundred dollars ($000.) 
The entire amount in earli case to be paid when mustered in for 
the credit <>f Connecticut. 

An Acting Assistant Paymaster for Connecticut will be stationed 
in Washington to pay the State bounty. 

3d, A> the recruits will be credited to the towns where they reside, 
they will also be entitled to ive»-ive all local bounties. 
l>y order of the Commander-in-Chief, 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

A '/jutant- General. 

The Connecticut veterans who again entered the service 
have manifested a decided preference for Connecticut organi- 
zations, and very few men from this State have enlisted for 
this corps. 

U. S. ARMY AND VETERAN RESERVE CORPS. 

During the year nine hundred and twenty-six (926) men 
have enlisted into the United States Army, and Veteran Re- 
serve Corps, and been credited to this State. These men 
have drawn the bounty of three hundred dollars as provided 
by law, but have not received and under the existing law are 
not entitled to the annual bounty of thirty dollars or the 
State aid to families, which can only be paid in cases where 
the volunteer has been accepted into the service of the 
Stale and turned over to the service of the United States. 
As these men enlisted directly into the service of the United 
States they do not come under the provisions of the law. 

This is right in so far as the recruits for the regular army 
are concerned, as a distinction should be made in favor of 
the Volunteer Force, and greater inducements held out to 
men to enter the service in organizations from this State, 
rather than in the army, so that the State shall get the full 
benefit and credit of their service and their record become 
part of the history of the volunteer militia. But in the case 
of enlistments into the Veteran Reserve Corps, this reasoning 
does not hold good. The men who enlist here can not enter 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. '33 

into the service in the Volunteer Force if they would. 
They are men who have served faithfully in Connecticut 
regiments ; been discharged for disability and now again 
enter the service in the only place where they can be 
received. 

I would most respectfully recommend such an amendment 
to the law as will secure to men who have enlisted in the 
Veteran Reserve Corps, and been credited to Connecticut or 
who shall enlist and be credited, the annual bounty of thirty 
dollars, and State aid to their families. 



SUMMARY OF QUOTAS AND CREDITS. 

The quotas assigned to this State under the several calls 
for troops are as follows, viz. : 

On call of 1861, for 75,000 three months men, 780 

" " 1861, for 500,000 three years men, 13,057 

" " July, 1862, for 300,000 " " " 7,145 

" " " 1862, for 300,000 nine months men, 7,145 

" " Feb., 1864, for 500,000 three years men, 7,919 

" Mch.,1864, for 200,000 " " " 3,168 

" " July, 1864, for 500,000 " " " 8,408 
" " Dec, 1864, for 300,000 (no assignment ree'd.) 



Total, 47,622 



The State has furnished : 



One Squadron Cavalry, - - - - 162 

*One Battalion « - . - - 324 

Three Batteries Artillery, - 446 

fTwenty-eight Regiments Infantry, - - 25,503 

Fourteen Companies Infantry, (Colored,) - - 1,468 

Recruits for above Organizations, (White,) - 10,940 

" " « (Colored,) - 173 



Carried forward, 39,016 



* Afterwards increased to a full regiment. 

t Two of these afterwards changed to Heavy Artillery. 

3 



M ADJUTANT- GENERAL'S REPORT. 

Brought forward, 39,016 
FroinU. S. Draft of 1863: 

Drafted Men held to service, - - - 248 

Famished Substitu - - - 2,213 

Paid Commutation of 1800, - 1,459 

Veteran re-enlistments in the field, - - 3,647 

Volunteer enlistments in U. S. Navy. - - 2,143 
Enlistments in U. S. Army and Veteran Reserve Corps, 969 

Substitutes for enrolled men not drafted, - - 3,849 

Drafted men, draft of 1864, - 14 

Substitutes for drafted men, draft of 1864, 87 

Recruits obtained in Rebel States, and credited, 823 



Total, 54,468 

Reducing the above credits to the standard of three years, 
the account of the State stands as follows, not including the 
three months men : 
Three months men, 2,340, 
Nine months men, 5,602, - 
One year men, 529, 

Two years men, 25, - 

Three years men, 44,142, 
Four years men, 26, - 

Not known, 1,804, 



c< 




1,400 


u 




176 


a 




16 


a 




44,142 


a 




34 


ii 


say, 


1,804 



54,468 47,572 

Thus the State has furnished equal to forty-seven thousand 
five hundred and seventy-two (47,572) three years men. from 
which deduct the total quota, also reduced to the three years 
standard, viz., forty-one thousand four hundred and eighty- 
three, (41,483,) and the State has a surplus of six thousand 
and eighty-nine (6,089) in three years men, without reference 
to its quota under the call of December, 1864, which has not 
yet been assigned. 

It will be noticed that in the above statement is given 
eighteen hundred and four (1,804) men, term of service not 
known. This is the credit allowed by the Naval Commis- 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 35 

sion, and the term of service is to be determined by the Navy 
Department. In the statement these men are counted as 
three years men. Should the average term of service prove 
to be for a less period than this, the credit to the State will 
be reduced in proper proportion. 

By a late act of Congress, the three months men are to be 
credited. This State having furnished twenty-three hundred 
and forty (2,340) three months men, will be entitled to a 
credit for one hundred and ninety-five (195) three years 
men. 

In the foregoing statement a credit of eight hundred and 
twenty-three (823) is given for recruits obtained in rebel 
States. There have been actually enlisted eleven hundred 
and forty-four, (1,144,) and upon presentation of the rolls to 
the War Department, the State will be entitled to a further 
credit of three hundred and twenty-one (321) three years 
men from this source. 



PROMOTIONS. 

In February, 1865, the following circular was issued, an- 
nouncing the ruling that would govern your Excellency in 
making promotions in the Volunteer Force : 



General Head- Quarters, State of Connecticut. 
Adjutant-General's Office, ) 
Hartford, Feb. 8th, 1865. ) 



Circular No. 1. 

The Commanders of the several Connecticut regiments, batteries 
and battalions in the field, are hereby required to appoint a Board 
of Examination for such organization, over which Board said Com- 
manders shall preside, to examine candidates for promotion in the line 
offices. 

Whenever vacancies in those offices shall exist, and officers, non- 
commissioned officers or privates shall desire an examination, the 
commanders of regiments, batteries, or battalions shall determine the 
number of enlisted men who may appear before the Board from each 
company, which persons shall then be designated by the Captain, or 
other officer in command of the company. Lieutenants may be exr 
amined without such designation. 



36 adjutant-general's report. 

It shall be the duty of the Board, to approve only those who upon 
a thorough examination ar<- found to be qualified for promotion. 

Nominations to the Governor, by commanding officers, of persons 
to fill vacancies in th<- line offices, are required to be made from 
among the number of those who shall have been approved by the 
Board- of Examination, and will be accompanied by a statement that 

the Dominees have been 90 approved. Field officers are requested to 
recommend Captains who arc qualified for promotion. 

Commanding officers may, however, also nominate for promotion, 
without examination, officers, Don-commissioned officers and privates, 
who shall distinguish themselves to a marked degree by gallantry, 
good conduct and efficiency, stating in all such cases the particular 
service or merit, for which promotion is advised. 

In making nominations and recommendations, regard should be 
paid both to seniority and to merit. Seniority must not control where 
the interests of the service will be advanced by promoting the more 
meritorious and deserving, nor where intemperance or other vicious 
habits have so impaired the moral character of an officer as to deprive 
him of the respect and confidence of the men under his command. 

Before a nomination can be confirmed and a commission issued? 
official evidence that a vacancy exists must be furnished, and com- 
manding officers are hereby required to forward to these Head-Quar- 
ters, a notification of the death or muster out of service of any officers 
in their respective commands, and to furnish certified copies of all 
orders received by them, discharging officers from the service for any 
cause* 

All recommendations for promotion and notifications of discharge 
from service, will be forwarded to the Governor through the office of 
the Adjutant- General. 

The commanders of regiments, batteries and battalions, will cause 
this Circular to be read to their respective commands, at such times 
as they may deem proper. 

By order of His Excellency, 

William A. Buckingham, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chief, 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General. 



VOLUNTEER FORCE. 37 

REGISTER OF COMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND HISTORY OF ORGANIZA- 
TIONS IN THE FIELD. 

With a view to making this division as complete and inter- 
esting as possible, I addressed the following letter to the Com- 
manding Officer of each Connecticut organization : 

General Head- Quarters, State of Connecticut. 
Adjutant-General's Office, \ 
Hartford, Feb. 6, 1865. ) 

Commanding Connecticut Volunteers : 



In a short time I shall make my annual report to His Excellency 
the Governor and Commander-in-Chief, which will be transmitted to 
the General Assembly, and published. 

It is my desire, in this report, to give as full a history of all Con- 
necticut regiments and batteries as possible. 

I have, therefore, the honor respectfully to request, 

1st. That immediately after the 1st of March next, you forward to 
this office a brief, compact history of your command since March 1st, 
1864, embodying in it a statement of all marches, movements and 
matters of interest which have not been included in official reports. 

2d. That if your command has, during the year, been in any en- 
gagement of which no official report has already been forwarded to 
this office, you forward full report with list of casualties. 

3d. That if your command or any of your officers or men have 
been in orders commended for bravery, gallantry in action, or good 
conduct, or have received medals, you send copies of orders. 

I know you will take the greatest interest in thus aiding to present 
to the people of our State, in an official form, a clear and reliable 
history of the Connecticut Volunteer Force. 

In order to reach me in time for the report, the desired information 
must be sent promptly at the date named. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

HORACE J. MORSE, 

Adjutant- General. 

The response to this request has been very general and 
reports are received from nearly all the commanding officers. 
I transmit the reports as received, thus allowing each officer 
to give the history of his command in his own words. In 
cases where reports have not come to hand, I give as full a 
record of the organization as possible, taking the data from 
the monthly reports and muster rolls, on file in this office. 



38 



adjutant-general's report 






FIRST REGIMENT HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



Rank arul Name. 



Cohm I. 
Henry L. Abbot,* 

Limt. Col 
Thos. S. Trumbull, 
Nelson L. White, 

Majors. 

George B. Cook, 
Albert P. Brooker, 
George Ager, 
I - Hemingway 
Thos. S. Trumbull, 

Chaplain. 
Samuel F. Jarvis, 

Surgeons. 
Samuel W. Skinner 
Samuel W. Skinner 

1st Asst. Surgeon. 
John S. Delevan, 

2d Asst. Surgeon. 
Nathaniel Matson, 
Asst. Surg. Battery A 
David C. Card, 

Captain*. 
Chas. O. Brigham, 
Henry H. Pierce, 
Samuel P. Hatfield, 
William G. Pride, 
William A. Lincoln, 
Charles R. Bannan, 
John M. Twiss, 
George 1). Sargeant, 
Glenroy P. Mason, 
George Dimock, 
William C. Faxon, 
Bela P. Learned, 
Edwin C. Dow, 
Albert F. Brooker, 
Daniel R. Hubbard, 
Franklin A. Pratt, 
Edward A. Gillette, 
John H. Burton, 
George Ager, 
Wilbur F. Osborne, 

1st Lieutenants. 
Goo. M. Williams, 
Cornelius Gillette, 
William C. Rogers, 
Ebcnezer P. Mason, 
Joseph Talcott, 



Residence. 



Jan. 19,1863 



Date of 
( lommission. 



l\ S Army, 

Hartford, 
Danbnry, 

New London, 
Wolcottville, 
Derby, 

Hartford, 
Hartford, 

Salisbury, 

Windsor Lks. 
Windsor Lks. 

Albany, N.Y. 

Shodach,N.Y 

Willimantic, 

Boston, Mass. 

Hartford, 

Middletown, 

Derby, 

New Haven, 

Waterbury, 

Hartford, 

Middletown, 

Hartford, 

New London, 

Stonin^ton, 

Norwich, 

New Haven, 

Wolcottville, 

Middletown, 

Hartford, 

Hartford, 

New Haven, 

Derby, 

Birmingham, 

New London, 
Hartford, 

Farmington, 
West Ilartf d, 



May 



Remarks. 



29,1864 Died of disease Marcli 30, 1865. 
15,1861 Mustered out Nov. 19, '64,term exp'd. 



Jan. 22,1863 
Sept. 5,1864 
Nov. 29,1864 
Nov. 13,1861 
March 1,1862 

Nov. 14,1862 

June 5,1861 
Re-mustered. 



Disch'd for disabilitv, Aug. 17, '64. 
Promoted Lt. Col., Nov. 29, 1864. 



Term expired June 5, 1864. 



April 7,1864 Honorably discharged Mch. 26, 1865. 
April 7,1864 
Sept. 16,1864 



Jan. 

Feb. 

Dec. 

April 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

May 

June 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

May 

Dec. 

Dec. 
Mch. 
Men. 
Oct 

Oct. 



1863 
1863 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1861 
1862 
1862 
1862 



1862; 

1863| 
1862 
1863 



18,1863 
16,1864 

16,1864 
25,1864 
25,1864 



Must'd out Oct. 26, 1864, term exp'd. 
Promoted to be Major Sept. 5, 1864. 
Discharged, disability, Sept. 20,1864. 
Mibt'd out Nov. 11, '64, term exp'd. 
" 4, '64, 
" Dec. 23, '64, 
Promoted Major Nov. 29, 1864. 
Must'd out Nov. 4, 1S64, term exp'd. 



* Appointed brevet brigadier-general. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 
First Regiment Heavy Artillery — Continued. 



39 



Rank and Name. 



1st Lieutenants. 
HenryD. Patterson, 
Robert Lewis, 
John O'Brien, 
Frank Bangs, 
Thomas D. Cashin, 
Chas. A. Truesdell, 
George F. Bill, 
Sterl. A. Woodruff, 
Lewis B. Sturgis, 
Thomas J. Beers, 
Wm. 11. Guernsey, 
Isaac N. Wcstervelt 
Jos. H. Cummings, 
Roswell S. Dou-lass, 
William G. Pride, 
William A. Lincoln, 
John M. Twiss, 
George D. Sergeant, 
Bela P. Learned, 
Charles R. Bannan, 
Glenroy P. Mason, 
George Dimoek, 
Lewis G. Logan, 
James R. Bunce, 
William C. Faxon, 
Paul-Harwood, 
George L. Turner, 
Charles II. Owen, 
John Odell, 
William H. Brown, 
Louis W. Jackson, 
Andrew Knox, 
Henry A. Pratt, 
William W. Pardee, 

2d Lieutenants. 
Martin L. Church, 
Henry W. Loo mis, 
W. H. H. Bingham, 
John E. Tarbell, 
Azro Brown, 
Charles W. Smith, 
Hobert W. Deming, 
Wells W. Reed, 
Charles W. Filer, 
William B At wood, 



Residence. 



Naugatuck, 

East Berlin, 

New Haven, 

Derby, 

Windsor Lks. 

Hartford, 

Hartford, 

Hanvinton, 

New Haven, 

New Haven, 

Plymouth, ♦ 

Cromwell, 

Waterbury, 

Lowell,Mass., 

Derby, 

New Haven, 

Hartford, 

Middletown. 

Norwich, 

Waterburv, 

Hartford, * 

New London, 

Washington, 

Hartford, 

Stonington, 

New Haven, 

Suffield, 

Hartford, 

New London, 

New Haven, 

Hartford, 

Danbury, 

Bridgeport, 

New Haven, 

Watertown, 

EastHaddam, 

Suffield, 

EastHaddam, 

Farmington, 

Hartford, 

Hartford, 

New Haven, 

PI v mouth. 



Date of 
Commission. 



William B. Burgiss, Killingly, 
Gardner Reynolds, Suffield, 
James H. Casey, East Haven, 
William S. Mal'oney, New Haven, 
A us. S. Humphrey, Hartford, 
George H. Couch,' Hartford, 
Chas. A. Chittenden, Clinton, 
John W. Miller, iDerby, 
James J. Bergin, jNew Haven, 
Wm. H. Batterson, Stratford, 



Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Mch. 

Mch. 

Mch. 

Mch. 

May 

May 

May 

May 

Aug. 

Aug. 

; Jan. 

Jan. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Mch. 

Mch. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

May 

May 

Feb. 

April 

April 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

!Nov. 



Remarks. 



1864 

1864 

18641 

1864' 

18641 

1864] 

1864; 

1864j 

1864 

1864 

1864] 

1864 

1862|Died August 28, 1864. 

1862 Must'd out Nov. 12, '64, term exp'd. 

1862 Promoted Captain April 1, 1864. 

1862; " " Oct. " 



1862! 
1862; 
1862J 
18621 
1862; 
1862 ! 



Nov. 
Dec. 
Oct. 
Nov. 



25, 1864. 
31, 1864. 
11, 1864. 
29, 1864. 
25, 1864. 
11, 1864. 
29. 1864. 



1863 Must'd out Oct. 22, 1864, term exp'd. 

1863 Resigned June 23, 1864. 

1863 Promoted Captain Nov. 29, 1864. 

1863 Resigned June 16, 1864. 

1864 Died August 21, 1864. 
1864JHonorably discharged Dec. 15, 1864. 
1864 Killed in action March 25, 1865. 
1862 Must'd out Mch. 12, '65, term exp'd. 
18621 " " 11, '65, " 

1862 " " 15, '65, 

1863 " " 18, '65, " 

1864 " " 11/65, " 



18,1864 
25,1864 
25,18641 
25,1864' 
25,18641 
25,1864' 
25,1864! 
25,1864 
25,1864 
25,1864! 
31,1864i 
31,1864; 
31,1864 
31,1864 
27,1864 
27,1864 
11,1864 
11,1864 
11,1864 
11,1864 



40 



A D J U T A N T-<; K N E R A L ' S REPORT. 
U II vii Artillrr</ — Continued. 






Rank and Name. 




( ommu 


2d 1 








Jam.- P. Elliott, 


Mam.!: 


Rot. 19,18 




Charles N Billiman, 


tor, 


N..V. 


Isaac N. \\'< 


Cromwell, 


Jnlv 9,1863 Promoted 1st Lieut. Dec. 29, 1864. 


William II. ! 


Hartford, 


1 Mmj :>. l ■ 


Frank Ban 


Derby, 


1,1862 Promoted 1st Lieut 


Ebenei 


Panmi 


" 25, 1864. 


William W. : 


port, 


April 1, 1864. 


Joseph Tal 


West Hartfd, 


•Jan. 1,1863 " " "25,1864. 


Frederick I. . i 


Plj month, 


Eeh. 9,180:! Must'd out Oct. 19, '61, term exp'd. 


Aaron R. Day, 


[»ort, 


Aug. 25,1863 Must'd out I » exp'd. 


Henry D. P 


Naugatuck, 


1 1st Lieir 1864. 


is, 


Beat Berlin, 


" 25, 1864. 


Arthur II. T\\ ining, 


Hartford, 


\ ._. 25,1863 Must'd out Oct 96, '64, term exp'd. 


Benjamin Andrews. 


Suffield, 


Aug. 25,1363 " " 29, '64, 


John 1 


New Haven, 


Dec. 18,1863 Promoted 1st Lieut. Oct. 25, 1864. 


Thoma< I). Cashin, 


Windsor Lks. 


Dec. 18,1863' " M " 27, 1864. 


John Odell, 


N\w London, 


Dec. 18,1863 " " " 31, 1864. 


Alfred L. morgan, 


Middletown, 


Dec. 18,1863 Must'd out Oct. 26, '64, term exp'd. 


George F. Bill, 


Hartford, 


Dec. 18,1863 Promoted 1st Lieut. Nov. 11, 1864. 


Philip Manix, 


Hartford, 


Dec. 18,1863 Must'd out Oct. 29, '64, term exp'd. 


Edward L. Tvlcr, 


Norwich, 


Men. 29,1862 Discharged, disability, April 9, 1864. 


Chas. A. Truesdell, 


Hartford, 


April 1,1864 Promoted 1st Lieut. Oct. 27, 1864. 
April 1,1864 Killed in action July 12, 1864. 


Eben P. Hall, 


Suffield, 


Sterl. A. Woodruff, 


Harwinton, 


April 1,1864 Promoted 1st Lieut. Nov. 11, 1864. 


Thomas J. Beers, 


New Haven, 


April 1,1864 " " " 29, 1864. 


Wm. R. Guernsey, 


Plymouth, 


April 1,1864 " - 29, 1864. 


Lewis B. Sturgess, 


New Haven, 


April 1,1864 


u " 29, 1864. 



^ I R S T REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 41 

} 



Head Quarters 1st Conn. Artillery, 
Broadway Landing, Va., March 24th, 1865. 



Brig.-Gen'l H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 
General : — 

Having received the requisite authority from the War Department, 
I have the honor to submit, as requested in your circular of February 
last, the following report upon the operations of my regiment during 
the year ending March 1, 1865. 

It has served with a few auxiliary troops all the heavy guns in 
front of Richmond. Being thus on the lines of two armies, its organ- 
ization has been so peculiar, as to render necessary many details and 
some reference to other troops. 

Moreover its experience has been so considerable with the new 
kinds of artillery and of projectiles, that I have added a short state- 
ment of the results of this practical test of modern Siege Artillery, 
which will, I think, possess scientific interest, as well as enhance the 
reputation of the officers of this regiment by whose unusual and often 
laborious efforts, these results have been obtained. 

At the beginning of the year my regiment was stationed in the 
Defences of Washington, holding the seven forts from Fort Scott to 
Fort Ward, on the line south of the Potomac. 

PREPARATION OF THE SIEGE TRAIN. 

On April 20th, 1864, I received a confidential memorandum from 
Major-General Halleck, Chief of Staff, Armies of the United States, 
directing me to organize a siege train. 

I was informed that this memorandum was based upon a project 
drawn up by Brig.-Gen'l H. J. Hunt, Chief of Artillery, Army of 
the Potomac, and that it w T as intended to order me to report to him 
when the train was brought into use. Its composition, since largely 
increased, was the following, viz ; forty rifled siege guns, (4j-inch ord- 
nance or 30-pdr. Parrotts,) ten 10-inch mortars, twenty 8-inch mortars, 
twenty Coehorn mortars, with a reserve of six 100-pdr. Parrotts. Sub- 
sequently ten 8-inch siege howitzers were added to the list. The ne- 
cessary mortar wagons, battery wagons, forges, etc., were to be provided) 
together with the following supply of ammunition : 1000 rounds per 
gun, except the 100-pdrs., which were to have 500 rounds each ; 600 
rounds per heavy mortar, and 200 rounds per Coehorn. 



42 adjutant-gknkral's report. 

All this train wws to be afloat at the Washington Arsenal as soon 
as possible, and twenty siege guns complete with 200 rounds each, were 
to be afloat at thai depot by April 80th, without fail. 

Very little of this material was in depot at Washington Arsenal, 

but it was collected from all quarters with great rapidity by the Ord- 
nance Department About a dozen Bchoonere of about 200 tons bur- 
den were furnished without delay by the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment. 

I detailed Captain S. P. Hatfield, 1st Conn. Artillery, as Ordnance 
Officer of the train, and placed him at the Arsenal, assisted by 1st 
Lieut. L. AV. Jackson, to superintend the loading. 

As the ordnance arrived, it was promptly placed on the schooners. 
The decks were shored up and ten 30-pdr. guns placed amidships 
side by side, re-ting on skids. Their carriages, platforms, and 3000 
rounds of ammunition complete, were packed in the hold. The masts 
and rigging afforded facilities for loading this material, and rendered 
the schooners far superior to the canal barges used for the siege train 
of 1862. The 10-inch mortars, with 2200 rounds, were loaded on 
one schooner. The 8-inch mortars, with 2300 rounds, together with 
the Coehorn mortars, were loaded on another. The 8-inch howitzers, 
with their carriages, the mortar w r agons, platforms and miscellaneous 
articles, filled another. The six 100-pdrs., with 2000 rounds, loaded 
another. The rest of the vessels carried ammunition, etc. This 
material was essentially afloat by May 10th. 

REGIMENT ORDERED FORWARD IN ADVANCE OF THE TRAIN. 

On that date my regiment was ordered forward in advance of the 
train, to report for duty to Major-General Butler, then near Bermuda 
Hundred, Va. We arrived on May 13th, about 1700 strong; but 
349 men were discharged in ten days, on account of expiration of 
term of service. The regiment has since been filled to the maxi- 
mum. 

I had been notified by General Halleck that if General Butler 
desired it, a part of my train might be sent forward at once. Upon 
landing, however, I found four 30-pdr. ParrotKand five 20-pdr. Parrotts 
already disembarked, and as other pieces were subsequently received 
from Fort Monroe, this was not judged necessary. 

On May 14th, I was ordered to report to Col. Howell, 85th Pa., 
commanding the line of defenses of Bermuda Hundred. 

My regiment was at once put to work, getting the heavy guns into 
position, making magazines, strengthening the lines, etc., etc. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY 



43 



On May loth, the main army fell back to the line of entrench- 
ments. 

On May 17th, General Butler placed me in command of the Siege 
Artillery of his army, then consisting of my regiment and Co. M, 
3d Pa. Artillery, Capt. Korte, serving two 8-inch howitzers, ordering 
me to report direct to his headquarters. 

1st Lieut. W. C. Faxon was immediately detailed by me as Ord- 
nance Officer, assisted by 1st Lieut. C. Gillette. A reserve depot of 
ammunition, to consist of 100 rounds per gun, was established near 
Hatcher's House, and a regular system of supply for the batteries 
was organized. From this date until the arrival of the army of the 
Potomac, in the latter part of June, a heavy artillery fire was kept 
up much of the time, along the lines. 

On May 20th, a strong demonstration was made by the enemy upon 
our position, in which they drove in the pickets, but were repulsed on 
the left by the artillery fire of the works, and on the right (in woods) 
by the 1st division, 10th corps. 

My guns in position were then the following : 





30 pdr. j 20 pdr. 
l'arrott. J Parrott. 


8 siege 
Howitzers. 


32 pdr. 
Howitzers. 


24 pdr. 
Howitzers. 


Total. 


Battery " Drake," 
" " Perry," 
" "Anderson," 
" "Pruyn," 


2 
2 


3 
2 
2 
1 


2 


2 


1 


5 

2 
4 
6 


Total, 


4 


8 


2 


2 


1 


17 



The fire of those guns bearing on the point of attack (ten in num- 
ber,) was effective, and contributed much to the easy repulse of the 
enemy. On May 24th, the rebels made a determined attack upon 
Wilson's Landing, on James River, garrisoned chiefly by colored 
troops. 

The mail-boat was stopped, and all the troops on board were landed 
to meet the assault. Among them were six enlisted men of the First 
Conn. Artillery, returning from veteran volunteer furlough. Al- 
though no officer of the regiment was present, these men volunteered 
to serve a 10-pdr. Parrott, then silenced, and did so, so effectively as 
to contribute materially to the repulse of the rebels. They fired 
about eighty rounds, — some being double-shotted cannister at about 
200 yards range, — and their gun was the only one not silenced by the 
enemy. The names of these brave soldiers are Sergt. W. H. H. 



44 adjutant-general's report. 

Bingham, Co. G, (since promoted,) Privates W. B. Watson, Co. 
II, Jamee Kelley, (since killed by s Bhell in front of Petersburg,) 
II. (i. Scott, James U. ?ouag, and Joan Keafton, of Co. I. 

Op May 25th, CJo. (;. Lsf Conn, Artillery, Capt. Osborne, was 
placed, with two 20-pdr. Parrotte, in Fort Converse, on right bank of 
Appomattox river. Subsequently, two 80-pdr. Parrota were added. 
They did good service in repelling an attack on May 81st, and also in 
Occasionally shelling Fort Clifton from an advanced position on the 
liver bank. 

On May 26th, Major-General Grillmore was placed in command of the 
whole line. On the 29th, he appointed me his Chief of Artillery, and 
on June 1st, bis Acting Chief Engineer. There were at this time, 
beside my Biege guns, eight light batteries in Terry'- Division, and six 
liu r lit batteries, with eight mountain howiteers in addition, in Turner's 
Division. Total, 82 light guns. 

On June 2d, the rebels made a strong demonstration on our Knee. 
Previously (on May 21st,) Co. L, 1st Conn. Artillery, Capt. Pride, 
had been placed in the advanced redoubt, " Dutton," then partially 
completed, with two 32-pdr. and one 24-pdr. brass howitzers, and had 
energetically proceeded to put the work in fighting condition. After 
driving in the picket lines on June 2d, the 22d S. C. regiment, Col. 
Dantzler, made a determined assault upon this redoubt. It was re- 
pulsed with severe loss by cannister fire, the Colonel himself being 
among the killed, of whom 17 were counted. So demoralized were 
his command, that a Lieutenant and 22 enlisted men surrendered to 
the garrison rather than attempt to retreat under the fire. They were 
brought in with their arms, by a detachment of Co. L, 1st Conn. 
Artillery, and some dismounted cavalry serving as infantry support-. 

On June 4th, a platoon of Co. H, 1st Conn. Artillery, with one 
30-pdr. Parrott, with Ashby'a battery of four 20-pdr. Parrotts, was 
placed under command of 1st Lieut. George Dimock, 1st Conn. Ar- 
tillery, in Battery " SpofFord." Subsequently, after several changes, 
this armament was fixed at one 100-pdr. Parrott and three 4£-inch 
guns, all served by Lieut. Dimock's platoon. 

On June 14th, the 18th Corps under Mnj or- General Smith arrived in 
advance of the Army of the Potomac, and at once moved on Peters- 
burg. 

On June 20th, Co. I, 1st Conn. Artillery, Capt. Burton, was sent 
with two 30-pdr. Parrotts, (a third subsequently added,) to his front. 

On June 21st, the rebel ranis came down near Dutch Gap, and with 
the Ilowlett's-house rebel battery fired on our fleet. Lieut Dimock 
replied from battery "Spofford," and ultimately silenced the battery. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 



45 



SIEGE TRAIN ARRIVED. ORGANIZATION OF THE SIEGE ARTILLERY. 

On June 23d, my regular train arrived from Washington Arsenal, 
in charge of Capt. Hatfield. Lieut. Gen. Grant immediately ordered 
me to report to Brig. Gen. Hunt, Chief of Artillery, Army of the 
Potomac, for the service of that train, detaching such companies from 
the Bermuda Hundred lines as were necessary for serving the guns, 
but not otherwise changing my duties under General Butler. Accord- 
ingly since that date I have held the double position of Commanding 
Officer of the Siege Artillery of the Army of the James, and of the 
Siege Train of the Army of the Potomac. All the heavy artillery 
in front of Richmond has thus been served under a common head, 
and chiefly by the 1st Conn. Artillery. 

Prior to this date, all my ordnance supplies were draAvn from Capt. 
A. Mordecai, Chief Ordnance Officer, Army of the James. After its 
arrival, the siege train was supplied by direct requisition upon the 
Ordnance Department, and subsequently, by order of Gen. Grant, the 
procuring of all ordnance supplies for heavy guns for both armies was 
placed under ray charge. 

The following is a full statement of firing done under the former 
system : 



ISu7aVu , S f C°-- d ^0fflcers. 


30 

pdr. 
Parrot 


20 14$ in. 

pdr. Ord. 

Parrot! Gun. 


32 pdr. 
How- 
itzer. 


24 pdr. 
How- 
itzer. 


Total 

No. 

R'nds. 


Battery "Anderson," 
" * "Pruvn," 
" "Perry," 
Eedoubt "Dutton," 
Fort "Converse," 
Battery "SpofFord," 


Maj. T. S. Trumbull, 

Cpts. Pierce & Gillett. 

Capt. E. A. Gillett, 
" W. G. Pride, 
" W. F. Osborne, 

Lieut. Geo. Dimock, 


349 
155 

234 
166 


378 
54 
16 

353 
24 


19 


157 


66 


727 
209 
16 
223 
587 
209 




Total, 


904 


825 


19 


157 


66 


1971 



My first duty, upon the arrival of the train proper, was to establish 
a suitable depot. After due examination, Broadway Landing on the 
Appomattox river was selected, and three substantial wharves were 
built. My orders were to keep the material afloat, and this has been 
scrupulously done, no ammunition even being unloaded except to put 
upon the wagons. 

Maj. Gen. Butler established a telegraph office at the Landing for 
the service of the train, and gave me a detail of two companies of the 
138th Ohio N. G. for ordnance duty. They were relieved on July 
15th by two companies of 37th New Jersey Vols., which on August 



* 



46 ADJUT a nt-<;eneral's report. 

28th were replaced by a detachment of one hundred men of the 11th 
Conn. Vols, under command of Capt Craszynski, relieved in its turn 

on Nov. 25th by Co. M, 8d l'< an. Artillery, under command of Capt. 
Korte. 

Brig. Gen, Ingalla, Chief Quartermaster, Armies in the Field, sup- 
plied a tog and a train of fifty wagOUS, with a promise of farther trans- 
portation when required. Beside these wagons, the lour artillery teams 
of Capt. Korte have been habitually used. This battery was organ- 
ized by Gen. Butler for the purpose of moving all his heavy gun 
regular armament being two 6-inch siege howitzer-, which themselves 
would hardly require transportation other than that furnished by the 
Quartermaster's Department Capt. Korte has been eager for service, 
and much benefit has been derived from this organization. 

Lieut. Col. N. L. White was appointed by General Butler, Acting 
Inspector General of my command on June 29th, and beside- his other 
duties, has discharged the functions of that office in a thorough man- 
ner. 

Capt. S. P. Hatfield, was placed in command of the depot, assisted 
by 1st Lieut. W. C. Faxon and 1st Lieut. C. Gillette all of 1st Con- 
necticut Artillery; Capt. Hatfield had commanded a siege battery 
during a part of the Peninsular Campaign of 1862, and had been 
Ordnance Officer of my brigade in the Defenses of "Washington for 
more than a year. To his high professional attainments and ener- 
getic character, and to the zeal and ability of his assistants, the excel- 
lent administration of his department during the campaign, is to be 
attributed. 

The general system for the service and supply of the batteries was 
the following. The companies and parts of companies serving the 
batteries situated within convenient distances, were placed under com- 
mand ol* a field officer of the 1st Connecticut Artillery, who received his 
orders as to firing from the local commander. In other respects he 
received his orders from these head-quarters. The battery comman- 
ders forwarded daily to their Majors reports showing the amount of 
ammunition on hand at last report. Amount received during the 
twenty four hours, amount expended, and amount remaining on hand. 

These reports were collected by orderlies from my head-quarters, and 
usually reached the depot about noon. A train was at once fitted out to 
supply the deficiencies below a certain number of rounds (usually one 
hundred pergen or mortar) ordered to be kept in the field magazines. 
These trains reported to the field officers, already informed by tele- 
gram of their destination and time of starting, and were conducted 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 47 

after dark under their direction to their proper batteries. Although 
some 1100 tons of ammunition, hauled an average distance of nearly 
seven miles by wagon, have already been fired during the campaign, in 
no single instance has a battery failed to be amply supplied for ordi- 
nary or even extraordinary demands, and in no case has a useless 
accumulation of ammunition occurred. 

The question of responsibility for ordnance property, so difficult of 
convenient adjustment, has also been very simply settled for the siege 
train. The whole material remains charged to the Ordnance Officer. 
Memorandum receipts, which are destroyed when the property is ac- 
counted for to him, being only required from battery commanders. 
No time is thus expended upon unnecessary papers which with the 
constant transfers of ordnance from one battery to another would 
have entailed great labor upon company commanders, had the usual 
system been adopted. 

Knowing that the rations likely to be drawn from the neighboring 
Commissaries of subsistence would be inferior to those which would 
be supplied by an independent organization, I appointed my Regi- 
mental Quartermaster Lieutenant (now Capt.) G. P. Mason, 1st Conn. 
Artillery, A. A. Q. M. and A. A. C. S. and directed him to supply 
the command. This he has done to perfection with a train of only 
17 wagons. Although the line has often exceeded fifteen miles in 
length, the water transportation has enabled him to get his supplies 
and forage to the depot without hauling, and bis own good judgment 
and energy have done the rest. 

Advantage has been taken of the comparative stability of the com- 
mand to have all the regimental sick properly cared for by Surgeon 
S. W. Skinner, 1st Connecticut Artillery, who has organized one of 
the best field hospitals I have ever seen. The patients have varied 
from thirty to seventy in number. By avoiding the sending of those 
lightly diseased, to General Hospital, much has unquestionably been 
done to keep up the numbers of the command. The comforts of the 
patients have been quite unusual for the field, owing to the attention 
of the Surgeon in charge, and to the efforts of Chaplain S. F. Jarvis 
1st Connecticut Artillery, who has actively exerted himself in their 
behalf. 

Asst. Surgeon J. S. Delavan has devoted himself to the sick of the 
regiment in the batteries in front of Petersburg, and Asst. Surgeon 
N. Matson until broken down by his exertions, to those in the com- 
mand on the lines of Bermuda Hundred. Although so much scat- 



48 ADJUTANT-GENE II A i/s REPORT. 

ten.!. I believe few troops have enjoyed as good medical care during 
this campaign as mine. 

Tor the prompt and? accurate transaction of the various office work 
of the command, I am indebted t<> Cap!. B. P. Learned, 1st Connec- 
ticut Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-GeneraL 

The following changes have been mad*.' in the organization during 
the campaign. On June 28th, Companies A and II, 13th N. Y. Ar- 
tillery under command of (apt. Win. Pendrell, were assigned to my 
command by Major-4 reneral Butler. They were placed in the lines of 
Bermuda Hundred. Ten Companies of the 4th N. Y. Artillery, 
Lieut. Col. Allock, Commanding, aggregate 1072 men, were added 
by Gen. Hunt on July 1 -1th. On the loth, I placed Company A, Capt. 
McKeel, on duty at the siege train depot, and on the 2'Jth Co. M. 
Capt. Morrison, on the same duty. Three companies, as shown 
in the table below, served batteries, the rest of the regiment did excel- 
lent service in making gabions, fascines, magazines, and in construct- 
ing some of the siege batteries. They were detached on Aug. 4th. 
On Oct. 16th, I was ordered to report, for my command of the Siege 
Artillery, Army of the James, to the Officer commanding the lines 
of Bermuda Hundred, instead of direct to General Butler as heretofore. 
On Nov. 15th, the 3rd Connecticut Independent Battery, commanded 
by Capt. Gilbert, was temporarily attached to my regiment by an or- 
der from the War Department. It was placed on duty with siege 
guns in the lines of City Point. On Dec. 17th, Companies E and G, 
3rd Pennysvania Artillery, commanded by Major F. Von Schilling, 
and stationed at Fort Converse were added to the command. 



BATTLE OF PETERSBURG MINE. 

The organization just described was originally made under a press- 
ure which, owing to the constant demands for siege artillery in front 
of Petersburg, increased its difficulties. The batteries and the am- 
munition were hauled an average distance of nearly eight miles, over 
roads extremely jdusty but otherwise good. The following table 
exhibits the amount of siege artillery, with the corresponding dates, 
put into position preparatory to the explosion of the mine on the front 
of the 9th Corps on July 30th. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY 



49 



The designations of the batteries refer to the official sketch of the 
line prepared on September 13th, 1861, by Major Michler, Chief 
Engineer, Array of the Potomac. 



Date. 

1864. 



Company. 



Com*dg Officer. 



June 20, 
" 24, ' 
" 24,' 
" 25 ' 



I,"' 1st Conn. Art*y-> Capt. Burton, 

D M « K 



27, --F,» 



11 27,1 



July 6, 



B," 



-CI 


6, 


'A,' 


H U 


u 


8, 


'<V 


u ic 


" 


9, 


'G,' 


<< u 


(1 


9, 


'G' 


u « 


" 


25, 


•M.' 


) U (1 


•« 


28. 


'K,' 


' 4th N.Y. Art'y 


«( 


88, 


-<v 


1st Conn. " 


41 


28, 


' A,' 


it '< 


[< 


29, 


'II.' 


4th N. Y. " 



Armament. 



-pdr. Parrotts, 



3 

Brigham, 4 
Lieut. Jackson, 4 8- inch Mortars, 



5 Coehorns, 

| 3 S^-par. Parrotts, 
( 4 8-inch Mortars, 



6 4^-ineh Guns, 



« 29, ;'C" 



Lincoln, 

Williams 



Capt. Dow, 

Maj. Trumbull. 
Capt. Brooker, 
1 Brooker, 



" Gillett, 4 S-inch Mortars. 
Lieut. Sargent, 2 8-inch Mortars, 

" Andrews, -5 Coehorns, 
Capt. Osborne, 1 13-inch Mortar, 

•' Pratt, 6 4}-inch Guns, 

" Gould, 16 Coehorns. 

" Pierce, [10 10 inch Mortars, 
Lieut. Patterson 6 8 M " 

• 'apt. Brown, |6 4^ " Guns, 
Lt. McPherson, 6 Coehorns, 



Locality and Remarks. 



I 



Battery 4. 

1. 

" 10. 

3 to Battery 9. 

2 to " near 

Fort McGilvray. 

Battery 5. 

To assume command 
of Batteries on line of 
18th Corps. 

Battery 17. 
To assume command 
of Batteries on line of 
9th and 5th Corps. 

Iln front of Battery 14. 

'Near Battery 11. 
" " 12. 

On R. R-, near Battery 8- 

Fort Morton. 

Near Battery 11. 

Near Fort Rice. 

Near Battery 20. 

Fort Sedgwick. 

In front of Battery 15. 



Total, 



81 Pieces. 



From the time of going into position until the explosion of the 
mine, on General Burnside's front, the fire of most of these batteries 
was incessant, and their practice was all that could be desired. 

On July 30th the mine was sprung at four hours, forty-five min- 
utes A. M., and a heavy cannonade was instantly opened and con- 
tinued until about ten hours, thirty minutes A. M., when ic gradually 
ceased, the assault of the Infantry having failed, and the attack being 
discontinued. The part assigned to the Artillery, to keep down the 
fire of the enemy upon the flanks of the column of attack, and to 
keep back his reinforcements, was successfully executed. 

This battle was probably the first in which spherical case from 
heavy mortars was used. The expedient, putting thirty 12-pdr. 
canister shot under the bursting charge of the ten inch shells, was 
of great utility, their steady fire keeping quiet the most dreaded 
flanking batteries of the enemy's line. 



50 



ADJUTANT-GENERALS REPORT. 



The following table exhibits the amount of fire of the different 
batteries under my command daring the battle, and also during the 
entire siege up to July 31st. 



Bath BO 


Total firing to July 31st. 


Fire during battle of July 30. 


(Sec preceding table for 


fa 5 


Q 




*t 


c 
E 

O 




- 


V T. 






Armament ami Com- 


§.£ 


a d 


-x. ax. 


B* 




S.h 


a o 


ax 


C ■£ ) © ■£ 


o 


manding Officers.) 


^ 


-i ~ 


22 


4£ 


) % 


o 
O 


il 


+ & 




3.S 


co 55 


o 


No. 1, 


888 












65 












Hear No. 3, - 






45 












19 








No. 4, 


1361 












176 












No. 5, - 


2116 








2197 




206 








174 




No. 9, near Ft. McGilvray, 
























121 


No. 10,- 










2145 












337 




Near No. 11, 










1023 


27 i 










136 


2C7 


Near No. 12, - 












1507 












334 


Near No. 14, 










836 












259 




Fort Morton, - 




881 












331 










Near No. 15, 












816 












315- 


Near No. 17, - 




534 












216 










Fort Rice, - 








360 












360 






Near No. 20, - 










217 












217 




Fort Sedgwick, 




195 












300 












4310 


1060 


45 


360 


6418 


3869 


447 


847 


19 


360 


1123 


1037 



The aggregate number of rounds fired in front of Petersburg up to 
July 31st, was thus 16,062 rounds, amounting to about 300 tons, and 
during the battle of July 30th, 3,833 rounds, amounting to about 75 
tons. 

The firing on the Bermuda Hundred lines between the arrival of 
the siege train and July 31st, nearly ceased, amounting only to nine- 
teen 10-ineh mortar shells, six 4^-inch shells, and three 20-pdr. Par- 
rot t shells. 

Thus the entire expenditures from the opening of the campaign to 
July 31st, was 18,061 rounds, amounting to 325 tons. 

At 11 : 35 P. M., July 30th, 1864, 1 received a telegram from Gen. 
Hunt, to move with urgent haste certain siege ordnance and siege 
material from the batteries at Petersburg to my depot at Broadway 
Landing on Appomattox river. The following table exhibits what 
was moved. The distances are accurately taken from the engineer 
maps of the Army of the Potomac. It will be seen that the mean 
distance per piece, exactly computed, is eight miles. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 



51 



Name of Battery. 

(See sketch hy Msij. 

Michler, dated Sep. 

13th, 1864.) 


Armament. 


Distance 
to Depot. 
(Miles.) 


Distance 
for one 
Piece. 

(Miles.) 


Remarks. 


Fort Sedgwick, 
Near Battery 20, 
Near Fort Rice, 
Batterv 17, - 
Near Battery 18, 
Fort Morton, 
Near Battery 14, 
Battery 4, - 
Battery 1, 


6 4i-inch Guns, 
6 8-inch Mortars, 
10 10-inch Mortars, 
6 4^-inch Guns, 
6 Coehorns, 
G 4^-inch Guns, 
4 8-inch Mortars, 

3 30-pdr. Parrotts, 

4 30-pdr. Parrotts, 


9.3 
9.1 
8.5 
8.0 
8.8 
8.0 
8.2 
5.4 
4.0 


55.8 
54.6 
85.0 
48.0 
52.8 
48.0 
32.8 
16.2 
16.0 


5th Corps front. 
5th " " 
5th " " 
5th " " 
5th " " 
9th " " 
9th " " 
18th " " 
18th " " 


Total, - 
On R. R. near Bat- 
tery 3, - 


51 

1 13-inch Mortar, 




409.2 


Sent 6 miles to City Point 


Total, - 


52 









The seven siege guns, etc., in Batteries 1 and 4, were moved by 
transportation — light artillery teams and wagons — furnished by Col. 
Piper, Chief of Artillery, 18th Corps. 

The 13 -inch mortar, which was served on a railroad truck car 
made so strongly as to resist the shock of firing, was drawn to City 
Point by a locomotive. The rest of the material was moved by the 
four artillery teams of Capt. Korte, and by a train furnished by Gen. 
Ingalls, as follows : my regular train, 50 wagons ; an extra train of 60 
wagons, furnished for contingencies arising from the battle, upon my 
requisition on July 30th; and an extra train of 60 wagons and 18 
eight-mule teams furnished at 8 : 30 A. M., July 31st, in response to* 
a telegram of mine dated 1 : 35 A. M. of that date. Total, 170 
wagons and 22 teams. 

The orders to move the material were received by me at 1 1 : 35 
P. ^1., July 30th. By the aid of the telegraph, matters were so well 
arranged that the trains began arriving at the depot at daylight of 
July 31st, and continued to do so as fast as they could be unloaded,, 
up to 2 : 30 A. M. of August 1st, when the last was received, — total 
period occupied in removal, 27 hours. 

The material was all brought in Government wagons, except the 
guns and the 10-inch mortars, the latter of which were loaded on 
mortar wagons. The rebels did not discover the movement, although 
many of the batteries were in the very front of our line. The aggre- 
gate weight transported was 225 tons. 

The material was shipped as fast as unloaded. By noon of August 
1st, 36 hours after the first telegram, everything was afloat. 

The labor at the depot was performed by two companies of the 4th 



52 adjutant-general's report. 

N. Y. Artillery, and Bix companies of the "Till N. J. Volunteers, — th« 
latter working two at a time, — aided occasionally by the companies of 
1st Conn. Artillery who had served and moved the batteries. 

Three wharves were used, which were at this date mere crib gang- 
ways. 

The very unusual promptness of this movement was due, 1-t. to 
the facilities furnished by the telegraph ; 2d, to th< ample transporta- 
tion furnished by Gen. [ngalls; 3d, to the intelligence and energy of 
Captain (now Major) Brooker, 1st Conn. Artillery, commanding the 
batteries on 5th and 9th Corps front; of Major Trumbull, 1st Conn. 
Artillery, commanding the batteries on 18th Corps front; of Lieut. 
Col. White, 1st Conn. Artillery, Acting Inspector-General; and of 
the officers commanding the batteries. 

Everything was brought away, — artillery, ammunition, implement-, 
platforms, mantlets, — nothing was damaged or lost. To Capt. Hat- 
field, 1st Conn. Artillery, my Ordnance Officer, the credit is due for 
the rapid loading of so much material on transports. Thus ended the 
first period of the siege. 

SUBSEQUENT OPERATIONS IN FRONT OF RICHMOND. 

At this date I had thirty-three (33) guns and mortars in position 
on the Bermuda Hundred lines, and twenty-nine (29) in front of 
Petersburg. The following table exhibits the modifications, which 
occurred during August, September and October, in both armies. 

It is inserted to give an idea of the amount of work constantly 
called for in addition to the firing. 

Later changes can not properly be reported at present. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY 



53 





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54 



adjutant-general's report. 



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FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 



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56 adjutant-general's report. 

The following table exhibits the transfers of Companies serving the 
Siege Batteries, during the three months considered, — when moved 
withoo^gnna. If moved with guns, the changes of station appear 
in the preceding table. Later transfers cannot properly be made 
known. 



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G>«a3S«*£asa«3aaa3;ta**33S4 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 57 

Since the battle of the Mine, the firing in front of Petersburg, and 
near the James River, has been heavy. 

The average weight of iron thrown daily has been, during August, 
5.2 tons ; during September, 7.8 tons ; during October, 4.5 tons ; dur- 
ing November, 2.7 tons ; during December, 2.1 tons ; during January, 
1.6 tons; during February, 1.1 tons. 

The aggregate number of rounds fired during this period has thus 
been 37,264, amounting to about 793 tons of iron. The total expendi- 
tures of ammunition from the beginning of the campaign to March 
1st, 1865, has been 55,325 rounds, amounting to 1118 tons of iron. 

Upon the Petersburg lines the firing has been so frequent as to 
render it difficult to select special instances for mention. At all houra 
of the day and night sudden artillery battles have occurred, often in- 
volving the entire line, and demanding the expenditure of many tons 
of ammunition. This has usually arisen from the position of the 
right of our lines, which is necessarily enfiladed from the Chesterfield 
Heights, an advantage that has given the rebel batteries there a strong 
temptation to open fire. It is beyond a doubt that our practice, espe- 
cially in mortars, is superior to theirs, and these fights have thus uni- 
formly terminated in our favor. Upon the occasion of their explod- 
ing a mine near Battery 12, on August 5th, an unusually heavy fire 
occurred, as also at other times when they attempted to interfere with 
the use of our military railroad, or we tried to interrupt their working 
parties, or to stop picket firing by shelling Petersburg. 

General Butler's canal at Dutch Gap, has also been the scene of 
much firing. On Aug. 13th, just after the work began, the rebel fleet 
came down, and in conjunction with the Howlett-house batteries and 
some field guns on Cox's Hill, opened a very heavy concentric fire 
upon the gap from an arc of about 17C°. My James River batteries 
were very active, and finally succeeded in driving off the rams, and in 
silencing the Howlett-house battery so effectually that the experiment 
was not repeated. 

About August 20th, however, the rebels planted some Coehorn 
mortals in a secure spot north-west of the canal, within good range, 
and after that time kept up a desultory fire upon the Gap, doing very 
little damage however, owing to their want of skill in serving the 
mortars. Not one in a hundred of their shells have fallen in the 
canal, where good artillerists would certainly have thrown one in five. 

After the advance upon Fort Harrison, the rebel fleet habitually 
lay in the reach near the " Graveyard," in plain sight of our lines, oc- 
casionally firing upon them. A surprise was planned for them by 



58 



adjutant-general's report. 



Genera] Butler, whose Chief Engineer, Major Michie, erected a bat- 
tery commanding their position. During the night of October 21st> 
three 80-pdr. Parrotfta, Berved by Co. C, 1st Conn. Artillery, and 
Ashby's battery of four 20-pdr. Parrotts, the whole under command 
of Capt Pierce, Lsfl Conn. Artillery, were placed in position, and at 
daylight opened raddenly upon the fleet, at a range of about 1500 
yards. The effect iras excellent. The rebel papers admit thai a gun- 
carriage was hit on the gunboat " Drury," by a shell, which wounded 
five men ; that the smokestack of the ram "Fredericksburg" was con- 
siderably perforated, and six men on her wounded, and that a plate 
was started on one of the ironclads. It is believed from the number 
of times the wooden boat was hit, — sixteen, — that her injuries were 
more serious than admitted. Certain it is that the fleet all steamed 
away as f'a-t a- possible, and that the wooden boats have not again 
exposed themselves in this reach. Our batteries were heavily fired 
upon by the rebel land batteries, but no damage was done except to 
wound one man. 

On September 29th, the army of the James crossed James River, 
and the 18th corps captured several guns, thirteen of which were 
brought to the rear, in large measure through the exertions of Major 
Cook and Lieuts. Gillette and Pond, 1st Conn. Artillery. The fol- 
lowing is a list of these guns : Seven iron 6-pdrs.. old model ; one 
iron 6-pdr., new model, resembling our 3 inch ordnance gun ; one 8 
inch Columbiad ; one 32-pdr. navy smooth bore ; one army 32-pdr. 
old model, banded and rifled; one 12-pdr. iron gun, made in Rich- 
mond, banded and rilled, throwing a shell weighing about 40 lbs. ; — 
it weighed 6700 lbs., and was mounted on a siege carriage. Also one 
30-pdr. Richmond gun, banded like the rest, and like our 30 pdr. 
Parrot t. except that the front end of the re-inforce was beveled off. 
It had a swell of the muzzle, and weighed 4700 lbs., — date 1864. 
A caisson for its ammunition was also captured. This gun and the 
captured ammunition was retained for our own use. The other guns 
were sent to Fort Monroe. 

The most important event during January, on these lines, was the 
attempt of the rebel fleet to pass the obstructions in James River, on 
the night of January 23d, when I think it may fairly be claimed that 
the 1st Conn. Artillery prevented a serious disaster. Subsequent 
changes in ordnance render it proper to give the details of the affair. 
Three rams, the wooden gunboat "Drury," a small steam torpedo- 
boat, and perhaps more, passed Fort Brady about 8 P. M., under cover 
of the darkness. They received about 25 shots from the fort, — arma- 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 



59 



ment two 100-pdr. Parrotts and three 30-pdr. Parrotts. The fort was 
instantly opened upon by the rebel land batteries, mounting about a 
dozen guns, and their fire soon disabled one of the 100-pdr. guns. 
The fleet passed on to a point near the rebel Howlett battery, out of 
range of Fort Brady. My batteries below Fort Brady were three in 
number, — Parsons and Wilcox, — armament one 100-pdr. Parrott, and 
one 10-inch sea-coast mortar; Spofford, armament one 30-pdr. Parrott, 
placed in position about 7 A. M., and Sawyer, armament one 100-pdr. 
Parrott and two 10-inch sea-coast mortars. About 10 P. M., a ram 
succeeded in reaching and began removing the obstructions, receiving 
31 shots from the mortar in Wilcox, and 9 from those in Sawyer, with 
musketry fire from all the spare artillery-men while so engaged. At 
3 A. M ., one ram passed the obstructions and anchored about 600 yards 
above Sawyer, where she remained for 45 minutes. This position was 
only exposed to mortar fire ; one shell fired at 60° elevation struck her, 
and she immediately moved up the river; 19 shells had been fired at 
her while lying in this position. Daring the night 44 rounds from 
the 100-pdr., and 24 rounds from the mortar in Parsons and Wilcox, 
and 3 rounds from the 100-pdr. in Sawyer, were fired at the fleet 
above the obstructions. The darkness prevented the effect of this 
lire from being known. At daylight two rams and the "Drury" were 
discovered aground near left bank, some 1500 yards above Parsons. 
Fire was at once opened from that battery with long percussion shell 
from the 100-pdr. The second shot struck the "Drury," and the 
third exploded her magazine, completely destroying her. The fol- 
lowing table shows the fire upon the fleet after daylight, before it es- 
caped up the river, about noon : 





c 

< 

— 


3 

D 
S 

3 


o 


3 


11 

6 a 
copn 


C/3 

73 

oS 

o 

c 


Commanding Officer. 


Parsons and TVilcox, 

Spofford, 

Sawyer, 


57 
21 


30 

7 


25 
31 


2 
2 


6227 

! 


1500 Lt. H. A. Pratt, 1st Conn. Artillery. 
1800 Lt. C. N. Silliman, 1st Conn. ArtilY 
2500 Lt. E. P. Mason, 1st Conn. Artillery. 


Total, 


78!37 


56 


4 


62 27 







As soon as the rams could get afloat, they retreated out of range 
near Howlett Battery, leaving the torpedo boat aground. About 3 
A. M. on the 25th, they escaped up the river past Fort Brady, receiv- 



*>0 adjutant-general's report. 

ing a number of rounds io the darkness, several of which struck 
them. 

The ammunition nsed in this - nt consisted in part < f -olid 

shot, and in part of BhelJ — percussion and time and ct rto> 

y the !iu«- of fire, when th<- rams - ound,wai . and 

the ] inced off without 'penetrating. Officers on picket 

directly opposite, i 1 that the, armor was Btarted and par- 

tially ripped off in a numb 

During the I Fort Brady and Parsons 

and v under a rery heavy fire from the rebel laud batte- 

ries, Tl were killed in the former, and a large nir 

tly injured from fin 

Too much commendation can i given to Captain Pierc •. com- 

manding Fort Brady, and to Li< Pi . M - d and Silli 

commanding the other batl ent conduct The 

total firing including those fired in reply to t: land bar 

was about 500 rounds of siege and sea-coast ammunition. Lieut. W. 
G. Ball, 13th N. Y. Artillery, also moved a 20-pdr. Parrott (field 
gun) to the bank of the river and fired So round- at a range of about 
1,400 yards with creditable zeal. 

EXPEDITION TO FORT FISHER. 

At six hours thirty minutes P. ML, on January 5th, I received an 
order from General Grant, to embark a siege train which ultimately 
prov destined for Fort Fisher. I was to acccompany it. with 

a sufficient detail of artillerymen from my command, and a company 
of volunteer engineers from Genera] Benham's Brigade, and al<o a 
small detachment from General Graham's Naval Brigade. During 
January 6th, I was waiting transportation, but removed three com- 
pany . : ' . ind L.) 1st Conn. Artillery, from the line. 6 , 
and also two 30-pdr. Parrott- and four Coehorn Mortar-. The 
propeller C. C. Leary. 841 tons, reported at 8 A. M. on January 
7th — and my Ordnance Officer at < a loading her from both 
»ides with all po-sible despatch with the Ordnance. They employed 
about 1 50 men. The propeller Scott, 1086 tons, reported at 3 P. M.. 
with 50,000 feet of lumber on board. By s P. If. she was ready to 
sail with two companies (280 men) and 86 mule-. At seven hours 
thirty minutes A.M. of January 8th, the propeller Gov. Chase, 74C 
tons, reported : at noon -he was ready to Bail with two companies 
(282 men) and 41 animal-. During the evening the three -teamers 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. Gl 

with my head-quarters on the Leary dropped down to City Point, 
where I received written orders from Gen. Grant to report to Gen. 
Terry. My command consisted of 20 officers 568 men, 77 animals, 
12 wagons, 10 30 pound Parrotts, 20 Coehorns, with 8,000 rounds for 
former and 6,C00 for latter, 50,000 feet lumber, etc. etc. We took 
19 days rations, 4 being cooked. We sailed at daylight of January 
Oth, and reached Fort Monroe that evening. On January 10th we 
were detained by a severe storm — but sailed at 8 A. M. of January 
11th — arriving at Beaufort N. C. on the following day in time to join 
the fleet, then starting for Fort Fisher, where we arrived about 5 
P. M. During January loth we were ordered to remain on board. 

On January 14th I put the Engineer Company on shore, with 
87 animals, rations, forage, etc. The sea was too rough to land the 
guns. The steamer was anchored, and a warp of three inch rope, 
120 fathoms long, was secured to the beach. The men were pulled 
ashore in surf boats, and the animals slung, hoisted overboard, and 
towed ashore by the warp. On the 15th the sea was smoother. I 
had brought three launches and a detachment of 35 men of Gen. Gra- 
ham's Naval Brigade, under Lieut. Neilson, to aid in disembarking my 
train. I also received all the assistance required from the Navy ; 
Acting Master, Z. L. Tanner, aided by Acting Ensign L. Pope, both 
of the Rhode Island, took charge of removing the stores, ete. from 
the ship's side to the beach, and labored most faithfully and skillfully 
on January 14th and 15th, to accomplish all that was possible. On 
January 15th, three 30-pdr. Parrotts, complete with ammunition, etc., 
another company, the rest of the animals, the wagons, etc. etc., were 
unloaded. The guns were unloaded in the following manner : — They 
were raised from the hold and slung overboard by using purchases 
from the mast-head, and the yards strengthened by a preventer- 
brace. They were carefully lowered overboard and placed on the 
launch, (one at a trip,) with very considerable risk owing to the roll- 
ing of the ship. The launch was then pulled along the warp to the 
edge of the surf and the gun rolled overboard. It was then dragged 
up by about 200 men pulling upon a rope secured to it. It was a 
slow and dangerous process, and only possible in a very smooth sea. 
The carriages, ammunition, etc. were landed in a similar way. 

Fort Fisher was carried by assault on the morning of January 
15th, and the disembarkation of my train was at once suspended. It 
has since been sent back to these lines. 

The following is a list of the guns captured in Fort Fisher. 



62 



ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S REPORT 



Smooth 1 ce. 


Killed Ordnance. 




Good 


- 




order. 
Disabled 


jj 


ll-iia-li Bn 

10 M Coluinbiad, 

10 " S. C. Mortar, 

8 " Coluinbiad, 
82-pdr., Iron, 
32 " Canoiiade, 
24 ,l Iron, 
24 " C'ueliorn, (Iron,) 
12 " Howitzer, U. S., 

u ■• M 1.1.. 
12 " Gun, 1. S., 

6 " 

6 " " Iron, 
1. 5-inch Gun, 
Volley Gun, 


I 

1 
11 1 
3 4 
1 
1 1 
4 

1 
a 

2 

i 

1 


19 

7 
■ 

a 

J 

i 

3 
•J 
2 

1 

1 


8-inch Armstrong Gun, 150-pdr, 

Blakely, 
7 " Brooks' Double Bands, 
G.4-inch Parrott, U. &.. 
6.4-inch Brooks' Double Bands, 
6.4-inch Single Band, 
eli, No Bands, 

■h, <; 
4.6-inch, Blakely, 

h Parrott", (No. 2,) 
4. 2-inch. Bai 

3-inch Banded, Kichmond, 
3-inch Whitworth, 
2.2-inch " muzzle loader, 


l 
l 
1 
l 

4 
4 
1 

1 
1 
1 

2 

1 
4 


2 

■1 
2 

1 


1 
1 
3 
1 
4 
6 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
4 


Total, 


49 11 


• 




24 7 


81 



Many of the carriages of the guns in good order were disabled. 
Immense quantities of ammunition, ordnance stores, etc. were taken. 



ORDNANCE AND GUNNERY. 

Considering the large amount of firing, the injuries suffered by out 
guns have been unusually small — being limited to blowing off the 
muzzle of a 30-pdr. Parrott about a foot from the face — probably by 
a premature explosion of the sheU ; it \va> cut smooth with a cold 
chisel, and the accuracy of the piece seems not at all impaired; and 
to the bursting of the 5.8-inch Sawyer gun, which occurred on Au- 
gust 5th, after firing ten rounds. The gun had already been fired a 
large number of times at Fort Monroe. It burst into four principal 
parts — the largest including the trunnions and all in front of them 
remained in its place on the carriage — the next piece, forming the 
bottom of the bore near the breech, fell between the cheeks — the left 
half of the top — which split as usual through the vent, fell upon the 
top of a return of the parapet a short distance from the gun — the 
right half was thrown some 200 yards entirely outside the fort. The 
vent was evidently defective, showing a double cavity, much enlarged- 
The strength of the gun being doubtful, it was fired by quick-match ( 
consequently no one was injured. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 



63 



The only novelty in the service of the Siege Artillery requiring 
special notice has been the method of mounting the 13 inch Mortar. 
The extreme weight of which, (17,000 lbs.) renders it unmanageable. 
Maj. Gen. Butler conceived the idea of serving it upon a railroad 
car, and ordered one made as an experiment. The first car broke 
under the shock. A second, prepared by the Engineers in charge of 
the Military Railroad, answered its purpose admirably. It consisted 
of an ordinary truck car, strengthened by additional beams tied 
strongly by iron rods and covered by iron plating. Fired with 14 lbs 
of powder, the mortar recoiled upon the car less than two feet, and 
upon the track some ten or twelve feet. It was a decided success. 
On one occasion three different observers reported that a shell burst 
under a gun and blew it and its carriage entirely above the parapet. 
Certain it is that the mortar was much dreaded by the enemy. 

During the campaign, it has been necessary to conduct certain ex- 
periments, to facilitate the fire of the batteries. Among them was 
the deducing of a table of ranges for the 8-inch Siege Mortar which 
differs materially from the old model in this respect, owing to the sub- 
stitution of the elliptical for the Gomer chamber. The ranges were 
determined with care, and the following table exhibits the result. 

RANGES OF EIGHT INCH SIEGE MORTAR. 
(Model, 1861.) 



Charge. 


Projectile. 


Elevation. 


Range. 


Time. 


Remarks. 


Lbs. oz. 


Shell. 


' 


Yards. 


Seconds. 




8 


u 


45 


360 


8.0 


Ranges obtained 


12 


a 


u 


703 


12.5 


from experiments 


1 


a 


it 


1082 


15.0 


conducted near 


1 4 


u 


a 


1412 


17.0 


Petersburg, by the 


1 8 


a 


« 


1741 


18.5 


1st Conu. Artillery 


1 12 


« 


« 


1985 


20.0 


in Sept. 1864. 


2 


« 


« 


2225 


21.0 





Another experiment was to test a new shell invented by Mr. 
Pevey. It consists of two concentric shells thinner than usual, and 
connected firmly by studs. The open space between is filled with 
small iron balls or incendiary composition. Shells for trial, both 10 
inch and 8 inch were ordered by Gen. Butler, and the result indicated 
by bursting them over water and over a dusty plain was highly satis- 
factory. In my judgment they will break into more than double the 



64 



A D J U T A N T - (. B N \E R A L ' 8 REPORT. 



Dumber of fragments of the ordinan 



isequently hare 



fully double the effect They bore the Bhock without injury, although 

one 10 inch shell w;i> thrown from a Sea CoaSl Mortar with a eh;; 

of about seven lbs. of powder. 

Another experiment was to test the li,L r ht balls furnished for our 8 inch 
Mortars. It was found that on ground of ordinary hardness, do larger 
charge than six oz. of powder, gii log a range of only 255 yard-, could 
be used without causing the ball to break into fragments from the 
force of its fall. This range is entirelj too -hurt for our purpos 
Possibly by using an elevation less than 45 ,the range might be 
lengthened, but in my opinion the balls arc not made of sufficient 
strength to be practically useful. 

Other important experiments with new projectiles incendiary, dou- 
ble and triple bursting, etc., have been made, but the results are 
withheld for the present. 

The subject of Mantlets to protect the gunners has received con- 
siderable attention. Those furnished by the engineer department arc 
made of rope, five feet by four and one half feet, and about six inches 
thick, weighing about 600 lbs. each. They are excellent for protec- 
tion, but their great weight makes them difficult to handle. In my 
judgment it might be safely reduced by lessening their thick' 
The penetration in them of an elongated bullet from a Springfield 
rifled musket at 20 paces is less than 3 inches. I had also an oppor- 
tunity to see the effect of a 10-pdr. rifled projectile at GUO yards 
range upon a rope mantlet made at Fort Monroe, and only about 4 
inches thick. The shot was deflected, breaking the lashing of the 
mantlet, and throwing down the pole supports, but was so much 
checked in velocity by so doing as to then knock a man down without 
seriously injuring him. In other cases these thin mantlets have been 
penetrated even by musket balls where the ropes were not closely 
lashed together, but the experience of the campaign has convinced 
me that a thickness of 4. 5 inches is, all things considered, the best 
which can be given them. 

In this connection it may be well to call attention to the fact, that 
we have had great difficulty in drawing heavy guns and supplies 
through the covered ways leading to Fort Sedgwick, owing to the 
sharp curves at the angles. In such places security must in part be 
sacrificed to facility of travel, or great delays may result in moving 
siege guns. Our guns have been more than once dismounted in turn- 
ing these corners. 

As most of the magazines have been made under the superintend- 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 65 

dence of my officers, it may be well to state that the plan adopted, 
putting them in secure positions and making the chamber entirely be- 
low ground, roofed by heavy logs and covered by dirt about six feet 
thick, has been found to be both simple and safe. Boards have sel- 
dom been used either for the sides or the floor, which is made to drain 
into a barrel sunk near the entrance. The usual dimensions, in the 
clear, have been six feet wide by five feet deep, length to vary accord- 
ing to capacity required. In no instance has one of them been blown 
up, although often hit by the rebel projectiles, and even in heavy 
rains, such as that of August 15th, at Petersburg when several sold- 
iers in the low bottom were washed away and drowned, very little 
loss of ammunition has occurred from leakage. 

The large amount of mortar firing during this campaign has dis- 
closed one defect which should be corrected. The friction primers 
are driven out of the vent with great violence by the explosion, and 
occasion serious danger to the cannoniers. One valuable officer of 
my regiment, Lieut. Andrews, lost the sight of one of his eyes from; 
this cause. Another, Lieut. Jackson, had a narrow escape, being 
severely cut on the forehead, while the instances of injury more or- 
less serious to enlisted men, will, I think fully amount to a dozen 
The vents should be covered by a cap similar to that used for the- 
Whitworth gun, and the line of metal should be permanently and ac- 
curately marked on all Mortars. Moreover what is not the case now, 
some convenient hook should be arranged for guiding the lanyard 
into a direction perpendicular to the vent. In other respects I re- 
gard the new Mortars and carriages as vast improvements over the 
old models, in fact, as perfect. 

The siege guns and carriages now in use are generally excellent. 
Much trouble, however, has arisen from the breaking of the new ele- 
vating screws of the 30-pdr. Parrotts, which are ill adapted to their 
purpose. A more general defect, which applies to rifled guns of all 
calibres, is that little or no care is used in their sights. For a sharp- 
shooter who is not expected to fire more than five or six hundred yards 
with his rifle, we supply accurate globe sights and a fine telescope. 
For a rifled gun which is to fire three thousand yards, we give sights 
far coarser than those of any old smooth-bore musket. Rifled artil- 
lery can never accomplish all that it ought, until accurate telescopic 
globe sights are furnished. 

Several precautions to insure rapidity and precision of mortar fire, 
have been suggested by the intelligent observation of Capt. Osborne, 
Lieut. Jackson, and other officers commanding batteries. Thus a 
5 



6ti adjutant-general's retort. 

wooden-handled steel BCraper, made in t Ik • shape of a hoc. with a 
double edge, — curvature 6.5 inches, — was found to reduce more than 
one-h:iH' the time required to serve the 13-inch mortar. Although 
the fuses for this mortal r, they wen made to almost 

invariably burn by driving them gently so as nut to shake out the 
composition, and by placing a train of dry powder from the top of the 
shell to the fuse, and another, where the fuse would strike the bottom 
of the bore in rolling out. — both made to n main in place by wetting 
the iron. It was also found that wooden . . iuld not be sunned; 

that the powder should be well stirred in the barrel before tiring, and 
that, in inserting the Coehorn -hell, its paper fuse should be placed 
near to the top of the bore to insure its ignition. 

We may derive some u>« fid hints from the rebel .-mooth-bore am- 
munition. Thus : their Coehorn shells are provided with ears, which 
is a great improvement over our system of banding. The interior 
surface of some of their 12 pdr. shells are regular dodecahedrons; of 
other-, it consists of an upper and lower pentagon, connected by ten 
equal trapezoids. The effect of both these devices is to cause the 
shell on bursting to divide into twelve pieces weighing about a pound 
each, and thus to secure the maximum effect. It is a decided suc- 
cess, — the former shape appearing to be more uniformly successful 
than the latter. Their system of filling spherical case with iron balls 
is a failure, the weight not being sufficient to render them effective. 

The great problem, — what is practically the best projectile for rilled 
artillery, — has been carefully investigated during this campaign, both 
by requiring full reports of our own firing, and by carefully collecting 
all varieties o\" projectiles fired by the rebels in return. Drawings of 
this collection, and of our own projectiles have been mad-', and the 
collection itself has been sent to the Military Museum at West Point. 

The following facts as to the rebel rifle projectiles are worthy of 
notice. Their variety is very great, about seventy different kinds 
having been collected. They may, however, be classified into nine 
systems, according to the devices for making them take the grooves. 

The first device is a cupped copper plate, secured to the shell by a 
screw, and held firm by radial grooves, generally seven in number, 
but sometimes six. One sample bears Brooke's name upon the cup* 
It seems to be confined to the heavier guns exclusively, — samples of 
the calibres 7 inches, 6.4 inches, and 4.2 inches, alone being collected. 
The projectiles appear to take the grooves well, but their plates are 
oftei. missing, — showing that it would be dangerous to use them over 
troops. 






FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 67 

The second device consists of making the projectiles of wrought 
iron, the bottom cupped like a lead bullet. This is rare, only three 
calibres, 7 inches, 6.4 inches, and 4.62 inches, being collected. It 
seems to be faulty' only from its expense. The samples were solid 
shot, apparently designed for firing at iron clad vessels. 

The third device is a curved copper plate, secured by a screw, and 
held firm by three dowels, made sometimes of three copper projec- 
tions from the plate, extending into holes in the iron base of the 
shell, and sometimes of three iron projections from the base of the 
shell, extending through holes in the plate. The explosion of the 
powder flattens the plate, and thus gives the rifled motion by increas- 
ing its calibre. This system is liable to the objection that the plate 
almost invariably separates from the shell, rendering the projectile 
unfit to be used over troops. It is, however, quite common, samples 
of the following calibres having been collected: 7 inches, 6.4 inches, 
4.62 inches, and 2.2 inches. It is even used to render serviceable, 
projectiles made upon other systems which are failures. 

The fourth system is that of Reed, which closely resembles Par- 
rott's. This is very common, no less than twenty different kinds of 
projectiles being collected. Seven have wrought iron cups, calibres 
6.4 inches, 4.2 inches, 3.b7 inches, and 3 inches. Eleven have cop- 
per rings, calibres 8 inches, 7 inches, 4>62 inches, 4.2 inches, 3.67 
inches, and 3 inches. The larger samples are rare, but for field guns 
this seems to be the standard system. The different devices for at. 
taching the ring are numerous, and are worthy of study, — one, espe- 
cially, in -which the shell apparently never fails to take the grooves* 
and never loses the ring, nor throws off fragments of iron from its 
base, — faults to which most of the other varieties seem liable. 

The fifth system takes the grooves by the expansion of a lead sabot,, 
It seems to be chiefly confined to large calibres. The lead sometimes 
remains upon the shell, but is very liable to strip. 

The sixth system is that of Mr. Whitworth, whose 12-pdr. guns 
the rebels use considerably. Some of the projectiles are English, and 
some of Rebel manufacture. They have even tried to make shells 
by boring out a cavity in the bolt to the diameter of their usual fuse* 
hole (0.9 inches). This, however, does not contain a sufficiently large 
bursting charge to be of service. 

The seventh system, — which is in common use, — is that of Mr. 
Hotchkiss. Many of these projectiles are evidently of our manufac- 
ture, bearing Mr. Hotchkiss' name and patent stamp. Others have 
no mark, and are without doubt of rebel manufacture. I have such 



68 



adjutant-general's report 



samples for calibres o.2 inches, and 3.3 inches, as well as 3 inches. 
The one of 3.3 inches has a large wire wound around the middle and 
covered by the lead, which I have never seen in those supplied by 
Mr. llotchkiss. 

The eighth system is in some doubt. The specimen is one of Mr, 
Schenkl'e old model 80-pdr. projectiles, which may possibly have been 
1 ived from our batteries and Bred back. It, however, has the char- 
acteristic copper fuse-plug of the rebels, and they evidently must have 
made a sabot for it, — of what material is not known. 

The ninth system is that of the English Armstrong and Blakely 
flanged projectiles, — samples of which were captured at Fort Fisher 
— but none of which have been used on these lines. 

Among the ammunition captured by the 18th Corps near Fort 
Harrison, were several samples of 100-pdr. and 30-pdr. projectiles, 
which I have issued for use to my batteries. 

There has been so much discussion of late as to the merits of the 
different kinds of guns and ammunition now in use in our service, 
that I have decided to report upon certain of our records — remarking 
that it is possible that future firing may modify the results obtained. 

First, as to Endurance. 

The only failures, as already stated, have been the bursting of a 
24-pdr. Sawyer (rifled) — and the blowing off of the muzzle of a 30- 
pdr. Parrott, caused by the explosion of a shell in the bore. The 
latter gun was not destroyed. The face was cut smooth with a cold 
chisel and its accuracy seems not impaired. The following table shows 
the extent of the tests — the record of a few guns showing the largest 
amount of firing being selected. 

100-pdr. Parrott, No. 11, fired 302 times, "I All old guns, fired an un- 
No. 13, fired 533 times, I known number of times, 



No. 15, fired 304 times, 
No. 20, fired 458 times. 



before coming into my 
possession. 



ZO-pdr. Parrott, No. 100, fired 1210 times, < 
No. 101, fired 1404 times, 
No. 121, fired 970 times, . . . 

No. 255, fired 1487 times, > A PI^ently uninjured. 

No. 25G, fired 1472 times, 
No. 259, fired 1392 times, 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 



69 



m „ •„ - , __ ,, „ , iC - . 1 All rendered dangerous, from 
4.5-in. Ore?., No. 41, fired 457 times, 4 , . . . • . ' B 

„ _ _ _ _ __^ . not being bouched when made. 

No. 89, fired 578 times, I _ . ° L , . A . .. 

-* T r, n „ , inn . ylnis is a great detect in this 

No. 96, fired 499 times, I , c h .. , . ,, . 
class ot guns, which should be 

J removed. 



No. 97, fired 519 times, 



8-inch Siege Mortar, No. 20, fired 1530 times, 
No. 24, fired 1614 times, 
No. 25, fired 1521 times, 
No. 26, fired 1536 times, 
No. 32, fired 2015 times, 
No. 36, fired 2016 times, 



Apparently uninjur- 
ed, — the vents even, 
not showing much 
wear. 



Second, as to Ammunition. 
The following tables explain themselves. They include February. 

















&£' 




Kind of Gun. 


Projectile. 


u 

<x> 
£> . 

§ g 


a 

© 
o 

s 


u 

© . 

c © 

2 a 


o5 

© 


3 
S 


© 5 


Remarks. 






Zc 


S3 


25.2 


HO 


H 


a-oo 




100-pdrr Parrott, 


Parrott, 


1355| 87 


12681223 


45 0.96 




it 


Rebel, (captured,) 


22 


22 21 


1 0.95 




30-pdr. Parrott, 


Parrott, 


85961738 


7218 6924 


294 0.95 




ii 


Schenkl, banded, 


178 56 


122 70 


52 0.57 




it 


Rebel, (captured,) 


43 1 


42! 40 


2 0.95 




4.5-inch Ordnance, 


Schenkl, 


2662 520 2142 1767 


375 0.82 




u 


Dyer, 


1364 142 1222 


981 


241 0.80 




u 


Amsterdam, (lead,) 


2391 30 


209 


65 


144 0.31 




20-pdr. Parrott, 


Parrott, 


572| 67 


505 


432 


73 0.85 




ii 


Schenkl, 


49 


49 


46 


3 0.93 




5.8-inch Sawyer, 


Sawyer, (flanged,) 


10 


10 


10 


1.00 


Gun burst. 


3.67-inch Sawyer, 


Sawyer, (lead,) 


125' 20 105 


81 


240.77 





70 



ADJUTANT-GENERA L ' 8 REPORT. 



The following table tests the fuzes in use. Tt includes the Febn>- 
ary firing. 







d 






>. 






CO 


Kind of Fuze. 


11 

a - 
v. 


E 

o 

c 
— 


Mi 

g s 

3 in 

5S W 




!> 

(S3 

11- 
119 


§ p 

"* s- 


U 

it 

- L 
— J. 


,3 

s 


■^•fssr^ . • 


764 

2822 662 


5157 
2160 


4327 
1712 


718 83 

329 0.79 




**»". j^Sfe ' 


2526 814 


1812 


1506 


79 


297 83 




o.Y.i 210 


149 


83 


22 


44 0.55 




Dyer. Time, 


290 94 


202 


143 





59 0.70 




Absterdam Percussion, - 


236! 48 


188 


99 


27 


62 0.53 




Ticc. Concussion, - 


41 


41 


30 


1 


10 7.03 




Rebel, } l*™"* * - ' 
' ) lime, - 


7 6 


1 





1 


0| 




M 6 


:vi 


9 


8 


15 0.28 




Sawyer Combination, - 


135 47 


88 


75 


2 


11 0.85 




Bormann, - 


706 218 


488 


359 


34 


95 0.78 




13 inch Mortar, wooden, 


218 54 


164 


128 


18 


is 0.78 




10 inch Mortar, wooden, - 


2349 854 


1495 


1206 


231 


58 0.80 




8 inch Mortar, wooden, - 


12527 1664 


10863 


9557 


815 


491 87 




Coehorn Mortar, paper, 


1326711706 


11561 


l 10495 


470 


59610.90 





These figures are too simple and convincing to require remark, 
other than to explain that every possible care has been taken to secure 
accuracy. They are taken from the daily reports of the batteries, 
where men are specially detailed under the close supervision of the 
battery commander to note the effect of every shot. If any uncer- 
tainty exists, the shot is entered "uncertain" and is not included in 
the final ratio. I believe that such records have never before been 
attempted in actual service, and therefore regard them as extremely 
valuable. 



CONCLUDING REMARKS. 

The casualties in the Regiment during the year have been ono 
officer and twenty-nine enlisted men killed, and four officers and forty 
four enlisted men wounded. Total seventy-eight. The deaths from 
other causes have been sixty-six in number. 

Lieut. Eben P. Hall was killed by a sharpshooter while regardless 
of personal safety he was skillfully directing the fire of his mortar 
battery. Lieut. J. II. Cummings and Lieut. G. L. Turner, refusing 
to leave their exhausting labors under fire until too late, died in con- 
sequence of their devotion to duty. The regiment may well be 
proud that these names appear upon its rolls. 

With a regiment so widely scattered as mine, unusually responsible 
duty devolve upon the subordinate officers. I have every reason to 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 71 

be satisfied with the manner in which they have borne the test, and 
with the maimer in which the enlisted men have seconded their efforts- 
To Lieut. Col. White I am indebted for cordial support and gallant 
service. Acting as Inspector General on my Staff, and for a time as 
Commanding Officer of the batteries in front of Petersburg, he has 
been the model of a high-toned gentleman. After serving until the 
end of the campaign, about six months beyond his original term, he 
left the army regretted by all who knew him. 

Lieut. Col. Trumbull has highly distinguished himself for ability, 
courage and devotion to duty. Entering upon the campaign with 
health much impaired, and placed at first in command of Fort Ander- 
son where he was under fire night and day, he seemed to throw off 
disease by determined will. Transferred to the command of the most 
important line of batteries in front of Petersburg, his only fault was 
in laboring beyond his strength. In October when recovering from 
ft severe attack thus engendered, he gave energetic attention to getting 
into position and organizing the artillery on the lines of City Point. 
Few officers have the energy and ability to accomplish what he has 
done. 

Major Cook, during most of the campaign has been in charge of 
the artillery on the lines of Bermuda Hundred, and has well performed 
his duties. 

Major Brookerand Major Ager, after gallant and distinguished ser- 
vices during the summer as battery commanders, have been promoted 
and have energetically entered upon their new duties. 

Where all the Company Commanders have so faithfully done their 
duty, it seems almost invidious to select names for special mention. 
Almost all have at different times had command of independent 
batteries, and none have failed to efficiently serve them. Some, 
however, have been more fortunate than others in having rare 
opportunities for performing conspicuous services; of this number are 
especially Captains Pierce, Osborne and Pride; also Captains Dow, 
Pratt, Giliett, Brigham, Burton, Lincoln, Twiss, Sargeant, Bannon 
and Dimock ; Lieutenants Jackson, Pratt, E. P. Mason, Patterson, 
O'Brien, Cashin, Odell, Bill, Woodruff, Beers and Silliman. 

The administration of a command so widely separated and so pe- 
culiar as mine, would have been impossible without a staff far more 
efficient than usual. I have already defined their different duties, and 
can only add, that to Capt. Hatfield, assisted by Lieuts. Faxon, Gil- 
lette, Jackson and Westervelt, to Capt. Mason, and to Capt. Learned, 



7:2 adjutant-general's report. 

great credit is due for skillful and energetic performance of perplex 
ing labors. 

Surgeon Skinner, Afist Surgeons Delavan and Mat-on, and Chap- 
lain Jarvis, all merit niv thank- for their faithful care of our sick. 

To the various corps commanders, upon whose fronts our batteries 
have been placed, and especially to Brevet Major-General H. J. 
Hunt, Chief of Artillery, Army of the Potomac, under whose orders 
most of the regiment is now serving, we have every reason to be 
grateful. The latter, and Brevet Major-General W. F. Barry, for- 
merly Chief of Artillery, Army of the Potomac, have been our con- 
stant friends since the peninsular campaign, and have laid us under 
deep obligation-. 

The following extract from a letter received from Major-General 
W. F. Smith, shortly after he left the Petersburg front, shows the 
estimation in which the regiment is held: 

"I saw much of the services of the 1st Conn. Artillery during the 
campaign of 1862, and was then delighted with the skill and gallantry 
of the officers and men. During the time I commanded the 18th 
corps before Petersburg, I called heavily upon you for siege guns and 
mortars, and never before during the war have I witnessed such artil- 
lery practice as I saw with your regiment. The practicability of 
holding my position there after the 21st of June, was due in a great 
measure to the skill displayed by your regiment. I trust every effort 
will be made to fill up a regiment which has not its equal in artillery 
firing, and which can not be dispensed with without great injury to 
the service." 

I am, General, 

Very respectfully your ob't serv't, 

HENRY L. ABBOT, 
Col. 1st Conn. Artillery, 
Brevet Brigadier- General Vols. 

Commayiding. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 73 



Consolidated lists of Casualties in 1st Conn. Artillery, 
from March 1st, 1864, to March 1st, 1865. 

Casualties reported June 10^/?, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company I. 
Privates, William II. Quintan, May 18th. 
William Rollcston, " 20th. 

Company K. 

Private, James McCormick, May 30th. 

WOUNDED. 

Company D. 
Private, John R. Miller, in leg, — amputated. 

Company F. 
Private, William Murphy, in shoulder. 

Casualties reported June Wth, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company G. 
C. C. Pollard, June 9th. 

Casualties reported July 1st, 1864. 

WOUNDED. 

Company D. 
Privates, S. C. Thompson, June 30th. 
James R. Joslin, " 30th. 
William Young, " 30th. 

Company I. 
Sergeant, Hubert G. Scott, June 30th. 
Privates, George F. Morgan, " 27th. 

Daniel Sullivan, " 27th. 

Lambert Steele, " 30th. 

Lucius F. Osborne, " 30th. 



74 adjutant-gi:ni:i:al's report. 

p nrteU July ,V, 1864 
Wol N DE I). 

[PANT I). 

Privates, II. P. Williams, Blipposed mortally, at mortar battery near 
Petersburg, Va.. July 1st 
William W. Kurn, at mortar battery near Petersburg, Va., 
July 2d. 

Casualties reported July <'lh, 1864. 
K I L L E D . 

Company I. 

Private, John Kelley, at battery near Pi reburg. 

WOUNDED. 

2d Lieut., George F. Bill, slightly, — arm, — by piece of shell. 

Casualties reported July llth, 1864. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 

Private, Julius S. Parsons, slightly, in knee, July 9th, mortar battery 

before Petersburg. 

Company E. 
Private, Charles E. Loomis, wounded in arm by careless discharge of 
a musket by one of the pickets ; arm amputated July 9th. 
(The pickets not of this regiment.) 

Company G. 
Private, Charles Brewster, severely wounded in thigh July 10th; 
mortar battery before Petersburg. 

Casualties reported July 12th, 186-1. 
KILLED. 

2d JaciU., Eben P. Hall, by a sharpshooter in mortar battery near 

Petersburg, July 12th. 

Casualties reported July \&th, 1864. 
KILLED. 

Company I). 

Sergeant, Edwin C. Kelley, killed by a sharpshooter in mortar battery 
before Petersburg, July 15th. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 75 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Sergeant, William II. Perkins, slightly, by musket bull, at battery 
near Petersburg, July loth. 

Company F. 
Private, Frank D. Pratt, thigh, by musket ball, at mortar battery 
near Petersburg. 

Casualties reported July 2\st, 1864. 

WOUNDED. 

Company G. 
Private, James McCaffrey, head, slightly, by fragment of shell, at 
battery near Petersburg, July 19th. 

Company I. 
Private, Charles A. Hawes, leg, slightly, by fragment of shell, at bat- 
tery near Petersburg, July 20th. 

Casualties reported July 24th, 1864. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 

Private, Frederick L. Chapman, severely, musket ball in groin, at 

battery near Petersburg, July 22d. 

Casualties reported July 26th, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company G. 
Private, John Hemar, killed by shell at mortar battery near Peters- 
burg, July 24th. 

WOUNDED. 
Company G. 
Privates, Samuel P. Phelan, by fragment of shell, in one arm and 
both legs, at mortar battery near Petersburg, July 24th. 
Michael Honk, shell, in head, at mortar battery near Peters- 
burg, July 24th. 
Antoine Herig, shell, in left leg, at mortar battery near 

Petersburg, July 24th. 
Andrew J. Harrington, shell, in head, at mortar battery 
near Petersburg, July 24th. 



76 



adjutant-general's report. 



Casualties reportedJuh/ 11th, 1864. 

WOE N I) ED. 

Company G. 
Corporal Henry II. Howard, Pounded by fragment of shell at Mortar 

Battery near Petersburg, July 2 1th. 
Private, George A. Pollard, wounded by fragment of shell at Mortar 

Battery near Petersburg, July 24th. 

Casualties reported July 30th, 1864. 
WOUNDED. 

Company C. 
Private, Frank Nolan, seriously, through side, by musket ball at Mor- 
tar Battery near Petersburg, July 30th. 

Casualties reported August 3d, 1864. 
WOUNDED. 

Company F. 
Private, Jacob Schlafer, by musket ball, in thigh, at battery near Pe- 
tersburg, Aug. 2d. 

Company M. 
Private, Jacob Dietrick, by musket ball, in thigh, at Battery near Pe- 
tersburg, July 30th. 

Casualties reported August 7th, 1864. 
WOUNDED. 
1st Lieut., William A. Lincoln, slightly, by musket-ball in the arm, at 
Battery near Petersburg, Aug. 5th. 

Company F. 
Private, Elizur H. Harrison, by musket-ball, in leg. at Battery near 
Petersburg, Aug. 6th. 

Company G. 
Corporal, Norman C. Mague, by fragment of shell, in arm, at Battery 
near Petersburg, Aug. 5th. 

Casualties reported August 14th, 1864. 
WOUNDED. 

Company B. 
Corpora^ Julius P. Kaisling, by ball in leg, at Battery on James river, 
Aug. 13 th, not dangerously. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 77 

Casualties reported August 17th, 1864. 
WOUNDED. 
Company D. 
Privates, E. A. Frietag, in neck, dangerously, by musket-ball, at Mor- 
tar Battery before Petersburg, Aug. 16th. 
C. W. Starkweather, arm, seriously, by musket-ball, at Mor- 
tar Battery before Petersburg, Aug. 16th. 

Casualties reported August 20th, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company A. 

Private, Henry R. Richardson, by fragment of shell, at Battery before 

Petersburg, Aug. 17th. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Private, Edward B. Anderson, dangerously, in head and ankle, by 
fragment of shell, at Battery before Petersburg, Aug. 
17th. 

Company D. 
Sergeant, Wells W. Reed, wounded in face and eyes by particles of 

dirt and splinters thrown by a bursting rebel shell, before 

Petersburg, Aug. 19th. 
Private, William C. Beebe, in leg, by fragment of shell, slightly, at 

Battery before Petersburg, Aug. 18th. 

Company G. 
Private, Stephen G. Howard, in foot, slightly, by fragment of shell, 
at Battery before Petersburg, Aug. 17th. 

Casualties reported August 26th, 1864. 
WOUNDED. 
2d Lieut., Benjamin Andrews, injured in left eye, sight destroyed by 
a friction primer, accident in Mortar Battery before Pe- 
tersburg, Aug. 24th. 

Company G. 
Private, Andrew Beinhoemer, in calf of leg, by sharp-shooter, at Mor- 
tar Battery before Petersburg, Aug. 24th. 



78 ADJUTANT- (J EN ERAL'S REPORT. 

Casualties reported August 30th, 1864. 

WO N 1) E I). 
Company D. 
Private, Ira Burgess, in thigh, dangerously, bj musket-ball, at Battery 
before Petersburg, Aug. 2'.»th. 

Company II. 

Private, Monroe Eddy, in foot, while running a gun into battery, Aug. 
29th, at Battery on James River. 

Casualties reported September 3d, 18G4. 
WOUNDED. 

Company B. 

Private, Elly J. Sherwood, in left thigh, by fragment of shell, at Bat- 
tery on James river, Aug. 31st. 

Casualties reported September Ylth, 1864. 
WOUNDED. 

Company M. 
Private, John Benedict, in head, not dangerously, by musket-ball, al 
Battery near Petersburg, Sept. 9th. 

Casualties reported September \\th, 1864. 
WOUNDED. 

Company D. 
Private, Lucius B. Truesdell, mortally, in left breast,, by musket-ball, 
at Battery near Petersburg, Sept. 12th. Died same day. 

Casualties reported September 2\st, 18G4. 

KILLED. 

Company L. 

Private, Truman Foote, by musket-ball, in head, at Battery before 

Petersburg, Sept 19th. 

Casualties reported September 271*, 1864. 

W O D N D E D . 

Company C 

Private, John Downie, in ankle, by fragment of shell, at Battery nt 

Dutch Gap, Sept. 20th. 



FIRST REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 79 

Company K. 
Private, Dwight F. Benton, in the breast, face, and arm, by strap from 
Cochorn mortar shell, at Battery before Petersburg, Sept. 
24th. 

Casualties reported September 30th, 1 8G4. 

WOUNDED. 

Company K. 

Corporal, Patrick W. Daley, severely, in light leg, by fragment of 

shell, at Battery before Petersburg, Sept. 29th. 

Casualties reported October 4th, 1864. 
WOUNDED. 

Company K. 
Private, William Haggerty, seriously, by a sharp-shooter, at Battery 
before Petersburg, Oct. 3d. 

Casualties reported October 16th, 1864. 
WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Corporal, Jeremiah Sullivan, mortally, in left breast, by minie ball, at 
Battery before Petersburg, Oct. 12th. Died Oct. loth. 

Casualties reported October 'loth, 18G4. 
KILLED. 

Company C. 

Private, Dennis Hoy, killed in action by fragment of shell, in head, at 
Battery at Dutch Gap, Oct. 24th. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Private, Edwin R.Johnson, mortally, in head, by musket-ball, at Bat- 
tery before Petersburg, Oct. 24th. 

Company K. 
Private. John Welch, slightly, in right shoulder, by musket-ball, at Bat- 
tery before Petersburg, Oct. 24th. 

Casualties reported November 6th, 18G4. 

KILLED. 

Company K. 
Private, Samuel Shaw, in action, by fragment of shell, near Peters- 
burg, Nov. 5th. 



80 adjutant-general's report. 

Company M. 
Corporal, John Brad-haw, in action, by fragment of shell in side, be- 
fore Petersburg, Nov. 4th. 

WOUNDED. 

Company K. 

Corporal, Joseph D. Tobey, dangerously, in head, by fragment of shell, 
near Petersburg, Nov. full. 

Casualties reported November 20>t?i, 18G4. 

"WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Corporal, Joseph E. Andrews, seriously, in left side, by musket-ball. 
Private, Peter Florange, dangerously, in left side of head, by musket- 
ball. 

Casualties reported November 2$th, 1864. 

WOUNDED. 

2d Lieut., Azro Drown, slightly, in head, by musket-ball, at Battery 
before Petersburg, Nov. 28th. 

Company E. 
Private, Adolph Buttner, mortally, by a sharp-shooter, at Battery be- 
fore Petersburg, Nov. 27th. 

Casualties reported December 18th, 18G4. 

WOUNDED. 

Company D. 
Private, Thomas M. Newton, seriously, in the leg, by a minie ball, at 
Battery Anderson, Va., Dec. lGth. 

Company E. 

Private, Richard D. Knight, seriously, in the left side, by fragment of 
a case-shot, at Battery before Petersburg, Dec. 17th. 

Casualties reported January \Gt/i, 18G5. 

K I L L B D . 

Company K. 
Private, William Maher, by musket-ball, at Battery before Peters- 
burg, Jan. loth. 



SECOND REGIMENT ARTILLERY 



81 



SECOND REGIMENT HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



Rank and Name. Residence. 



Colonels. 

James Hubbard, Salisbury, 

Elisba S. Kellogg, Derby, 

James Hubbard, Salisbury, 
Ron'd S. Mackenzie, U. S. Army, 

Lieut. Colonels. 

Jeffrey Skinner, West Winsted 

Nathaniel Smith, Woodbury, 

James Hubbard, .Salisbury, 

William B. Ells, jPly mouth, 

Majors. 

Edward W. Jones, INew Hartford 
Chest. D. Cleveland, Barkhamsted, 

Augustus H.Fenn, (Plymouth, 



Date of 
Commission. 



j Salisbury, 
'Plymouth, 
Goshen, 
West Winsted 



James Hubbard, 
William B. Ells 
James Q. Rice, 
Jeffrey Skinner, 
Chaplain. 
Winthrop H. Phelps,'Bi 

Surgeon. 
Henry Plumb, 

1st Asst. Surgeon. 
Robert G. Hazzard, 

2d Asst. Surgeon. 
Judson B. Andrews, 



Jan. 
Oct. 
June 
June 

Jan. 
Nov. 
May 
June 

Oct. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
May 



7,1865 
23,1863 



Remarks. 



Killed in action June 1, 1864. 



9,1864 Declined Commission. 
28,1864 Promoted Brig. Gen. Dec. 28, 1864. 

7,1865 

5,1863 Resigned, disability Mav 6, 1864. 
13,1864 Promoted Colonel^ Jan. 7, 1865. 
9,1864Com'n vacated by Lt. Col. Hubbard's 
[declining coms'n as Col. 
8,1864 
7,1865 
7,1^-65 

5.1863 Promoted Lt. Col. May 13, 1864. 

6.1864 Honorably discharged Dec. 24, 1834. 
17,1864 Killed in action Sept. 19, 1864. 
13,1864 Promoted Lt. Col. Jan. 7, 1865. 



New Milford, 
New Haven, 



New Haven, 



May 4,1863 
Aug. 16,1862 
July 21,1863 
July 21,1863 



Captains. 
William T. Spencer, 
Edward W. Marsh, 
James Dcane, 
Robert A. Potter, 
Gad N. Smith, 
Daniel E. Marsh, 
Hubbard E. Tuttle, 
James N. Coe, 
Theodore F. Vaill, 
Michael Kelley, 
Henry S. McKinney 
Orlow J. Smith, 
Henry Skinner, 
Luman Wadhams, 



Torrington, 
New Milford, 
Canaan, 
Plymouth, 
Cornwall, 
New Milt*ord,jJan, 
Torrington, Jan, 
WestWinsted Feb 



Aug. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Aug. 
Nov. 



Litchfield, 

Sharon, 

Woodbury, 

Winchester, 

Winchester, 

Litchfield, 



Mch. 
Mch. 
Mch. 
Mch. 
Mch. 
Aug. 
Nov. 
West Winsted' Aug 



Wm. H. Lewis, Jr., jWatertown, 
Jeffrey Skinner, 

Edward W. Jones, New Hartford 
Edward F. Gold, Cornwall, 
Eli Sperry, Woodbury, 

Benj. F. Hosford, WestWinsted 
Frederick M. Berry, Kent, 
Augustus H. Fenn, Plymouth, 
Walter Burnham, Washington, 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Mch. 
Mch. 
Mch. 



11,1863 
17,1864 
19,1864 
12,1864 
30,1864 

7,1865 

7,1865 

4,1865 

2,1865 

2,1865 

2,1865 
30,1865 
30,1865| 
11,1863 Killed in action June 1, 1864. 

20.1863 Honorably discharged Jan. 25, 1865 
1,1862 Promoted Major May 13, 1864. 
1,1862| " " Oct. 8, 1864. 
1,1862 Resigned & discharged Feb. 21, 1865. 
1,1862 Resigned March 30, 1864. 

15.1864 Killed inaction Oct. 19, 1864. 
26,1864 Died of wounds Sept. 28, 1864. 
31,1864Promoted Major Jan. 7, 1865. 



April 21, 1864) Honorably discharged Feb. 3, 1865. 



82 



ADJUTANT-r. ENERAI/S REPORT. 
Second Regiment Heavy Artillery — Continued. 



Rank and Name. 



Resi I 



( 'iijitains. 

Oreo II. Knight, 
Alex. B. Bhumway, 
Morris II. Sanford, 
Chest 1). Cleveland, 

1st Lieutenants. 
Warren A 1 ford, 
Edward ('. Huxley, 

Joseph E. Fenn, 

William L. Twiss, 

John E. Wheeler, 

James \Y . Dixon, 
Dwighl C. Kilbourn, 
Lewis Manger, 
Homer 8. Curtiss, 
James M. Snowden, 
John E. Sedgewick, 
David C. Munson, 
Salmon A. Granger, 
William A. Hosford, 
Bushrod 11. Camp, 
Robert A. Potter, 
Alex. B. Bhumway, 
Morris H. Sanford, 
Chest. D. Cleveland, 
Orcn H. Knight, 
Walter B urn ham, 
Augustus H. Fenn, 
Wilbur W. Birge, 
John M. Gregory, 
James N. Coe, 
Oliver P. Loomis, 
William McK. Rice, 
Gad N. Smith, 
Theodore F. Vaill, 
Philip E. Chapin, 
Edwin S. Hubbard. 
Franklin J. Candee, 
James P. McCabe, 
Orlow J. Smith, 
Henry Skinner, 
Daniel E. Marsh, 
Hubbard E. Tuttle, 
Michael Kelley, 
Orsamus R. Fyler, 
Henry S. McKinney, 
Chas" A. Revnolds, 
Orville B. iTOny, 
Heman Ellis, 
Henry R. Hoyt, 
Homer NY. Griswold, 

2d Lieutenants. 
Calvin B. Hatch, 
Austin P. Kirkham, 
Charles 1*. Travels, 
Frederick A. Lucas, 



Date of 

Commission. 



Remarks. 



Salisbury, 
Litchfield, 
Torrington, 
Barkhamsti d 

New Hartford 
< loshen, 

Plymouth, 
North Canaan 

New Hartford 

Hartford, 

Litchfield, 

Plymouth, 

Warren, 

New Haven, 
Litchfield, 
Torrington, 
Winchester, 
New Haven, 
Harwinton, 
'Plymouth, 
Litchfield, 
i Torrington, 
Barkhamsted, 
Salisbury, 
JNVashington, 
Plymouth, 
J Torrington, 
Cornwall, 
WestWinsted 
'Colebrook, 
Goshen, 
( 'on: wall, 
Litchfield, 
New Hartford 
Salisbury, 
Plymouth, 
Goshen, 
Winchester, 
Winchester, 
New Miiford, 
| Torrington, 
Sharon, 
Torrington, 
, Woodbury, 
Winchester, 
Barkhamsted, 
Hartford, . 
(New Miiford, 
, Goshen, 

New Preston, 
Derby, 
Sharon, 
Goshen, 



June 

Jllllc 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Mrh. 
Mrh. 

Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 
Mrh. 
Mch. 
Mch. 

Mch. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
July 
Aug. 
Nov. 
Mch. 
Dec. 
\ug. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 

Mch. 

Mrh. 

M.h. 
Mch. 
July 
Aug. 

Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov. 

Nov. 

Mch. 

Mch. 

Mrh. 

Mch. 

Mrh 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 



21,1804 Died July 6, 1864. 
11,1804 Honorably discharged Feb. 4,1865. 
22,1804 Discharged (as 1st Lt.) Jan. 13, '65. 
22,1864 Promoted Major Jan. 7, 1865. 



31,1864 

31,1864 

30,1864 

30,1864 

30,1864 

14,1865 

4,1865 

4,1865 

4,1865 

4,1865 

2,1865 

2,1865 

2,1865 

2,1865 

12,1863 

11,1863 

8,1863 

11,1863 

20,1863 

21,1863 

26,1862 

1,1862 

6,1864 

6,1804 

6,1864 

6,1864 

6,1864 

6,1864 

6,1864 

5,1864 

31,1864 

31,1864 

31,1864 

11,1864 

12,1864 

8,1864 

8,1864 

18,1864 

18,1864 

30,1864 

2,1 so;, 
2,1865 
2,1865 

2,1865 
2,1865 



Discharged, disability, Nov. 5, 1864. 
jPromoted Captain Aug. 12, 1864. 
Pro. Capt. July 11, 1864. (Jan 13 >65 

Pro. Cpt. Oct, 22, '64, notmust. as Cpt , dis. a« 1st Lt. 

'Promoted Captain Oct. 22, 1864. 

June 21, 1864. 

Apr. 21,1864. 

Mch. 31, 1864. 
Honorably discharged Sept. 7, 1864. 
" * " Jan. 10, 1865. 

Promoted Captain Feb. 4, 1865. 
Honorablv discharged Aug. 30, 1864. 
Died Nov. 8, 1864. 
Promoted Captain Nov. 30, 1864. 

Mch. 2, 1865. 
Honorably discharged Oct. 17, 1864. 
" Dec. 31, 1864. 

'Killed in action Sept. 19, lb04. 
Died of wounds Oct. 3, 1804. 
Promoted Captain Mch. 30, 1865. 
" 30, 1865. 

Jan. 7, 1865. 
7, 1865. 

Mch. 2, 1865. 
Discharged (as 2d Lt.) Mch. 9, 1865. 
Promoted Captain, Mch. 2, 1865. 
Ih-eW] & Com. revoked Mch. 81, '65. 

" " " " 27, '65. 

" " " " 27, '65. 

« " " 31/65. 

" 27, '65. 



6,1864 
5,1864 
8,1864 
8,1864 



SECOND REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 
Second Regiment Heavy Artillery — Continued. 



83 



Rank and Name. 



2d Lieutenants. 
Amzi P. Clarke, 
William E. Cooper, 
Chas. F. Anderson, 
George D. Stone, 
Admatha Bates, 
Joseph Pettit, 
David E. Soule, 
Seneca Edgett, 
Frederick M. Cook, 
Azarie N.Lamoreux, 
Orville B. Tiffany, 
Heman Ellis, 
Homer W. Griswold, 
Henry R. Hoyt, 
Chas. A. Reynolds, 
Calvin L. Davis, 
Hiram D. Gaylord, 
Edwin S. Hubbard, 
Franklin J. Candee, 
Daniel E. Marsh, 
Warren Alford, 
Dwight C. Kilbourn, 
Wm. H. Cogswell, 
Michael Kelley, 
Orsamus R. Fyler, 
Geo. B. Hempstead, 
James P. McCabe, 
Hubbard E. Tuttle, 
Orlow J. Smith, 
Edward C. Huxley, 
Horace Hubbard, 
George K. Hyde, 
John E. Wheeler, 
Henry S. McKinney, 
David R. Norman, 
James M. Snowden, 
Lewis Munger, 
Oscar Piatt, 
Henry Skinner, 
Homer S. Curtiss, 
William L. Twiss, 
Joseph E. Fenn, 
Salmon A. Granger, 
John E. Sedgewick, 
David C. Munson, 
Henry S. Deane, 
Wm. A. Hosford, 



Residence. 



Plymouth, 

Winchester, 

New Milford, 

Litchfield, 

Salisbury, 

Winchester, 

New Milford, 

Newtown, 

Winchester, 

Derby, 

Barkhamsted 

Hartford, 

Goshen, 

New Milford, 

Winchester, 

Litchfield, 

Norfolk, 

Salisbury, 

Plymouth, 

New Milford, 

New Hartford 

Litchfield, 

Cornwall, 

Sharon, 

Torrington, 

Litchfield, 

Goshen, 

Torrington, 

Winchester, 

Goshen, 

Plymouth, 

Torrington, 

New Hartford 

Woodbury, 

Bridgeport, 

New Haven, 

Plymouth, 

Sherman, 

Winchester, 

Warren, 

North Canaan 

Plymouth, 

Winchester, 

Litchfield, 

Torrington, 

Sharon, 

New Haven, 



Date of 

Commission. 



Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Mch. 

July 

Aug. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Mch. 

Mch. 

Mch. 

April 

April 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Feb. 



Remarks. 



1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1864 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1864 
1865 
1863 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1£64 
1864 
1864! 
1864| 
1864! 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
18641 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864| 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1865 
1865 



Never mustered as Lt., died as 
Promoted 1st Lieut. Mch. 31, 



Oct. 8, 

Mch. 31, 

Feb. 4, 

Died of wounds Oct. 6, 1864. 

Promoted 1st Lieut. Nov. 18, 

Pro. 1st Lt.Nov.18/64, dis. Mch 

Died wounds June 30/64. [as 

Promoted 1st Lieut. Mch. 31, 

Oct. 8, 

Julv 11, 

Mch. 31, 

Killed in action Sept. 19, 1864 

Honorably discharged Oct. 23, 

Promoted 1st Lieut. Nov. 30, 

" 30, 

Dismissed Sept 1, 1864. 

Promoted 1st Lieut. Feb. 4, 
a (i k ^ 

Discharged, Jan. 18, 1865. 

Promoted 1st Lieut. Aug. 12, 

Feb. 4, 

Nov. 30, 

u u « 30) 

Mch. 2, 

a (t it 9 

M j 

" " " 2, 

Disc, dis., Feb. 4/65, not must. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. March 2, 



Sergt. 
1864. 
1864. 
1864. 
1864. 
1865. 

1864. 
.8/65, 
2dLt. 

1864, 

1864. 

1864. 

1864. 

1864. 
1864.. 
1864. 

1865. 
1865. 

1864. 
1865. 
1864. 
1864. 
1865. 
1865. 
1865. 
2dLt. 
1865. 



84 adjutant-general's report. 

A report of the operations of this regiment during the year 
was received, Blgned by the Chaplain. As this could not be 
considered official, the report was returned for signature of 
the commanding officer of the regiment. 1 have delayed as 
long as possible for its return but it has not come to hand. 
The muster-rolls and monthly returns do not give any ac- 
count of the movements of the regiment. It will, therefore, 
be necessary to omit any history at this time — but in the 
next annual report to your Excellency the history can ba 
given for the two years. 



Head-Quarters, 2d Conn. Heavy Artillek 

Near Coal Harbor, Va., June 8th, 18G4. ) 

Brig. Gex. II. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 

General : 

I have the honor to transmit the following report of an engagement 
of this regiment with the enemy on the 1st of June, 1864. 

The regiment having been assigned on the 21st of May, near 
Spottsylvania, to the 2d Brigade, 1st Division, Gtli Army Corps, had 
been continually on the march from that time up to noon of the 1st 
of June, and for the last twelve hours had been rapidly moving with 
few and short rests. Upon arriving at this place, the command wa* 
immediately formed in order of battle, in a column of three battal- 
ions, the first commanded by Major Hubbard, the second by Major 
Rice, the third by Major Ells, and the whole by Colonel Kellogg, and 
was posted under shelter of a breastwork about 400 yards distant 
from the front line of the enemy, whose sharp-shooters kept up a 
constant fire upon us from the direct and oblique fronts. About 5 
o'clock P. M. a charge was ordered, and the regiment advanced 
across an open field, and into a heavy pine wood, in which the enemy 
were entrenched, under a«fire which thickened every moment, bring- 
ing men to the ground in every part of the line, and in all the bat- 
talions. The rank-, however, were instantly closed. The enemy 
vacated hisUrst line on our approach, and retired to his second. The 
first battalion came up to that with a momentum which would hava 



SECOND REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 85 

carried it over, had not its progress been arrested by a strong abattis 
of pine boughs. A terrific musketry fight ensued, lasting for half an 
hour, and resulting in our possession of the rifle-pits, and the capture 
of a number of prisoners, variously estimated at from 300 to 500. 

The second and third battalions being immediately in rear of the 
first, could not fire without killing our own men, and were ordered to 
lie down and remain there, a duty hardly le^s trying than that im- 
posed on the first battalion, as the annexed list of casualties will show. 
During the fight, the lines became more or less mixed, and all parts 
of the command were at times engaged. Our loss was most severe, 
and we were called upon to make up, in one hour, for our exemption 
from casualty during our past twenty-one months' service. 

Colonel Kellogg was in advance of the foremost line, his towering 
and conspicuous form, making him a target for the bolts of the enemy, 
and he fell in the very beginning of the fight, cheering on his men, 
and inspiring them by his conduct. 

The rebels in the entrenchments along the entire front of the regi- 
ment, were made prisoners and sent to the rear, and we held the line, 
and our forces do still hold it. 

Colonel Upton, our Brigade Commander, who was in the fight 
throughout, says : " They did all that men could do. The 2d Con- 
necticut need never be ashamed of their record." 

The annexed is a List of the casualties, including a few that hava 
iince occurred. 

List of Casualties in the 2d Conn. Artillery in the Battle of Coal 
Harbor, June ls£,1864. 

KILLED. 

Colonel, Elisha S. Kellogg. 

Company A. 
Captain, Luman Wadhams. 
1st Sergeant, Joseph P. Parke. 
Corporals, Albert A. Jones. 
Apollos C. Morse. 
Benjamin Meeker. 
George W. Potter. 
Privates, W. Barton. Privates, Almon J. Bradley. 

Oliver Hitchcock. John Iftland. 

Willard H. Parmelee. Patrick Ryan. 

Lyman J. Smith, Jr. Robert Watt. 



86 adjutant-general's report. 

Privates, Homer F. Tilford. Privates, Hobert Scull. 

George Everett. Stephen Fallen. 

William Braahing. 

Company B. 

Corporals, Walter C. Sparks, Myron EL St. Try. 

Privates, John IIan<iel. J'rivaies, Ezra B. Morris. 

Robert W. Bragg. Adam Oatraader. 

Franklin B. Stevens. Elias P. Scott. 

George W. Skiff. John B. Stoll. 

Amos Wooden. Charles Segur. 

Monroe Whitman. 

Company C. 
Sergeant, David J. Thorpe. 
Privates, George Pierce, Ezra B. Bouton, (June 3.) 

Company D. 
Privates, John Murphy, Henry Miller. 

Company E. 

Corporals, Frederick W. Daniels, Willard Hart, Alonzo J. Hull, 

Henry A. Rexford. 

Privates, Lewis Downs. Privates, Myron Ferris. 

Patrick Kane. Walter Martin. 

James Mooney. Ruel H. Perkins. 

Charles Stanley. George A. Tatro. 

John M. Teeter. Frederick D. Painter. 

Alfred Comins. William Kelley. 

Company F. 

Sergeant, Samuel E. Gibbs. 
Private, John Hall, (June 3d.) 

Company G. 
Sergeant, Joseph B. Payne. 

Company H. 

Privates, Henry C. Straight, Charles W. Jackson, Theodore^ F. 

Barnes. 

Company I. 

Privates, Almon D. Galpin, Friend F. Kane. 



SECOND REGIMENT ARTILLERY 



87 



Company K. 

Sergeant, George II. McBarney. Privates, Isaac Baldwin. 

Privates, Franklin Andrus. Edward Griffin. 

Henry B. Bristol. Andrew Jackson. 

Edmund Hickey. Robert Sothergill. 

David D. Lake. John Warner. 

Charles Reid. 



Private, John Martin. 



Major, William B. Ells. 



Company L. 



WOUNDED 



Company A. 



Licuts., Bushrod H. Camp. 

Hubbard E. Tuttle. 
Sergeant, George W. Mason. 
Corporals, Charles Adams, Jr. 

Curtis P. Wedge. 

Seth Whiting. 
Privates, John Bailey. 

John Benedict. 

Michael Bray. 

Charles Carter. 

Robert Crawford. 

James Ferris. 

Edward Hull. 

Charles P. Lamb. 

Truman Mai lory. 

Lyman F. Morehouse. 

James M. Prindle. 



Privates, Charles Belcher. 
James Bradley. 
Andrew J. Brooker. 
Robert W. Coe. 
Edson S. Dayton. 
Samuel Gunn. 
Myron E. Kilbourn. 
John Lawler. 
David McBath. 
Norman B. Perkins. 
Harvey Perkins. 
George Savage. 
Amos H. Stilson. 
George F. Waugh. 
Ransom E. Wood. 
David P. Wetmore. 



Company B. 



Sergeant, George L. Johnson. 
Privates, Augustus Adams. 

Sheldon Carley. 

Ezra Clark. 

Daniel Dunlavey. 

Solomon Hinkley. 

Roger Lyddy. 



Privates, Peter Malath. 

George W. McLane. 
Henry Tanner. 
Charles 0. Whaples. 
Richard Brown. 
Newton W. Cogswell. 
William Cornell. 



88 



adjutant-general's report. 



Privates, John Funk. 

Chester L. Johnson. 
George W. BJansfieUL 

Godfrey E. Miller. 



Privates, Wilson W. Scoville. 
Daniel E Taylor. 
John W. Coons. 



Company C. 

Corporal, Harrison Whitney. Privates, Christian Bjornsem. 

Privates, Cyrus Bartholomew. George Manning. 

Peter Bunts. 



I ANY D. 

Sergeant, David 1>. Wboster. Privates, 

Corporals, Edgar J. Castle. 

Albert Alfred. 
Privates, George L. Beach. 

William Elliot. 

Everett Griswold. 

William H. Harrison. 

Justin O. Stoughton. 

Charles Warner. 



Kelsey D. Clark. 
Chauncey Culver. 

Nathan II. Geer. 
Jonathan Hall. 
Lawrence A. Hunt. 
James Slater. 
Benjamin Williams. 
Walter Stone. 



Company E. 



Sergeant, James A. Green. 
Corporah,Da.x\d Miller. 

William A. Hosford. 
Privates, Christopher Arnold. 

Samuel W. Brewer. 

Sylvester Barrett. 

Stephen Green. 

Charles Howard. 

Patrick Lynch. 

Chauncey Loomis. 

Charles Mason. 

Nathan Perry. 

William Seymour. 

Henry P. Warner. 



Privates, Henry Wenzel. 
Charles Walsh. 
Edward Beach. 
Ernest Basney. 
Richard GingelL 
Augustus Hain. 
Peter Jordon. 
Jacob Leroy. 
Elizur Maltbie. 
John O'Connell. 
Edward Ricker. 
Philip D. Carroll. 
Marcus J. Whitehead. 
Erastus Woodworth. 



Company F. 
Privates, William Burke. Privates, James O. Hotchkiss. 

Timothy F. Kelley. William Malthouse. 

John W. Shaw. Alexander Walters. 

Thomas Smith. 



SECOND REGIMENT ARTILLERY 



89 



Company G. 
1st Sergeant, Henry S. Dean. Privates, Michael Curley. 



Privates, John Hawver. 

Wesley Bunnell. 
George Barton. 
Timothy Leonard. 



John Burns. 
John Dougherty. 
John Thompson. 



Company H. 



Sergeant, Lewis W. Mosher. 
Corporals, Henry A. Burton. 

Uriah F. Snediker. 
Privates, Charles H. Butler. 

States B. Flandreau. 

J. Harris. 

Henry M. Marshall. 



Privates, H. Payne. 

Alfred N. Whittlesey. 
George Chamberlain. 
Edward Harrington. 
S. Johnson. 
Hugh O'Donnell. 
Frank J. Warner. 



Company I. 

Privates, 



Sergeant, Thomas Shaw. 
CorporaIs,T$er\ji\m\n Wellman. 

Charles S. Terrell. 
Privates, A. Bennett. 

William Gregg. 

Levi Hotchkiss. 

Company K. 
CorporaIs,TZnoc\i Warhurst. Privates, 

James Tracy. 
Privates, John Ludford. 

George Brown. 

Owen Cromney. 

Hosmer W. Hodge. 

Patrick Kennedy. 

John Munson. 

Francis Sothergill. 

Chauncey Stephens. 

Evelyn L. Thorpe. 

Edgar J. Stewart. 

Company L. 
Captain, James Deane. Privates, 

Sergeant, Austin Kirkham. 
Corporah,J. S. Parmelee. 
W. Williams. 



C. Wheeler. 
S. Eastman, (June 3d.) 
Daniel B. Galpin. 
J. Hutchinson. 
Israel Lucas. 
Seymour Lobdeli. 

Thomas Coleraine. 
Stephen P. Harlow. 
Bernard Keegan. 
William B. Leach. 
Asahel N. Perkins. 
William H. Stevens. 
George E. Taylor. 
William W. Wheeler. 
Jacob Went worth. 
Charles Hoyt. 
George A. Wood. 



Edward Thomas. 1st. 
George Gillin. 
William Vrooman. 
Frederick Slade.J 



**0 A D J U T a N 1 - < ■ I N E R A L ' S REPORT. 

ANY .M. 

Sergeants,S\\n> A. Palmer. Privates, Myron W. Schultz. 

VlBi E. Canlicld, (June 3d.) Patrick Kennedy. 

Corporal, Amaziah Living-tone John Burns, (June 3d.) 

I'rivate, Samuel Osboro. 

M I SSI NG. 
Compajti A. 
Private, Benjamin II. Rathhnn. 

OOMPANT B. 

Corporal, William Dunn. Privates, Francis Burger. 

Privates, S. V. Benedict. Henry Dryer. 

James Caul. I). O. Page. 

I). Lacy. Henry Voelker. 

Reuben S. Speed. 

Com tan y D. 
Privates, Pomeroy Beecraft. James Strawn. 

Company E. 

Lieut., Calvin B. Hatch. Privates, Henry C. Kent. 

Corporal, James R. Baldwin. James Simpson. 

Privates, Sherman Apley. Henry G. Mitchell. 

Martin Blake. John Toole. 

Bouton D. Knapp. Bernard Carbury. 

John Scully. 

Company II. 
Privates, Patrick Lynch, William Smith. 

Company I. 
Private, James W, Green. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, CommissionedgOmcers, - - 2 

Enlisted Men, 72 

WOUNDED, Commissioned Orlie« m, - 4 

Enlisted Men, 181 

Missing, Commissioned Oil - - 1 

Enlisted Men, '25 

Xptal. 285 

I have the honor to be, 

With much respect. Your Ob'd't Servant, 
JAMES HUBBARD, 

Lieut.- Coloiiel Commajiding. 



SECOND REGIMENT ARTILLERY. 91 



2d C. V. A., ) 

>N, Va., Feb. 13, 1865-) 



Head-Quarters 2d C. V. A., 
Near Warren's Station, 
Sir: 
I have the lienor to state that this Regiment participated in an en- 
gagement with the enemy on the 6th of February, 1865, near Hatch- 
er's Run, about ten miles south of Petersburg, Va. 

The Regiment was moved forward to check the advance of the 
enemy on the left of the oth Army Corps, and succeeded in achieving 
the desired result, the enemy retiring before our fire. 

The following is a list of the casualties in this regiment : 

WOUNDED. 

Company C. 
Privates, Charles G. Wheeler, — in arm and breast. 
Orange S. Brown, — finger amputated. 

Company E. 
Privates, Charles E. Walsh, — side. 

Peter Larive, — finger amputated. 

Company L. 
Private, Jesse Cady, — both thighs. 

Company M. 
Corporal, Starr L. Booth, — leg. 

MISSING. 

Company I. 
Private, Timothy Walsh. 

Very respectfully, 

Your Ob'd't Servant, 

JAMES HUBBARD, 

Colonel '2d C. V. A., Commanding, 
Adjutant-General of Connecticut, 
Hartford, Conn. 



92 



ADJUTANT-i; KNKHAL'S REPORT 



FIFTB REGIMENT INFANTRY. 



Rank and Name. 

■ u 1$. 

Henry W. Daboll, 
Warren W. Packer, 

Win. 8. Cog 
Henry W. Di 

.1/. - 
Wiu. S. Cog 

Adjutant. 
William A. Daniels, 

Quarto trmasto. r. 
Edward K. Carley, 

Chaplain. 
Moses C. Welch, 

Surgeon. 
Evelyn S. Bissell, 
2d Asst. Surgeon. 
Andrew I. Gilson, 

Captains. 
Charles H. Sanford, 
Adolphus P. Reillv, 
Wm. C. Rockwell, 
James Stewart, Jr., 
Charles W.Wakeley, 
Harlan P. fcugg, " 
faaac rlillum, 
Albert L. Gavit, 
Michael Donovan, 
Justin II. Chapman, 
Charles Doyle, 
Alfred A. Chinery, 
Madison P.Whitney, 
Alfred L. Parker, * 
William P. Smith. 
Theodore H. Dibble, 

1st Lieutenants. 
Walter Burns, 
James But re r field, 
Napoleon J. Stone, 
Dennis Beach, 
Albert C. Burdtck, 
F.lisha R. Starr, 
James P. Henderson, 
George N. Raymond, 
Eugene H. ( kxrej, 
James Stewart, Jr., 
( lharlee Reynolds, 
Edwin F Carter, 
Will'm S. Purington, 
Rdgar A. Stratton, 



Rcsi.l 



Date of 
Comn 



New London, .Jan. 

Mystic River, dan. 

Hartford, jjan, 
Xew Londoi 



Hartford, 
Danbnry, 

Danbury, 

Hartford, 

Xew Haven, 

E.Bridgeport, 

Milford, 

Cincinnati, O. 

Xew Haven, 

Danbury, 

Fairfield, 

Winchester, 

Hartford, 

Stonington, 

Xew Haven, 

Hartford, 

Colchester, 



Xorwalk, 



Aug. 
Dec. 

April 

Oct. 

Mch. 



L^.isc,:, 

28,186.3 

21,186.3 

4,1862 

1,1863 

16,1862 

12,1864 



Jan. 26,1863 



Jan. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Xov. 
Not. 

Xov. 
Xov. 
Xov. 
Xov. 
June 
Jan. 
Jan . 
Jan. 
Jan. 



Hartford. 
Mystic River 
W'ilmV'nDe! Sepl 
Danbury, Sept 



Milford, 
West port, 
Killinglv, 
Milford,* 
Stonington, 
X T ew London, 
Hartford, 
Danbury, 
iGroton, 
Danburv, 
Xorwalk, 
Brooklyn, 
Willimantic, 
Danbury, 



1863 
1863 
1863 
1S64 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1861 
1 863 
1 863 
1 863 
1863 
Is,;;; 
1863 



Remarks. 



[pired. 
Mustered out Oct. 20, 1864, term ex- 



Promoted Colonel Jan. 28, 1863. 

Promoted Lt. Colonel Jan. 28. 1865. 
[pired. 
Mustered out Oct. 21, 18C4, term ex- 



Resigned, disability, July 5, 1864. 



Transf. to Inv. Corps Sept. 3, 1863. 

Discharged, disability, Nov. 4, 1864. 

" * " 4, 1864. 

Discharged January 10, 1865. 
Must, out Oct 30, 1864 ; term exp'd. 
" Nov. 1, 1864; 
Oct. 20, 1864; 



Sept. 

Xov. 


12,1863 
17,1864 


Xov. 

X..v. 
Xov. 


17,1864 
17,1864 
17,1864 


Xov. 


17,1864 


Xov. 


17,1864 


Jan. 

Sept. 
Sepr. 
Sept. 
Sept. 


28,1863 
12,186.3 
12,1863 
12,1863 
12,1863 


Sept. 
Xov. 


12,1863 

16,1863 



Killed in action March 16, 1865. 
Mustered out. 

Resigned and discharged Oct. 4, '64. 
Promoted Captain Nov. 17, 1864. 
Resigned, disability, Aug. 6, 1864. 
Honorably discharged June 18,1864. 
Must, out Oct. 31, 186-1 ; term exp'd. 
Nov. 1,1864; 









FIFTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 



98 



Fifth Regiment Infantry — Continued. 



Rank ami Name, i Residence. 



l«f Lieutenate. 
Wesley H. Botsford, 

Herbert 1). Redtield, 
Terry P. Wilson, 
2d Lieutenants. 
Isaac. N. Wcldon, 
Alvin H. Hurt, 
Michael Donovan, 
Isaac Killum, 
George Titos, 
Albert L. Gavit, 
Perry P. Wilson, 
Charles W.Wakeley, 
AddtsonM. Whitlock 
Harlan P. Rugg, 



New Haven, 

Saybrook, 

Woodstock, 

Canterbury, 

W. Cornwall 

New Haven, 

Hartford, 

Waterbory, 

Stonington, 

Woodstock, 

Fairfield, 

Bethel, 

Winchester, 



Date of 
Commission. 



Remarks. 



Not. 17,1864 Declined Commission Dec. 27, 1864. 
Nov. 17,1864 Commission revoked .Jan. 27, 1865. 
Nov. 17,1864 Hon.disch. (as 2d Lt,) Dec. 22, 1864. 

Sept. 12,1863 

|jan. 31,1863 Must, out Nov. 1, 1864 ; term exp'd. 

(Sept. 12,1863 Promoted Captain Nov. 17, 1864. 

Sept. 12,1863 " " " 17, 1864. 

{Sept. 12,1863 Resigned August 4, 1864. 

! Sept. 12,1863 Promoted Captain Nov. 17, 1864. 

Sept. 12,1863 " 1st Lieut. " 17,1864. 

Sept. 12,1863 " Captain " 17,1864. 

; Xov. 16,1863 Must, out Nov. 1, 1864; term exp'd. 

Nov. 16.1 863 Promoted Captain Nov. 17, 1864. 



On the 30th of April, 1864, this Regiment was encamped at 
Bridgeport, Ala. Moved thence as a part of the force under 
Major-General W. T. Sherman in the advance from Chattanooga, 
and participated in the several engagements with the enemy up 
to the occupation of the city of Atlanta, Ga., which place the 
Regiment entered on the 25th day of September, having sus- 
tained a loss as shown in the lists of casualties reported hy the 
Commanding Officers after each engagement. 

(Lists of casualties appended.) 

(See report of Lieut. Colonel Daboll, Jan. 16th, 1865, here- 
with.) 

On the 28th February, 1865, the Regiment was north of the 
Wateree River, S. C, and formed part of the force under Gen. 
Sherman marching through the States of South and North Car- 
olina, the campaign being yet in progress at this date. 



M adjutant-general's report. 



HeAD-QuARTEB8, 5TH CONN. VOLS., ) 

I, 1864.) 



Ci.assville, Ga., May 22d, 
General : 

I haw the bonor to enclose herewith a list of killed, wounded and 
missing in the 5th Conn. Vols, at the battle near Resaca, Ga., on the 
15th instant. 

I am, Genera!. 

Very ;, iUy, 

Your ob't servant, 

WARREN W. PACKER, 

'. CbntiTg 5th Conn. Vols. 

Brig. Gen. II. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General, State of Connecticut. 

List of killed, wounded and missing in 5th Conn. Vols, at battle of 
Resaca, Georgia, May loth, 1864. 

KILLED. 
Company C. 

Privates, Augustus TV. Hoyt. 
Paul Mohr. 

Company D. 

Paiveites, Adolphus H. Barr. 
John TVileox. 

Company F. 
Private, Matthias Medemach. 

CO.MPANT 1. 

Privates, John Bates. 

James C Richards. 

Company K. 
Private, Charles Rice. 

TV O U N DEI). 

Company B. 
Privates, Thaddeus Shook, — side. 

John G. Blake, — leg and side. 



FIFTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 95 

Company C. 
Privates, Robert Fitzmorris, — finger, slightly. 
John B. Sinclair, — leg, severely. 
John Yax, — arm, slightly. 
William McKeagney, — leg, severely. 

Company D. 
Privates, James P. Pellett, — arm, slightly. 

Franklin Everett, — chest, slightly. 

Company E. 
2nd Lieutenant, George W. Titus, — head, severely. 
Corporal, Samuel H. Hoyt, — side, severely. 
Private, George W. Buckbee, — arm, severely. 

Company F. 

Sergeant, John H. Brewster, — head, slightly. 
Corporals, Albert L. Rix, — shoulder, slightly. 

John Dickson, — foot, severely. 
Privates, Nathan S. Dean, — lungs, severely. 

Samuel Briggs, — ankle, slightly. 

John McCartney, — arm, slightly. 

Company G. 

Privates, John Anderson, — hip, slightly. 
John Jones, — hand, slightly. 

Company H. 
Privates, Benjamin F. Jones, — side, severely, 
Moses B. Wilcox, — thigh y severely. 
William H. Bowles, — arm, severely. 
Patrick Kelly, — arm, slightly. 

Company I. 
Privates, James Tuttle, — face, slightly. 

Patrick Galligan, — arm, slightly. 
Thomas Graham, — head, slightly. 
Richard Jones, — head, slightly. 

Company K. 
Sergeants, George B. Latimer, — legs, severely. 

Peter Carney, — legs, severely. 
Corporal, George R. Hopkins, — leg, severely. 



96 adjutant-general's report. 

Privates, John Adams, — leg, slightly. 

Alonzo Buckley, — groin, severely. 
Thomas Wi Bayard, — groin, -lightly. 
Delano N. Carpenter, — foot, slightly. 
Stephen Corcoran, — arm, severely. 
sander Halwick, — leg, slightly. 
Robert Hedging, — arm, slightly. 
George I). Norton, — shoulder, severely. 
Stiles W. Nye, — arm, severely. 
John Rogers, — leg, severely. 
Bernard Reynolds, — bowels, severely. 
"William D. Spicer, — leg, slightly. 
Christopher Willincamp, — leg, severely. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted men, 8 

Wounded, Commissioned officers, - 1 

Enlisted men, - - - 42 

Total, 51 



Heap-Quarters, oth Conn. Vols., ) 
Near Dallas, Ga., May 28th, 1864. ) 

General : 

I have the honor to enclose herewith a list of the killed, wounded 
and missing, in the oth Connecticut Volunteers, in the action near 
Dallas, Ga., on the 25th instant. 

I am, General, 

With respect, 

Your obedient servant, 

WARREN W. PACKER, 

Col. ComcTg 5th Regt. Conn. Vols. 

Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 



FIFTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 97 

List of killed, wounded and missing in bth Conn. Vols., in action 
near Dallas, Ga., May 25th, 1864. 

KTLLED. 

Company B. 
Private, James Sherren, — killed by sharp-shooter on the 27th. 

Company D. 
Corporal, Alvin T. Barnes. 

WOUNDED. 

Company B. 
Sergeant, Barney Gilroy, — leg, slightly. 
Corporal, Julius Crissey, — arm, slightly. 
Private, John Kline, — hand, slightly. 

Company C. 
Sergeant, Dennis Beach, — hand, slightly. 
Privates, Frank Hughes, — leg, slightly. 

John Thomson, — arm, slightly. 

Albert Poggles, — hand, slightly. 

Company D. 
Privates, Charles C. Higby, — head, severely. 
James Walker, — chest, severely. 

Company E. 

Privates, Richard Spring, — side, slightly. 

Calvin A. Hubbard, — hand, slightly. 

Company F. 
Privates, Joel Jones, — foot, severely. 

Charles Boardman, — leg, slightly. 
Edward Dunn, — leg, severely. 

Company G. 

Sergeant, George Briggs, — hand, slightly. 
Privates, Robert Bunnell, — hand, slightly. 
H. Partello, — face, severely. 

Company II. 
Private, John Greene, — shoulder, slightly. 

7 



98 adjutant-general's beport. 

Company I. 

Sergeant, S. P. Jewett, — shoulder, slightly. 
Privates, William Erytrouhle, — head, severely. 

Edward Hughes, — hand, severely. 

Robert Nichols, — arm, slightly. 

James Tuttle, — head, slightly. 

Adam Coons, — leg, slightly. 

Henry Heaton, — hand, slightly. 

Abram Frankle, — arm, severely. 

MISSING. 

Company B. 
Sergeant, Eli Manross. 
Private, O. Nettleton. 

Company F. 

Private, John W. Scarborough. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted men, 2 

Wounded, Enlisted men, 26 

Missing, Enlisted men, 3 

Total, - - 31 



List of men in 5th Conn. Volunteers, wounded on Picket Line on the 
3rd and 4th of June, 1864. 

WOUNDED. 

Company B. 

Privates, William Roberts, severely. 
Thomas Moore, " 

Company E. 

Corporal, John Robinson, severely. 

Private, Thomas White, slightly, (since returned to duty.) 

Company K. 
Sergeant, David A. Starr, slightly, (since returned to duty.) 



FIFTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 90 

RECAPITULATION. 

Wounded, Enlisted Men, 5 

* * *•*♦♦• 

I have the honor to be General, 

Very respectfully, 
Your obedient servant, 
WARREN W. PACKER, 

Col. ComoVg 5th Conn. Vols. 
Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General, State of Connecticut, 
Hartford, Conn. 

List of killed and wounded in 5th Conn. Volunteers, on the 16*A, llt?\ 
and l§th June, 1864. 

WOUNDED. 

Company B. 
Private, John Kline, leg, slightly, June 16th. 

Company D. 

Private, Henry L. Schaeffer, leg, slightly, June 19th. 

Company F. 

Private, David Phippeny, leg, severely, June 19th. 

Company I. 

Private, Thomas Kelly, hand, slightly, June 17th. 

Total, 4. 

WARREN W. PACKER, 

Col. ComoVg 5th Conn, Vols*. 

Station : Camp in Field, Geo., 
June 25th, 1864. 



100 adjutant-general's report. 

Head-Quarters 5th Connecticut Volunteers. 
In Field, Geo., June 23rd, 1864. 
General : 

I have the honor to herewith enclose a list of the killed and wound- 
ed, in this Regiment, on the 22nd of June, in an engagement with the 

enemy near Marietta, Georgia. 

* * * • * * » 

I am, General, 

With respect, 

Your obd't servant, 
WARREN W. PACKER, 

Col. ComoVg 5th Conn. Vols. 
Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 

List of killed and wounded in 5th Reg't Conn. Volunteers, on 
Jund 22d, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company B. 
Private, Alfred Goodrich. 

Company E. 
Sergeant, Charles Squires. 

Company I. 
Private, Henry Heaton. 

WOUNDED. 

Company B. 
Privates, John Richards, in hand, slightly. 

George Reinhardt, in arm, severely. 

Company E. 
Corporal, Alvin Hubbard, foot, severely. 
Privates, Walter W. Avery, wounded and taken prisoner. 
Richard Spring, side, slightly. 
• John Skinner, arm, -" 



FIFTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 101 

Company F. 

Private, John Elliott, head, severely. 

p 

Company H. 
2d Lieut. Perry P. Wilson, both legs, one amputated. 

Company I. 

1st Lieut. James Stewart,. right thigh, severely. 
Corporal, George Martin, shoulder, " 

Privates, Roswell Root, head, " 

James Dunnigan, thighs, " and taken prisoner. 

Company K. 
Private, John Youngs, arm, severely. 

Privates John Skinner, Co. E, and James Dunnigan, Co. F, 
reported taken prisoners, were wounded and taken prisoners 
on the skirmish line. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted Men, - - - 3 

Wounded, Commissioned Officers, - - 2 

Enlisted Men, - - - 11 

Total, - - - - 16 

List of killed, wounded and missing, 5th Conn. Volunteers, at the bat- 
tle of Peachtree Creek, Ga., July 20th, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company C. 
Private, E. Duffy. 

Company D. 

Privates, Patrick Smith, John McCormick, 

August Meyer. 

* Company F. 

Corporal, W. A. Taylor. 

Company G. 
Sergeant, George Wilcox. 
Corporal, M. Halo. 
Ptivates, John Clay, S. Patrick, 

John Carr, 1st, George Bedford. 



102 adjutant-general's report. 

♦ 

Company I. 
Privates, Charles Cunningham, William Meighan. 

Company K. 
Sergeant, Morton W. Brown. Corporal, Philip Deverieks. 

WOUNDED. 

Lieut, and Adft., William A. Daniel?, Jr. left shoulder, slightly. 
Ass't. Surgeon, Andrew I, Gilson, leg, slightly. 

Company B. 
Sergeant, L. M. Snow, finger, slightly. 
Privates, R. Rennin, arm, slightly, G. M. Clark, arm, slightly. 

E. S. Mott, died on 21st, George May, over eye, slightly. 

E. B. Coolidge, side, slightly. 

Company C. 
2nd Lieut. Isaac N. Weldon, leg, slightly. 

Privates, Robert Bill, groin, severely. 
Jacob Miller, leg, slightly. 

Company D. 
Privates, Thomas Evans. 

H. L. Mitchel, shoulder, slightly. 
Charles A. Ferran, arm, slightly. 
John McKinney. 
John N. Williams. 
Peter Welch, leg, slightly. 
George Barnes, side, slightly. 
W. Hesselbacher. 
Hugo Oberempt. 

Company E. 
Sergeant, Myron Bishop, leg, amputated. 
Corporal, George Gilbert, severely. 
Privates, John Davis, leg, amputated. 

Gilbert Sanders, side, severely. 

P. Thornley, hand, severely. 

W. Vanworst, side, severely. 

Company F. 
Privates, George Campbell, knee, severely. 
C. Sailer, knee, slightly. 



FIFTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 103 

Company G. 
2d Lieut., Albert H. Gavitt, ankle, slightly. 
Sergeant, George Briggs, foot, slightly. 
Corporals, Chas. Corey, back, severely. 

P. Howard, side, slightly. 
Privates, Eben Scribner, head, severely. 

R. Condon, head, slightly. 

B. Hodge, arm, slightly. 

William Murray, foot, slightly. 

James Neval, arm, slightly. 

Company H. 
Sergeants, N. Stone, thigh, slightly. 

G. N. Cheney, foot, slightly. 
Private, John Young 1st, died 21st. 

Company I. 

Privates, James Tuttle, face, slightly. 

James McCabe, head, slightly. 
H. Schaffer, slightly. 

Company K. 
Privates, Philip Fisher, — died 21st. 

William Cordner, leg, slightly. 

MISSING. 

Company C. 
Private, Robert Tilo, on skirmish line. 

RECAPITULATION. 

- 15 
4 

- 40 
1 

Total, - - 60 

Most respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

WARREN W. PACKER, 

Col. ComoVg bth Conn, Vols. 
Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General Connecticut. 



Killed, 


Enlisted Men, - 


Wounded, 


Commissioned Officers. 




Enlisted Men, - 


Missing, 


Enlisted Men, 



104 adjutant-general's report. 

Head-Quarters 5th Conn. 
Near Atlanta, Ga., July 31st 



General : 

The following list of casualties occurred in the 5th Connecticut 
Volunteers, on the 30th inst, while supporting the advance picket 
line. 

KILLED. 

Company C 
Private, Charles E. Cole. 

COMrANY F. 
Private, Felix Clarey. 

Company H. 
Private, Henry King. 

WOUNDED. 

Company B. 

Private, James Morse, hip, severe. 

Company D. 
Private, Fred Rixecker, fingers, slight. 

Company F. 
Privates, William Sloan, contusion, thigh. 
Peter McDonald, head. 
James Robinson, head. 

Company H. 

Private, James Shannon, arm, severe. 

Company I. 
Private, Pat. Gallighan, neck. 

I have the honor to be, General, 

Your obedient servant, 

WM. S. COGSWELL, 
Major 5th Reg. Conn. Vols. 
Brig Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut, 

Hartford, Conn. 



FIFTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 105 

Head-Quarters, 5th Reg. Conn. Vet. Vols., | 
Near Savannah, Ga., Jan. 16th, 1865. ) 
General : 

I have the honor to submit the following report for the 5th Regi- 
ment Connecticut Veteran Volunteers, from Sept. 2d, 1864, to the 
present time. 

When I received the command from Colonel Packer, who had 
succeeded General Knipe in command of our Brigade, the Reg- 
iment was encamped at Atlanta, Ga., enjoying a much needed rest 
after the exhausting campaign just ended, and preparing for one we 
expected would soon open. 

With the exception of the muster-out of a number of the officers, 
(report of which has been forwarded,) nothing aside from the usual 
camp routine occurred, until the 21st of October, when the Regiment 
formed a portion of the escort to a foraging train, of eight hundred and 
sixty wagons, sent out in the direction of Flat Shoals to collect sup- 
plies from the enemy's country. 

The expedition was one of considerable importance, as in conse- 
quence of the interruption of our communications, by Hood's army, 
our stock was rapidly dying for want of forage ; we were entirely 
successful and returned to camp on the 24th. 

On the 29th of the same month, the Regiment, with the rest of the 
Brigade, was sent to Decatur, to cover the return of a similar expe- 
dition, reaching camp again the same night. 

Nov. 5th, the entire Corps moved out on the McDonough road some 
three miles, and bivouacked for the night. The following day we re- 
turned to our old position, where we remained until the 15th, when 
we entered upon the campaign which terminated with our occupation 
of the city of Savannah. 

Before entering upon a report of the part taken by this regiment 
in the recent campaign, I would call your attention to the disadvantage 
we labored under from the want of officers. 

There were present with the Regiment but six line officers, and 
one of these was acting as adjutant. Notwithstanding this, and 
though the nature of our marches (depending almost entirely upon the 
country for supplies, and regiments and companies being broken up, 
to guard and assist trains, stretched over long intervals,) was neces- 
sarily such as would try the morale and discipline of a command. 

I am happy to state that during the entire campaign, the Regiment 
behaved in a manner, not only gratifying to myself, but that has elic- 
ited the commendation of my superiors. 



106 adjutant-general's report. 

The duties we were culled upon to perform were extremely 
arduous 

After the fir.-t day's march our Division was in the rear with the 
wagons until we arrived at Mill* dgeville, November 22d. 

On the morning of tin- 2.')d, tin- Regiment with the rest of the 
Division deployed along the Gordon and Milledgeville Railroad, and 
effectually destroyed it for a distance of ten miles. We reached Te- 
nille Station on the Georgia Central Railroad, Nov. 2Gth, and were 
at work tearing up the Bame until Nov. 30th, when we again joined 
the main column. We met with little or no opposition from the 
enemy, until Dec. Dth, when we arrived within a few miles of Mon- 
ieuth Station, on the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. 

Here the enemy had constructed an earthwork, and with artillery 
in position, had command of a portion of the road which they had 
rendered impassable for cavalry by felled timber. 

The Regiment being in advance of the infantry column, was ordered 
to deploy, and develop their force. We advanced to within about six 
hundred yards of the fort, when they opened with artillery. Here we 
halted until the three Brigades of the 1st Division were got in posi- 
tion, when an assault was ordered. We fired our volley of musketry, 
"gave a yell," and made a simultaneous rush for the work, a portion 
of this Regiment being the first to enter, capturing seven prisoners 
and a quantity of ammunition. The enemy succeeded in taking off 
their artillery. 

The Regiment suffered no casualties during the attack. 

December 10th, we marched with the column and halted within a 
few hundred yards of the enemy's works, taking our position on the 
extreme left of the 1st Division, near the Savannah River. 

Here we remained until the evening of Dec. loth, when the Regi- 
ment received orders to accompany a train of one hundred and sixty- 
five wagons, as guard, to King's Bridge, a point on the Ogeechee 
River, some sixteen miles distant. Here we remained until Dec. 22d, 
when we returned with the train to the city of Savannah, which wa* 
occupied by our forces on the morning of the 21st inst. 

The Regiment is now comfortably situated in good board huts on 
the banks of the Savannah River, some two miles from the city. 
Very respectfully, 

Your Ob'd't Servant, 

HENRY W. DABOLL,- 
Lieut. Col. Com'd'g 5th Regt Conn. Vet. Vols. 
H. J. Morse, 

utant- General, State of Connecticut. 



SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY 



107 



SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 



Rank and Name. 



Colonels. 
Alfred P. Rockwell, 
Redfield Duryee, 

Lieut. Colonels. 
Daniel Klein, 
Lorenzo Meeker, 

Majors. 
Hiram L. Grant, 
Daniel Klein, 

Adjutants. 
Benj'n B. Penfield, 
Henry F. Stanley, 
Walter Fitch, 

Quartermasters. 
Wm. H. H.Wooster, 
Joseph Colton, 
Chaplains. 
Charles C. Tiffany, 
Curtis T. Woodruff, 

Surgeons. 
Myron W.Robinson, 
Frederick L. Dibble, 

1st Asst. Surgeons. 

Henry A. Hoyt, 

Edw'd Bulkeley, Jr. 

2d Asst. Surgeon. 

Myron W.Robinson, 

Captains. 
Eugene Atwater, 
Frederick Striby, Jr., 
John P. Connell, 
Joseph Miller, 
Charles J. Buckbee, 
John B. Gilbert, 
Alfred B. Beers, 
Lewis C. Allen, 
John N. Tracy, 
Henry Biebel, 
Freder'k B.Osborne, 
Charles H. Nichols, 
Samuel C. Peck, 
Jay P. Wilcox, 
John Stottlar, 
John P. King, 
Horatio D. Eaton,. 
George Soder, 
Bennett S. Lewis, 
Dwight A. Woodruff, 
Hiram L. Grant, 



Residence. 



Norwich, 
Waterbury, 

New Haven, 
Stamford, 

Putnam, 
New Haven, 

Bridgeport, 
New Haven, 
Bridgeport, 

Waterbury, 
Waterbury, 

New Haven, 
Naugatuck, 

Hebron, 
New Haven, 

New Haven, 
New Haven, 

Hebron, 

Terryville, 

New'Haven, 

New Britain, 

New Haven, 

New Haven, 

Bridgeport, 

Bridgeport, 

New Haven, 

New Britain, 

Bridgeport, 

New Haven, 

Stamford, 

Milford, 

Waterbury, 

Stamford, 

Hartford, 

Hartford, 

Bridgeport, 

Bridgeport, 

New Britain, 

Putnam, 



Date of 

Commission. 



June 11 

Nov. 27 

Oct. 1 

Nov. 27 

Feb. 21 

Nov. 27 

Dec. 2 

Sept. 23 

Aug. 28 

Oct. 24 

May 11 

Sept. 22 

Dec. 4 



Dec. 16 
Sept. 2 

Mch. 23 
Sept. 2 

April 11 



Remarks. 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mch. 
Mch. 
Mch. 
Mch. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
July 
Aug. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
May 
May 
May 
Sept. 



1864 Must, out Feb. 9, 1865; term exp'd. 
1 863 Honorably discharged May 29, 1864. 



1864 
1863 



Honorably discharged Sept. 13, 1864. 



1865 

1863,Promoted Lt. Colonel Oct. 1, 1864. 

1 864 [term expired. 

1864 Must, out (as IstLt.) Nov. 23, 1864; 
1863 Honorably discharged July 23, 1864. 



1864 
1863 

1864 
1862 

1864 
1861 

1865 
1861 

1863 

1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 



Honorably discharged Sept. 13, 1864. 

Honorably discharged April 18, 1864. 

Must, out Sept. 12, 1864 ; term exp'd. 

Must, out Sept. 12, 1864 ; term exp'd. 
Promoted Surgeon Dec. 16, 1864. 



Died April 20, 1864. 
Must, out Sept. 12, 1864 ; term exp'd. 
Mch. 12, 1865; 

" Oct. 25, 1864; " 

" Jan. 4, 1865. 
Resigned June 29, 1864. 
Killed in action May 10, 1864. 
Must, out Dec. 2, 1864 ; term exp'd. 
Dishon'bly discharged June 7, 1864. 
Killed in action May 16, 1864. 
Honorably discharged Sept. 11, 1864. 
Must, out Dec 2, 1864; term exp'd. 
Died of wounds Sept. 21, 1864. 
Promoted Major Feb. 21, 1865. 



108 adjutant-general's report. 

Sixth Regiment Infantry — Continued. 



Rank and Name. 



K ~: ience. 



1st IJtutniants. 

Daniel J. West, Bridgeport, 
Andrew Marshall, Hartford, 
Sidney S. Hicks, New Britain, 
James A. Wilson, New Haven, 
James Whitelejr, New Britain, 
Patrick Dillon," Killinriy, 

John H. Butts, Stamford, 

Walter Anderton, Nangatnck, 
George Louis, Bridgeport, 

George Boder, Bridgeport, 

Bennett S. Lewis, Bridgeport, 
Clovis E. Hammond, Killingly, 
William F. Bradley, Madison, 
Dwight A. Woodruff, New Britain, 
Joseph Miller, New Haven, 

Charles J. Buckhee, New Haven, 
Henry F. Stanley, New Haven, 
Hiram L. Grant, Putnam, 
Gottlieb Hildebrand, Tariffville, 
Norman Provost, i Stamford, 
George Bellows, Putnam, 
Eugene Atwater, Terryville, 
John B. Gilbert, Bridgeport, 

2d Lieutenants. 
John King, |New Haven, 

George A. Gesner, JNew Haven, 
DeForest W. Ferris, Stamford, 
Rudolph Kost, \ Bridgeport, 

Marsh. I.Tourtellotte Putnam, 
Henry F. Stanley, New Haven, 
Sidnev S. Hicks, New Britain, 
Gottlieb Hildebrand. Tarirtville, 
Hiram L. Grant, Putnam, 
Wm. H. H. Wooster,; Waterbury 



John W T aters, 



Bridgeport, 



Date of 
Commission, 



Norman Provost, Stamford, 
Andrew Grogan, i Bridgeport, 
Freder'k Striliy. Jr., New Haven, 
Woodbury II. Stake, New Haven, 
George Bellows, Putnam, 
John P. Connell, New Britain, 
John B Gilbert, (Bridgeport, 
James A. Wilson, New Haven, 
Benjamin Holmes, Norwalk, 
James Whiteley, jNew Britain, 



Sept. 

Feb. 

May 

Feb. 

Men. 

Itch. 

Mch. 

Mch. 

Aug. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb 

Mch. 

May 

May 

May 

May 

Sep't. 

Dec. 

Feb. 

April 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

Mch. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Mch. 

Feb. 

Mch. 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

( kit 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Feb. 



1861 



Remarks. 



1864 
1 M4 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 

1861 Resigned April 14, 1864. 

lomotcd Captain May 25, 1864. 
"" 25, 1864. 
Died of wounds June 27, 1864. 
1864 Died May 20, 1864. 
1^64 Promoted Captain May 25, 1864. 
1864 " " Mch. 3, 1865. 

1864 " " " 3, 1865. 

1864 " Adjt. Sept. 23, 1864. 

1864 " Captain " 23, 1864. 

1864 Resigned and discharged Sept.5, 1864. 
1864 Honorably discharged Sept. 29, 1864. 
1864 Declined commission Oct. 31, 1864. 

1864 Promoted Captain Feb. 2, 1865. 

1865 " " Mch. 3, 1865. 



1863 
1864 
1865 
1861 
1862 
1863, 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1 864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1S64 
1864 
1865 



Mustered out March 12, 1865. 
Died November 20, 1864. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. May 25, 1864. 

1st " " 25, 1864. 
" 1st " " 25, 1864. 

1st " " 25, 1864. 

" Qr Master Oct. 24, 1864. 
Honorably discharged Mch. 8, 1865. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. May 31, 1864. 
Honorably discharged Nov. 22, 1864. 
Promoted Captain Feb. 2, 1865. 
Died Aug. 17, 1864. [term expired. 
Prom 1st Lt.; diseh. Nov. 11, 1864; 
Promoted Captain Feb. 2, 1865. 

1st Lieut. " 2, 1865. 

1st " " 2, 1865. 
Commission revoked Dec. 6, 1864. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. Mch. 3, 1865. 






SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 109 

On the 27th of April, 1864, the regiment embarked at 
Hilton Head, S. C, on board Steamer Northern Light, for 
Fort Monroe, Va., where it arrived on the first of May, and 
immediately proceeded to Gloucester Point, disembarked, 
and was assigned to the 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 10th Army 
Corps. On the 4th of May, with the 10th Army Corps, em- 
barked on transports and proceeded up the James river, 
landed at Bermuda Hundred, Va., on the morning of the 
6th, advanced at once to the interior; marched about eight 
miles without meeting the enemy. On the morning on 
the 9th of May the regiment left camp as part of an expe- 
dition, marched toward the Richmond and Petersburg rail- 
road, and tore up the railroad track, at intervals, from Chester 
Station to the Junction, sixteen miles south of Richmond. 
Engaged the enemy May 10th, fourteen miles south of Rich- 
mond. May 13th the regiment was assigned for temporary 
duty with Colonel Alford's Brigade, General Turner's Divi- 
sion, 10th Army Corps, and ordered to the skirmish line, 
where it remained till the 16th, continually under fire from 
the enemy's skirmish and picket line. On the morning of 
the 16th five companies of the regiment were on picket. 
During a dense fog the enemy made an attack on our lines. 
The remainder of the regiment was ordered up as support to 
the picket line, and in this manner engaged the enemy for 
about three hours, when the regiment was obliged to fall 
back, having expended ammunition, and the enemy attacking 
in force. The regiment rallied behind earthworks, and again 
advanced, but did not encounter the enemy. On the 20th of 
May the regiment — now attached to Colonel Howell's Brig- 
ade, 1st Division, 10th Army Corps — was engaged in the 
charge and capture of the enemy's line of rifle-pits. May 
27th, moved to the rear, taking position behind intrench- 
ments, and so remained until the 9th of June, when the 
regiment crossed the Appomattox river and marched toward 
Petersburg, about twelve miles, skirmished with the enemy, 
and returned to camp at Bermuda Hundred the same day. 
July 1st to August 13th, the regiment was stationed at Ber- 
muda Hundred, doing picket and fatigue duty. August 



110 adjutant-general's report. 

18th, 10 P. M., the regiment struck camp and marched to 
the James river, crossed at Deep Bottom the next morning, 
and moved in support of the 100th New York in the charge 
and capture of a rebel battery. August lGth, charged and 
carried the enemy's works, capturing a large number of pris- 
oners, but was obliged to fall back to former position. On 
the 20th of August, re-crossed the James river and went into 
camp at Bermuda Hundred. August 24th, crossed Appo- 
mattox river, marched ten miles and relieved a portion of the 
18th Army Corps, in the trenches before Petersburg, in which 
position the regiment remained until September 1st ; from 
this date until September 25th, it was engaged in building 
and garrisoning Fort Haskell. Then being relieved by a 
portion of the 2d Army Corps, it marched to Deep Bottom 
and crossed the James river. On the 29th, advanced and 
captured the enemy's fortifications on the New Market Road, 
then moved to a line of works on the right of Chapin's Bluff. 
Oct. 7th, the enemy made an attack on the extreme right 
of the position occupied by the Corps ; the regiment advanced 
to the right and engaged in the action, repulsing and driving 
them in confusion ; from this date to the 2Gth the regiment 
was engaged in picket and fatigue duty, and in strengthening 
the lines of works. On the 27th, advanced with the Corps 
to the extreme right of the enemy's works, took part as skir- 
mishers in an engagement with the enemy, remained in this 
position during the day and then returned to camp. Novem- 
ber 3d, the regiment struck camp, marched to Deep Bottom, 
embarked on board transports, and proceeded to New York 
Harbor, re-embarked on the 14 th, returned to Deep Bottom 
and encamped in former position in line of works before 
Richmond. During the month of December the regiment 
was engaged in building more comfortable quarters and doing 
picket duty. January 3d, 1865, the regiment left camp be- 
fore Richmond, and embarked on board transports ; on the 
13th, disembarked on the beach about six miles from Fort 
Fisher. In the actions at Fort Fisher, and vicinity of Wil- 
mington, it was engaged, and on the 28th of February was 
encamped Tiear Wilmington. 



SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. Ill 

The above is taken from memoranda as given on the 
muster-rolls and monthly returns received at this office, 
special reports of operations not having been received. 



Head-Quarters 6tii Reg't Conn. Vols., ^ 
Bermuda Hundred, Va., May 11, 1864. ) 
Brig. Gen. Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut, 
General : 

I have the honor to report the following list of casualties in this 
Regiment during the engagement of May 10th, 1864 : 

KILLED. 

Company B. 
Captain, Jay P. Wilcox. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Privates, John Reynolds, left leg. 
Michael Lynch, hand. 

Company B. 
Privates, William Huff, back of head. 
Solomon Buckland, neck. 

Company C. 
2c? Lieut, Gottlieb Hildebrand, shoulder, severely. 
Sergeant, J^hn Rattelsdorfer, contusion of left shoulder. 
Privates, Philip Jost, left fore finger. 
Frederick Forster, chin. 

Company D. 
Sergeant, John Botts, eyes. 
Privates, Edward Searles, left hand. 

Charles H. Weed, arm. 

Joseph Topfer, contusion by spent ball. 

Joit Les, leg. • 



112 adjutant-general's report. 

Company "E. 
Privates, William Pritchard, right knee. 
Daniel Higgins, leg. 

Company F. 

Private, Theodore Phillips, side, severely. 

Company G. 
Private, Joel F. Hunt, right fore arm. 

Company H. 
Corporal, George Hetzel, left leg. 
Private, Christopher Bernard, both hands. 

Company K. 
Corporal, Robert T. Sperry, right thumb. 
Private, David Williams, left thumb. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Commissioned Officers, - - - 1 

Wounded, " " 1 

Enlisted men, - - - 20 

Total, - - - 22 

I have the honor to be, General, 

m Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

LORENZO MEEKER. 
Lt. Col ComcTg Qih Reg"t Con. Vols. 



SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 113 



Head-Quarters 6tii Regt. Conn. Vols.,) 
Bermuda Hundred, Va., May 17th, 1864. ) 

Brig. Gen. Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General, State of Connecticut. 

General : — 

I have the honor to report the following List of Casualties in this 
Regiment during the past four days. 

KILLED. 

Company B. 
Private, Henry Bemus, May 16th. 

Company C. 
Private, Henry Ringo, May 16th. 

Company E. 
Captain, Horatio D. Eaton, May 16th. 
Private, John "Woods, May 15th. 

Company G. 

Private, James Malone. 

Company H. 
Private, James Doyle, May 15 th. 

Company K. 
Private, Joseph Barker, May 16th. 

WOUNDED. 

Lieut. Col., Lorenzo Meeker, — contusion of right knee, May 16th. 

Company A. 
1st. Lieut. Bennett S. Lewis, — right side, slightly, May 16th. 
Privates, William Brown, — left shoulder, May 14th. 

Edward Chapman, — finger, May 14th. 

Eben Day, — arm, May 14th. 

Dana W. Paine, — body, May 14th. 

Company B. 
Corporal, George Hanford, — hand, May loth, 

8 



114 adjutant-general's report. 

Private, Dexter W. Ingalls, — side, May loth. 
Charles Bachtold,— leg, May 16th. 
John Foster, — hand, May lGth. 
Philip Gallagher, — not known where, May 16th. 
John Glenn, — hand, May lGth. 
William Wood,— hand, May lGth. 
Samuel Porter, — thigh, May 16th. 

Company C. 
CorjyoraJ, Edward Deming, — face, May 10th. 
Private, Charles W. Paynip, — abdomen, May 16th. 

Company D. 

Captain, Charles H. Nichols, — right leg, slight, May 16th. 

Corporal, Henry Duffy, — hand. May loth. 

Privates, Patrick Fox, — not known where, May 14th. 

Frank Bryson, — breasts, May 15th. 

Edgar L. Pratt, — leg, May loth. 

Frank O'Brien, — hand, May 15th. 

Thomas Schieber, — hand, May loth. 

Samuel La Brocq, — left breast, May 16th. 

William S. Pratt,— loin, May lGth. 

William L. Bouton, — arm, May 16th. 

James Bruce, — arm, May 16th. 

I>aac Dingy, — arm, May 16th. 

Smith Scofield, — side and arm, May 16th. 

Company E. 

Privates, Michael Brady, — right knee, May 14th. 

John H. Arepke, — right cheek, May 16th. 

Company F. 
Privates, George W. Benham, — leg, May 16th. 
John W. Plumb,— hand, May 16th. 
Charles C. Lee, — hand, May 16th. 

Company G. 

Captain, John N. Tracy, — right arm, May 16th. 

1st Lieut., Charles J. Buckbee, — contusion in left ankle, May 16th, 

Privates, Patrick McGee,-^-back, May 16th« 

Christian L. Mack, — left arm, May 16th. 



SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 115 

Company H. 

Corporal, Louis Roselius, — abdomen, May 16th. 
Privates, Fritz Schuster, — back, May 16thr 

John Lang, — penis, May 16th. 

William Miller, — foot, May 14th. 

Frederick Wieber, — hand, May 14th. 

Jacob Muchar, — back, May 14th. 

Albert Altis, — leg, May 14th. 

Julius Altman, — back, May 14th. 

Company I. 
2nd Lieut., Norman Provost, — right leg, May 16th. 
Privates, — Alanson Monroe, — breast, severely, May loth. 

James Brislan, — side, slightly, May 16th. 

George Hoag, — left arm, May 16th. 

William Salar, — leg, May 16th. 

John Robinson, — head, May 16th. 

Company K. 
Privates, William Stanton, — hand, May 16th. 
John Verner, — hand, May 16th. 

MISSING. 

Company A. 

Private, William Clark, — supposed taken prisoner, May 16th. 

Company B. 
Privates, Richard L. Ames, — supposed taken prisoner, May 16th. 
Charles Fowler,— " " " " 

Company C. 
Privates, George Vogel, — supposed taken prisoner, May 16th. 
Jacob Ernst, " " " " 





Company 


E. 






Sergeant, James A. Blake,- 


—supposed 


taken prisoner, 


May 16th 


Privates, William Rigney, 


a 




tt 


M ii 


James B. Stevens 


a 




a 


ii ii 


Martin Sanchis, 


a 




u 


U ii 


John Sears, 


u 




a 


ii ii 


Miles Williams, 


a 




u 


a a 






116 adjutant-general's report. 

Company II. 
Captain, Henry Biebel, — supposed taken prisoner, May 16th. 



ivates, August Schutt, 


M 


il 




Bernhud KirchofiJ M ■ 


.. 


M 




Peter Miller, 


U 


U 




Company K. 








irafef, John Ferry, — supposed taken prisoner, 


May 


16th. 




James Young, " " 


M 


M 




Asaph C. Whitcomb, ■ 


M 


tt 




William Gladstone, " 


M 


M 




James Hine, " 


u 


u 




Frederick Smith, " 


a 


■ 




RECAPITULATION. 








Killed, Commissioned Officers, 




_ 


1 


Enlisted Men, - 


- 


. 


6 


Wounded, Commissioned Officers, 




- 


6 


Enlisted Men, - 


- 


- 


48 


Missing, Commissioned Officers, 




- 


1 


Enlisted Men, - 


- 


- 


20 


Total, - 






82 



I am, General, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

DANIEL KLEIN. 
Major Comd'g Qth Regt. Conn. Vch. 



SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 117 

Head-Quarters, 6th Reg't Conn. Vols.,) 
Bermuda Hundred, Va., May 21st, 1864. J" 

Brig. Gen. Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 

General : 

I have the honor to report the following List of Casualties in this 
regiment during the engagement of May 20th, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company C. 
Private, Christopher Belchner. 

Company H. 

Private, Charles Gangloff. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Corporal, James Holt, in head, severely. 
Privates, Benjamin F. Heath, left hand. 

Albert Aldrich, left finger. 

Walcott Wetheral, contusion of left elbow. 

Andrew Gallup, arm. 

Company B. 
Privates, Congdon Shepard, right foot. 
Edward Loughrey, left heel. 

Company C. 
Privates, Rudolph Spoehel, left arm. 
Detlef Beick, right hand. 

Company D. 
Sergeant, George W. Finch, left hand and hip. 
Corporal, Joel M. Anderson, left thumb. 
Privates, John Kennedy, right leg. 

Henry Schofield, contusion of knee. 

Company E. 

ist Lieut., William T. Bradley, abdomen, mortally. 
Private, Patrick Dalton, abdomen. 



118 adjutant-general's report. 

Company G. 
Privates, Patrick Kellett, hip and arm. 

William Cobleigh, contusion of left thigh. 
Lewi- H. Cook, finger. 
John Murphy, left fore-arm. 
Sterling Bunnell, head. 

Company II. 

Privates, Alexander Naaman, abdomen. 
Conrad Bauer, face. 
Frederick Speer, cheek. 
Adam Uhl, not known where. 
Benjamin F. Boss, contusion of left hip. 

Company L 
Privates, Emil Pean, left shoulder. 

George H. Fox, testicles and right groin. 
Michael Maloy, nose and thigh. 
Thomas Quinn, lett leg. 

Company K. 
Privates, Charles Green, left thigh. 

Henry Staff, both legs and testicles. 
"William "Whit tarn, contusion of left shoulder. 
Henry H. Thomas, abdomen. 
Edgar A. Willard, left hand. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted men, - - - -2 

Wounded, Commissioned officers, - 1 

Enlisted men, - - - 33 

Total, - - - 36 

I have the honor to be, General, 
Very respectfully, 

Your ob't servant, 

DANIEL KLEIN. 
Major Coirtdg bth Reg't Conn. Vols. 






SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 119 



Head-Quarters, 6th Reg't Conn. Vols.,) 
Bermuda Hundred, Va., June 18th, 1864. ) 

Brig. Gen. Horace J. Morse. 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 

Hartford, Conn. 

General : 

I have the honor to submit the following List of Casualties in the 
6th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, during an engagement near 
Bermuda Hundred Intrenchments. Va., June 17th, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company A. 

Private, Halsey Bartlett. 

Company C. 

Privates, Michael Stark. 

George Henninger. 
Augustus Hesse. 

Company F. 
Private, Jesse Butler. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Privates, Seth Barden, right cheek. 

William Barrett, right hand. 

Company B. 
Privates, Sylvester Davis, left arm, severely. 
James Edwards, right arm. 

Company C 

Privates, Jacob LaufFer, left shoulder. 

Emil Knoblauch, contusion of left breast. 
Joseph Necker, left leg. 

Company D. 
1st Lieut, Clovis E. Hammond, spine and left hip, severely. 
Corporal, William H. Reynolds, right shoulder. 
Private, John Goodman, right foot. 

Company E. 
Private, George Williams, right lung. 



120 



adjutant-general's report. 



Company F. 

Private, George S. Barnes, left leg. 

Company II. 
Privates, Eugene Gay, right finger. 
Julius Altman, right hand. 

Company I. 
Privates, John Ross, right arm. 

Henry Smalley, right little finger. 

MISSING IN ACTION 

Company D. 
Captain, Charles H. Nichols, 
Sergeant, Horace Hobbie. 
Privates, Seth S. Bouton. 

Patrick Fox. 

Joseph E. Raymond. 

Robert McDonald. 

James L. Lockwood. 

Thomas Picker. 

Company E. 
Privates, James Walling. 
Richard Welch. 
George Campfield. 

Company H. 
Private, Charles Howey. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted Men, 
Wounded, Commissioned Officers, - 

Enlisted Men, 
Missing, Commissioned Officers, - 

Enlisted Men, 



Privates, James A. Pott>. 
George E. Searls. 
Edward M. Seeley. 
Oscar E. Snyder. 
Benjamin Timpson. 
Barney Tonar. 



5 
1 

15 
1 

17 

39 



Total, - 
I am General, 

Very Respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

LORENZO MEEKER, 

Lt. Col Comd'g Qth Regt. Conn. Vols. 






SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 121 

Head Quarters 6th Regt. Conn. Vols., | 
Bermuda Hundred, Va., Aug. 21st, 1864. J 

Brig. Gen'l Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut, 

Hartford, Conn. 

General : 

I have the honor to report the following List of Casualties in 
the 6th Regiment Conn. Volunteers during the engagements at Deep 
Run, Va., from Aug. 14th, 1864, to Aug. 18th, 1864, inclusive: 

KILLED. 

Company C. 
Private, Gustave Fritehe. 

Company D. 
Private, Edward M. Harting. 

Company E. 
Private, Patrick Doling. 

Company I. 
Private, Charles Perley. 

Company K. 

Privates, Nicholas Weiss. 
John Smith. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Sergeant, Israel B. Winslow, lung, severely. 
Corporal, Henry J. Bemis, leg. 
Privates, Charles Bishop, leg. 

Myron De Forest, leg. 

John Bruce, leg. 

Calvin Perry, severely. 

John Callahan, hand. 

Company B. 

Captain, Bennett S. Lewis, side, severely. 
2c? Lieut., John Waters, arm, slightly. 



122 adjutant-general's report 

Corpora^ William Ehraain, left Bboulder. 
Privates, William II. Harmon, band. 

( reorge I >ennis, back. 

.John A. Young, left shoulder. 
Aimer W. .Mitchell, long, sererelr. 

Company C. 

Captain, John Stottlar, leg* 

ltt Lieut., Joseph Miller, hack, slightly. 

Privates, Peter Searing, foot. 

Anthony Ruff, arm. 

Michael Brehm, not known where. 

Company D. - 
2d Lieut., George Bellows, leg. 
Privates, Alfred Lawrenee, groin. 

Oliver W. Vernal, mouth. 

Henry Schofield, leg. 

Clarence E. Searles, arm. 

Company E. 
Captain, Dwigbt A. Woodruff', arm. 
Sergeant, Luzerne Baldwin, arm. 
Corporal, Aaron C. Sanford, foot. 
Privates, John Flannagan, arm. 

Horace Moulthrop, leg. 

William Pritchard, arm. 

Charles E. Stebbins, arm. 

Company F. 
Corporal, Mark Bassett, side. 
Privates, Rudolph Hall, leg. 

Charles W. Hill, leg. 

James P. McCue, leg. 

Company G. 
SergeantsJohn P. Connell, knee. 

James McKinney, side. 
CorporaIs,¥A\\\i\vd Alpress, arm. 

Edward A. Stone, head. 
Privates, Lucius D. Leonard, abdomen and arm. 

Terrence Mulloy, neck. 

John TVyer, hip. 

Patrick K. Fitzgerald, side. 



SIXTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 123 



Company H. 
Sergeant, Caspar Zimmerman, arm. 
Corporals, Louis Vogel, foot. 

Charles Graham, hip. 
Privates, Julius Lehman, leg. 

George Pfister, leg. 

Charles Newman, hip and arm. 

John Hamburger, shoulder. 

Gottlob Stoll, hand. 

Rudolph Kombst, severely. 

Philip Miller, leg. 

Company I. 
Sergeant, Samuel C. Thomas, side, severely. 
Corporal, Alfred B. Beers, arm. 
Privates, Charles H. Burritt, sides and arm. 

Jacob Pawlowich, arm. 

Dennis McCarty, hand. 

William Salar, side. 

Company K. 
Corporal, William II. Brown, leg. 
Privates, John Smith, both legs. 

William M. Clark, head. 

Charles Green, hand. 

James Morris, mouth. 

MISSING IN ACTION. 

Company A. 
Privates, Ambrose B. Seymour. 
Frank E. Morse. 

Company D. 
Corporals, John S. Clark. Privates, John D. Ward. 

Charles E. Provost. Richard H. Bogue. 

Private, Roper Hounslow. 

Company G. 
Corporal, John Brand. 
Private, Charles Bishop. 



124 adjutant-general's report. 

Company I. 
Corporal, George W. Buckings. 

Private, Jacob Beck. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted Men, ... 6 

WOUNDED, Commissioned Officers, - - 6 

Enlisted Men, ... 58 

Missing, Enlisted Men, - - - - 11 

Total. - - 81 

I am. General, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

ALFRED P. ROCKWELL, 

Col. Comd'g Gtk Regt. Conn. Vols. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY 



125 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 



Name and Rank, i Residence. 



Colonels. 
Seager S. At well, 
Joseph R. Hawley, 

Lieut Colonels. 
Daniel C. Rodman, 
Seager S. Atwell, 

Majors. 
Jerome Tourtelotte, 
Oliver S. Sanford, 

Adjutants. 
Albert M. Holden, 
Ezra L. Moore. 



Meriden, 
Hartford, 

I Hartford, 
! Meriden, 

I 

Putnam, 
Meriden, 

Hartford, 

Salisbury 



Date of 

Commission 



Remarks. 



Quartermasters. 
William H. Augur, New Haven, 
William T. Seward, [Guilford, 

Chaplain. 
Jacob Eaton, | West Meriden 



Surgeon. 
George C. Jarvis, 

1st Asst. Surgeon. 
Elmore C. Hine, 

2d Asst. Surgeons. 
Samuel B. Shepard, 
Elmore C. Hine, 

Captains. 
Val.B. Chamberlain, 
John Thompson, 
Henry B. Gill, 
William S. Marble, 
Ira E. Smith, 
Willard Austin, 
Wm. H. Pierpont, 
William E. Phillips 
Elmer C. Jordan, 
Lucas SutlirT, 
Theodore Bacon, 
John B. Dennis, 
Jerome Tourtelotte, 
James A. Burns, 
Charles C. Mills, 
Seager S. Atwell, 
Jeremiah Townsend 
Edward S. Perry, 
John B. Young," 
Benjamin A. Hill, 
1st Lieutenants. 
Andrew H. Kinney, 
Dennia O'Bihn, 
John G. Cox, 



Portland, 



Mch. 4,1865 

■ May 19,1862 Prom. Brig. General Sept. 17, 1864. 

; May 9,1863JHonorablv discharged Oct. 22, 1864. 

■ Oct. 29,1864iPromoted Colonel March 4, 1865. 

|Mch. 21,1865; 

■ May 9,1863 Mustered out Jan. 31/65; termexp'd. 

I 
|Nov. 30,1864! 

Feb. l,1863IMustered out for promotion Nor. 22, 

[1864. 
Oct. 22,1864| 
Nov. 1,1862 ; Mustered out for promotion Oct. 1/64. 

April 23,1864 Died of disease March 20, 1865. 

Oct. 10,1862J 



[Plymouth, April 20,1864;Mustered out September 18, 1864. 

! I 



| New Haven, April 
j Plymouth, Aug. 



Hartford, 
JMiddletown, 
! Orange, 
jN.Mancheste 
j Meriden, 
jNew Haven, 
| New Haven, 
! Woodstock, 
! New Haven, 
Southington 
New Haven, 
Norwich, 
Putnam, 
New Haven, 
New Haven, 
Meriden, 
New Haven, 
Fair Haven, 
Bridgeport, 
Bloomfield, 

New Haven, 

.Meriden, 

jOrange, 



July 

jDec. 

Oct: 

r|Nov. 

tMch. 

Mch. 

jMch. 

Mch. 

jMch. 
, jMch. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Feb. 

July 

July 

July 

Jan. 

JFeb. 

Oct. 

Mch. 



20,1864] 

28,1861 Prom. 1st Asst. Surg. Apr. 20, 1864 



1,1862 

1,1863 

29,1864 

30,1864 

10,1865 

10,1865 

10,1865 

21,1865 

81,1865 

21,1865 

26,1861 

26,1861 

21,1862 

1,1862 

1,1862 

4,1863 

29,1864 

29,1864 

29,1864 

10,1865 



Mch. 
Mch. 
Mch. 



10,1865 
10,1865 
10,1865 



Mustered out; term expired. 
Must'd out Feb. 17/65 ; term expired. 
Pro.Maj.Mh 21 '65; must'd out as Capt. Mh.]«, 
Must'd out Oct. 16/64; termexp'd. I «5. 
Honorably discharged Dec. 19, 1864. 
Promoted Lt. Colonel Oct. 29, 1864. 
Must'd out Oct. 31, '64 ; term exp'd. 
Oct. 25, '64; 
" (as 1st Lieut.) Nov. 23, '64. 
Commission revoked Mch. 22, 1865. 



126 adjutant-general's report. 

Seventh Regiment Infantry — Continued. 



Name and Rank. M 



Date of 
Commission. 



1st Li* ufi nant$. 

William II. Johnson, 

William W. Newman 

Willmr F. Goodyear, 
Lconidas Hitchcock. 
Benjamin A. Hill, 
William II. Haynes, 
Charles M. Shailer, 

Thomas L. Havden. 
Ossian L Hatch, 
William E. Phillips, 
Ira K. 1 licks, 
Charles J. Greene, 
Theo. C. Wildman, 
John Vankeuren, 
John I. Hutchinson, 
William S Marble, 
Charles E. Barker, 
Charles A. Wood, > 
John B. Young, 
Morton A. Taintor, 
Wiliard Austin, 
William II. Pierpont, 
Maurice 1). Parmelee 
Evelyn E. Stevens, 

2d Lieutenants. 
Nicholas Van Deuscn 
Albert W. Burgess, 
Maurice D. Parmeke 
Charles A. Wood, 
Elmer C. Jordan, 
Raphael Gilbert, 
William II. Augur, 
John B. Young, 
Byron Bradford, 
Henry B. Lee, 
Henry II. Pierce, 
Edwin J. Merriam, 
Newton Baldwin, 
Frank Hull, 
Henry B. Gill, 
Morton A. Taintor, 
William II. Haynes, 
Andrew H. Kinney, 
Albert M. Rolden, 
Dennis ( PBrten, 
Timothy G. Bush, 
John II. Bario, 



New Haven. 

Dan bury, 
( Grange, 
Etoxbury, 
Bloomneld, 

New Haven, 
1 1 ail lord, 

Hartford, 

Meriden, 

Woodstock, 

Bridgeport, 

Killingly, 

Danbury, 

New Britain, 

Cromwell, 

Bridgeport, 

Derby, 

Willi mant ic, 

Bridgeport, 

Colchester, 

New Haven, 

New Haven, 

New Haven, 

Clinton, 



Mch. 

Men. 

Mch. 

Mch. 

Oct 

M.h. 

Mch. 

Sept. 

Aug. 

Feb. 
Jan. 
July 
July 
1 tec. 
Mch. 
Mch. 
Feb. 
May 
.June 
Oct 

;oct. 

Oct. 
Mch. 
Mch. 



North Canaan Mch. 



Sprague, 

New Haven, 
Willimantic, 
N\w Haven, 
Cromwell, 
New Haven, 
Bridgeport, 

Woodstock, 
Derby, 

Hanover, 

Durham, 
North Haven. Mch 
Middletown, May 
< Grange, 

Colchester, 

New Haven, 

New Haven, 

Hartford, 

Meriden, 

Branford, 

Meriden, 



Oct. 
Mch. 
-Jan. 
Feb. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Mch. 
Mch. 
Mch. 



June 

June 
Oct. 

Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct 

Mch. 
Mch. 



10, 

1", 
1", 
10, 

2'.'. 

21, 
21, 

5, 
31, 
21, 
24, 

4, 

4, 
1, 

1, 

1, 
21, 

2, 
IS, 
29, 
29, 
29, 
10, 
1", 

1", 

29, 

21, 

17, 

1, 

1, 

1, 

1, 

l| 

1. 

1 

1 

2 

is| 
IS, 

25, 

29 
29, 
29, 
10 
10, 



Remarks. 



1865 
1 864 

1 861 Mustered out ; term expired. 

1861 Mustered out Sep.5/64 ; term exp'd. 

C .ii 't.Mh.-.'i, •*>.->; mnst'dootu i>t Lt.M. h. 
1863 Ma-tout Nov. 29/64; term ex. Ue.'cs. 
1863 Honoral.lv discharged April 29, '64. 
1863 Must'd out < >ct. 2."), '64 ; term exp'd. 

1863 -" Dec 19, '64; 

1864 " Oct. 25, '64; 
1864 " Oct. 25, '64; 

1864 Killed in action August 16, 1864 
1864 " " May 12, 1864. 
1864 Pro Capt.Oct 29/64; must'd out as 1st 
1864 Kill'd in act 'n Oct. 27/64. [Lt.Nov.23, 
1864 Prom. Capt Mch. 10, 1865. ['64. 

1864 Promoted Captain March 10, 1865. 

1865 Commission revoked March 22, '65. 

" 22, '65. 



1865 

1864 

[865 

1863 Promoted 1st Lieut. May 2, 1864. 

1863 Promoted Captain March 21, 1865. 

1863 Must'd out Dec. 20, '64 ; term exp'd. 

1863 Promoted Quartermaster Oct. 22/64. 

1863 Promoted 1st Lieut. June 13, 1864. 

1863 Must'd out Oct. 25, '64 ; term exp'd. 

1864 Killed in action August 16, 1S64. 
1864 Discharged, disability, Jan. 5, 1865. 
1864 Died of wound- October 6, 1864. 
1864 Must'd out Nov. 2.5, '64 ; term exp'd. 
1864 Killed in action May S, 1864. 
1864 Promoted Captain October 29, 1864. 
1864 " 1st Lieut. " 29, 1S64. 
1864 " lit Lieut. March 21, 1865. 
1864 " 1st Lieut. " 10,1865. 
1864 " Adjutant Nov. 30,1864. 

1864 " 1st Lieut. March 10, 1865. 

1865 ( ommission revoked March 22, 1865. 
•• 22,1865. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 127 

After the battle atOlustec, Fla., the Regiment remained in 
camp at Jacksonville until the 13th of April, when it em- 
barked on board transport and proceeded to Fort Monroe, 
thence to Gloucester Point, Va., and upon disembarking 
reported to General Wistar. 

On the 4th of May, re-embarking on board transport, the 
Regiment with the 10th Army Corps proceeded up James 
River to Bermuda Hundred. The Regiment was engaged 
in skirmishing with the enemy until the 80th of June, when 
it went into camp at Bermuda Hundred, in which position it 
remained until the 13th of August. On the 24th of August 
the Regiment changed position to the line in front of Peters- 
burg, and there remained until Sept. 25th. After the seve- 
ral actions occurring up to the 23th of October, the Regiment 
went into camp, and on the 81st of October was in position 
in line of works before Richmond. This Regiment formed 
a portion of the force transferred to New York Harbor from 
the 2d to the 14th day of November, returning on the 17th 
to its former position in front of Richmond, where it re- 
mained until the 3d of January. The Regiment participated 
in the several actions near Wilmington, N. O, and on the 
28th of February was encamped about ten miles from that 
place. 

No connected annual report of operations has been re- 
ceived, but reports of the part borne by the Regiment in 
several engagements are appended. 



128 adjutant-general's report. 



BATTLE OF OLUSTEE. 
Ul.AD-QuARTERS 2d BRIGADE, Ames' DIVISION,) 

Jacksonville, Fla., April 8th, 1864. i 
General: 

I have the honor to forward herewith my own report of the part 
taken by the Brigade, (7th Conn., 7th New Hampshire, and 8th U. S. 
Colored Troops,) and also Capt Skinner's report of the part taken 
by the 7th Conn, in the battle of Olustee, Feb. 20th, 1864. 
Very respectfully, 

Your Ob'd't Servant, 

JOS. R. HAWLEY, 

Colonel 1th Conn. Vols. 
Brig. Gen. II. J. Morse, 

Hartford, Conn. 



Head-Quarters Hawley's Brigade, | 
Jacksonville, Fla., 26th Feb., 1864.) 
Capt. P. R. Chadwtck, 

A. A. General, District Florida, — 
Sir: 

I have the honor to report concerning the part taken by the forces 
under my command in the battle fought at Olustee on the 20th inst. 

On the morning of the 20th, at Barber's Ford, my Brigade con- 
sisted of the 7th New Hampshire, Col. Joseph C. Abbott, numbering 
about 30 officers and 675 men, the 8th U. S. Colored Infantry, Col. 
Charles "W. Fribley, 21 officers and 554 men, and the 7th Conn., 
Capt. Benj. F. Skinner, 10 officers and 365 men: aggregate, 61 offi- 
cers and 1594 men. Deducting wagoners, hospital attendants, etc., 
and men broken down on the march, perhaps 1500 men went into the 
battle. We had ten days' supply of hard bread, and about three days 
of coffee and sugar. The 7th Connecticut and half of the 7th New 
Hampshire carried Spencer carbines, — the remainder, Springfield or 
Bridesburg rifles. Col. Henry's command of mounted men led the 
column, my Brigade followed, Capt. Hamilton's Light Battery, Co. E, 
3d U. S. Artillery, taking the road, and the regiments moving by 
the flank abreast thereof, the 7th N. H. and 7th Conn, on the right 
of the road, the 8th U. S. Colored Infantry on the left. Before 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 129 

reaching Sanderson, by Gen. Seymour's order, the 7th Conn, took 
the road, and kept about half a mile ahead of us. Two or three 
miles beyond Sanderson we came up with Col. Henry's command, 
apparently arranged for a bivouac. 

The rebels beginning to annoy our videttes, the General sent for a 
company, and soon for the whole of the 7th Conn., to throw out skir- 
mishers and move westward. Col. Henry's command soon followed 
them, and in a few minutes my Brigade moved on also. After going 
two or three miles, occasionally hearing a few shots, several discharges 
of artillery were heard, and we quickened our pace. I directed the 
8th U. S. C. Infantry, which was abreast of the 7th N. H. on the 
railroad on the left, to leave that, change direction to the right, and 
come nearer the highway. The General commanding sent me orders 
to get into action quickly. Taking the 7th N. H. and leaving the 
8th to go in on the left of a pond or swamp, near which was a por- 
tion of our artillery, we hurried on, the 7th N. H. moving by the 
flank, left in front. Lieut. Bradshaw indicated the general direction 
to me, and I sent Lieut. Van Keuren for definite orders. Diverging 
a little to the right again, to clear an open pond, I had the regiment 
brought into column by company, and closed en masse on the tenth 
company. The enemy's fire began to be felt, not very severely, but 
it was increasing as we approached. 

We met the skirmishers of the 7th Conn, falling back firing before 
the enemy, who showed, I judge, two battalions in line. I distinctly 
ordered the 7th X. H. to deploy on the 8th company, which would' 
have brought the left of the line near the pond. 

Somebody must have misunderstood the order, for a portion of the 
regiment was going wrong, when myself and staff and Col. Abbott 
repeated it vigorously, but vainly. All semblance of organization 
was lost in a few moments, save with about one company which faced 
the enemy and opened fire. The remainder constantly drifted back, 
suffering from the fire which a few moments' decision and energy 
would have checked, if not suppressed. 

Most of the officers went back with their men, trying to rally them. 
The brave color-bearer, Sergeant Thomas Symerington. Co. D, obeyed 
every word or signal, and sometimes faced the enemy alone. Though 
wounded, he carried the colors to the end of the battle. Lieut. Geo. 
W. Taylor, Co. B, Acting Adjutant of the regiment, was fearless and 
incessantly active, and I sorrow to record that later in the action he 
fell fatally wounded in the head. 

Lieut. Van Keuren, of my staff, asked a cavalry officer to deploy 
9 m 



130 adjutant-*; kneral's report. 

hifl company ami stop the fugitives, and the latter promptly complied. 
Col. Abbott obtained a Bimilar favor and gathered nearly two hundred 
of his men on the right of the field, where they kept up a lively fire 
until they heard the order to retreat Reporting the break to the 
General, I hastened hack, and after a short attempt to rally the scat- 
tered men, I met the colors and buglers of the 7th Conn., and the 
officers soon all gathered there with their reserves and skirmishers. 
They had been hotly engaged a very considerable time alone, and had 
an opportunity which I believe they improved to do good service. 
Col. Barton's Brigade vras just now engaged, and moving the 7th 
Conn, to a position a little to the left, and in rear of hifl left, I sent 
for the reserved ammunition, a portion of the battalion being entirely 
exhausted, and the others having a limited supply. Had they gone 
as tl- they would very soon have been compelled to fall back. 

As soon as the supply arrived, I moved the battalion forward on the 
left of Barton's Brigade, which was slowly and stubbornly retiring. 
The 8th U. S. Colored Infantry, moving up on the left, went into line 
and found itself in a very hot fight. The regiment is new. and was 
never before in battle, and I deem it creditable to both officers and 
men, that they endured so long and to the best of their ability returned 
a fire which killed and wounded over half their number. Col. Frib- 
ley died on the field, and the only other field officer present, Major 
Burritt, was severely wounded. They fell back, and were rallied on 
the edge of the field by the next in rank, Capt. R. C. Bailey. Three 
color-bearers and five of the color-guard were killed or wounded. 

The 7th Conn., having been brought to the positions above de- 
scribed, soon opened fire with guide sights at 600 yards upon a rebel 
column, and disordered and checked it. I kept them lying down 
quiet for a time, only a few of the men firing at single rebels or Bmall 
groups. Col. Montgomery's Brigade had come up. The 54th 3! 
Col. Ilallowell, went into action on our left, the 1st North Carolina, 
Lieut. Col. Reed, on our right, between us and Barton's retiring Brig- 
ade, went up into the field, halting and firing fiercely with its right 
well forward so as to form an angle of perhaps 120 degrees with the 
line of the 54th, with full space for us between. Just before they 
went up, the 7th Conn, advanced again a short distance, and lying 
down, opened fire for a short time with guide sights at 400 yards, 
upon the enemy fairly in view. I had before this sent Lieut. Van 
Keuren to the General to say that we seemed to be crowding the 
enemy's left, and to ask for orders, and about this time an aid came 
to say that the General wished me to fall back, as the enemy were 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 131 

only feinting on our right, and were preparing to flank us in force. I 
repeated what I had said to Lieut. Van Keuren, and waited. 

Permitting only such firing as seemed to be necessary and useful, 
Capt. Skinner held foot until the forces on our right and left had fallen 
back, when he went back in line a short distance, halted and faced 
the enemy a short time, and then moved by the right of companies to 
the rear some distance, to a new line of battle, where under my orders 
he halted and came into line on the left of a light battery, (which I 
do not know,) and with a body of cavalry on his left. The firing 
here was chiefly by artillery. 

After the battery went to the rear, we followed it to another line. 
Here all joined in the loud and defiant cheers, which, started by the 
General, rang along the whole line of our army, and showed that 
though defeated, we were not routed nor broken in spirit. 

We then moved to the field hospital, where we made a longer halt. 
Just before this, Col. Abbott reported to me, bringing a large portion 
of his command to his colors. Capt. Bailey also coming up with the 
8th United States, the General ordered them to continue their retreat. 
Not long after, he detailed the 7th Conn, to cover their retreat, by 
deploying across the rear of all the infantry. At Sanderson I placed 
the 7th New Hampshire and the 8th U. S. Colored Infantry in line 
north of the hamlet to check my advances in that direction. After 
the stragglers and wounded had been started, by the General's orders, 
I guarded the train, marching those two regiments by the flank and 
by the side of the wagons and ambulances to Baldwin, where we biv- 
ouacked on the ground we left eighteen hours before, having marched 
about thirty-two miles, and having been about three hours in battle. 
The 7th Conn, arrived an hour or two later, having marched without 
rest sixteen miles after the battle, with a large portion of its men de- 
ployed as skirmishers. 

On the morning of the 21st, my Brigade was ordered to follow the 
wagon train, with Colonel Montgomery's Brigade following me and 
under my command. 

We had gone half a mile when the 7th Conn, was again detached 
as a rear guard. It covered the rear, the mounted command of Col. 
Henry excepted, to Baldwin, and when all other forces on foot left, 
remained over night there with Col. Henry, on picket and fatigue, and 
after loading cars, pushed some a portion of the way, leaving Baldwin 
at 9 o'clock A. M. on the 22d. 

From Baldwin I went on to McGirth's creek, where the command 
bivouacked for the night in a good position. The train and Col. Bar- 



132 adjutant-general's report. 

Ion's command passed through, and Col. Montgomery took the 1st 
North Carolina on to Camp Finegan. At 7 o'clock the next morn- 
ing, with the 7th New Hampshire, 8th U. S. Colored Infantry, and 
54th Massachusetts, I started eastward. The General detached the 

54th Mann to remain for a time at Ten Mile Station, and by his orders 

I went with the other two regiments to Six Mile Creek, on the King's 
Road, on grand guard. The loss of the Brigade in the battle 
the 7th Nea Hampshire, 208; 8th U. S. Colored Infantry, 310; 7th 
Conn., 69 : aggregate killed, wounded and missing, 587 — about 37£ 
per cent. 

Col. Abhott did all in his power to rally his command, after that 
regiment, which has proved its valor on other held-. ><» strangely 
broke ; and its loss proves, that though not in good order, it did not 
go away from danger. 

I have already referred to the death of the brave Lieut. Taylor. 

Col. Fribley, of the 8th United States, a gallant and capable officer, 
fell mortally wounded while in the fearless discharge of his duty, and 
died on the field. It was a great loss to the regiment and the service. 
Major Burritt, of the same regiment, was severely wounded while 
bravely at work. 

The command devolved upon Capt. R. C. Bailey, who has since 
discharged his new duties with zeal and discretion. 

Capt. B. F. Skinner, who commanded the battalion of the 7th Con- 
necticut, (a large portion of the regiment being absent on veteran fur- 
loughs,) was on the sick list when the regiment took the field; but he 
performed his laborious duties with the energy and fearless bravery 
that have always characterized him, and his battalion received the 
hearty commendation of the General at the close of the fight. It is 
greatly regretted that he has felt compelled, by ill health, to quit the 
service. Lieut. Dempsey, of that regiment, a faithful, patriotic man, 
was killed early in the action. 

My staff, 1st Lieut. E. Lewis Moore, 7th Connecticut Volunteers, 
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, 1st Lieut. John Van Keuren, 7th 
Connecticut Volunteers, Acting Assistant Inspector-General, and 2d 
Lieut. Heber J. Davis, 7th New Hampshire, accompanied me closely, 
were mindful of every opportunity for careful service, and certainly 
no officers in similar positions ever did better. Lieut. Davis received 
a Minie ball in his neck in the midst of the engagement ; when an 
opportunity offered, he had the ball quickly extracted, and continued 
on duty. 

Dr. W. W. Brown, Surgeon 7th New Hampshire, Senior Medical 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 133 

Officer, and Lieut. W. T. Seward, 7th Conn. Vols., Brigade Quarter- 
master and Commissary, performed their duties admirably. Their 
labors on the 20th, and for two or three days after, were excessive 
and exhausting. Private Vinton, Co. K, 7th Conn. Vols., mounted 
orderly, had his horse twice shot and finally killed, but he soon found 
another and continued on duty. 

I send herewith, reports of the regimental commanders. 

I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully, 

Your Ob'd't Servant, 

JOSEPH R. HAWLEY, 
Col. 1th Conn. Vols., Com'oVg Brigade. 



Head-Quarters, 7th Conn. Vols., \ 

Six Mile Creek, \ 

Kings Road, Florida, Feb. 25th, 1864.) 

Lieutenant : 

I have the honor to make the following report for the information 
of the Colonel Commanding, of the part my command took in the 
engagement at Olustee, Florida, on the 20th inst. 

My command consisted of detachments from ten companies com- 
prising the 7th Connecticut Volunteers, consolidated and divided into 
four companies as follows : Companies A and G, commanded by Cap- 
tain C. C. Mills, assisted by 2d Lieut. Charles A. Wood, composed 
the first company ; Companies F, D and I, commanded by 1st Lieut. 
Jeremiah Townsend, and 2d Lieut. John Young, composed the second 
company ; Companies E and K, commanded by 1st Lieut. Robert 
Dempsey, composed the third company ; Companies B, C and H, 
commanded by Capt. John Thompson, and 2d Lieut. Raphael Gil- 
bert composed the fourth company ; Surgeon George C. Jarvis, 2d 
Lieut. John I. Hutchinson, Acting Adjutant, 2d Lieut. W. H. Augur, 
Acting Regimental Quartermaster ; amounting in all to ten commis- 
sioned officers, and three hundred and sixty-five enlisted men. 

The regiment left Barber's Ford at 7 o'clock on the morning of 
the 20th, in connection with the rest of Colonel Hawley's Brigade, 
which moved in four distinct columns. The 7th Connecticut formed 
the second column from the right, and moved on the right of the road in 



134 

this order for about live miles, when I was ordered by Colonel Haw- 
ley to march iny command into the road, and in advance of the brig- 
ade Afterwards, by direction of General Seymour, I held my regi- 
ment about half a milt- in advance, until we arrived at a station, 
(name unknown) two, or perhaps three miles beyond Sanderson, 
where I was directed by (icneral Sejmour to send forward two com- 
panies as skirmishers. I immediately ordered the two first compa- 
nies, under Captain Mills and Lieut. Townsend to move forward, 
which were deployed on the left of the railroad, the 2d company 
forming a reserve for the left of the line. I was also directed by the 
same authority to throw one company forward upon the right of the 
railroad as skirmishers and follow with the remainder of my force 
within supporting distance. 

Our advance soon came up with the enemy's advance guard and 
exchanged a few shots with them, when they retreated, firing occa- 
sionally as they went ; we followed them in this way about three 
miles, when, after firing a few shots from an advance battery, Capt. 
Elder's, the enemy replied with a battery of three or four guns, when 
I was directed by Gen. Seymour to go forward with the rest of my 
command, and if possible secure the enemy's battery. I moved the 
remainder of my command forward immediately in double quick 
time upon the right of the railroad for about three hundred yards, 
when we came up with my line of skirmishers. 

I immediately directed the remainder of the third company, which 
had been held in reserve, to deploy as skirmishers and move up to 
the support of the advanced line ; I also deployed the fourth com- 
pany with the same directions, the enemy having made a flank move- 
ment in order to mass his advance on our right. Capt. Mills fol- 
lowed, moving a portion of his command across, and to the right of 
the railroad, the whole forming a very strong line of skirmishers 
three or four hundred yards in length. I immediately pushed the 
line forward as fast as possible, paying particular attention to the 
enemy's batteries, the strength of which had developed itself upon 
the left of our line to the right of the railroad. After moving up 
two or three hundred yards, I found the enemy drawn up in line to 
receive us and in position to support their battery, the enemy here 
showing a front of five regiments, flanked on the right and left by 
cavalry, which made occasional demonstrations upon our flanks, but 
were easily turned back in disorder, after a few moments' attention 
from our seven-shooters. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY/ 135 

Supposing that support was close at hand, I pushed forward, firing 
rapidly as I went, which caused the enemy to give ground to us, I 
should judge two hundred yards, in some confusion, but firing as they 
withdrew. Here I discovered that the enemy were entrenched and 
delivered well directed vollies of musketry. I found also that my 
ammunition was very nearly expended, some of my new men being 
entirely out, there was no support in sight, I had already pushed so 
far in the enemy's center that my line formed a semi-circle, and that 
I was receiving the enemy's fire from three sides. At this juncture I 
determined to withdraw and save my command, which was done at 
the proper time, for had I remained there five minutes longer my 
whole command would have been swallowed up in the enemy's ad- 
vance. My men withdrew rapidly, those who had ammunition fired 
as they withdrew, and divided to the right and left in order to un- 
mask the 7th New Hampshire Volunteers who approached. After I 
had withdrawn about four hundred yards, I directed my course to- 
wards our regiment, right where I found that portion of my com- 
mand which had gone to the right. 

Some were entangled with a portion of the New Hampshire Vol- 
unteers, when I withdrew as soon as possible and moved by the flank 
to the left, where I found Lieut, and Acting Adjutant Hutchinson, 
who had rallied about one hundred men around the colors. I was 
soon found by Capt. Mills and Lieut. Tovvnsend with most of their 
commands. I re-organized the regiment there, and by direction of 
Colonel Hawley, the men lay down to wait a supply of ammunition 
which had been sent for, and was accordingly furnished. We after- 
wards moved forward to fill a gap in the line occasioned by the 
advance of a regiment upon each side of us. Here the enemy ap- 
peared about six hundred yards in front of us, and a little to the left. 
By direction of Colonel Hawley, our guide sights were raised to six 
hundred yards, when we opened fire by file, which broke up the 
enemy's column and checked his advance. 

We remained in this position occasionally firing, or permitting a 
portion of the men to fire as the enemy showed himself, until by di- 
rection from the same authority we moved to the rear about one hun- 
dred yards, our forces on the right and left being on the retreat, then 
faced about, and putting the guide sights at four hundred yards, 
opened an effective fire for a few minutes. Soon after this the en- 
gagement closed, though we took position in line two or three times. 

I was directed by Colonel Hawley to report to Colonel Barton of 



136 A D J U T A N T - G K \ E It A L ' S REPORT. 

the 48th New York Volunteers, which I accordingly did, and by his 
direction deployed 125 of my men as rear guard for th<- army (which 
had dow left the held.) making a line of nearly half a mile in length, 
.dry being behind me. I occupied this relative position 
and marched in this manner until I readied •• Barber's Kurd," for a 
distance <-i' abeol eighteen miles from the ■ Battle Field." when I 
marcle d my command on to same ground that it had occupied before 
leaving M Barber's Ford" the morning before, my men having marched 
a distance of thirty-six miles, eighteen of which were marched with- 
out rest, and over bad ground. Many swampy ditches, pickets and 
fenci - intervened to obstruct my march. Arriving here about three 
o'clock in the morning of the 21st, I remained until about nine o'clock 
A. M., when I was directed by Colonel Hawdey to move with the 
brigade. My position being upon the left of the New Hampshire 
Volunteers, I moved in this way about three-quarters of a mile on 
the road to Baldwin, when I was directed by the same authority to 
go back to k * Barber's Ford" and report to Colonel Barton, who or- 
dered me to deploy my men in the same manner as the night before 
as a rear guard. I moved in the manner directed until we reached 
Baldwin, where I recalled my skirmishers by permission of Colonel 
Barton, and marched my men inside of the town for the purpose of 
securing the knapsacks belonging to my command, the same having 
been left there under guard. This done, I was directed by General 
Seymour to remain in Baldwin over night, all others except mounted 
men having continued their retreat, and to throw T out a line of pick- 
ets to cover our rear. Col. Henry soon came into town with his 
command and ordered a detail from my command to load the cars 
which came in about three o'clock the next morning. He afterwards 
ordered me to send off half of my command with the train. I also 
by his directions scattered turpentine and rosin around in the railroad 
buildings, preparatory to burning the same. Col. Henry directed 
me to march with the rot of my command to Jacksonville, and go 
by the way of the railroad. Finding between Baldwin and Ten-Mile 
Station, three cars which belonged to the train which left Baldwin in 
the morning, one of which had four hundred boxes of hard bread, 
Capt. Mills pushed them three miles, with a portion of my command, 
having volunteered for the purpose. 

Arriving at Ten-Mile Station, I found the companies which I had 
sent off in the morning. After resting there half an hour I resumed 
my march, arriving in Jacksonville about 7 o'clock, having marched 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 137 

twenty miles, and, by direction of Gen. Seymour, I encamped in front 
of the " Redoubt." 

Next morning, by direction of the same authority, I moved forward 
about six hundred yards, and to the right across the railroad, where I 
remained until the next day or two, when, by order of Gen. Seymour, 
I joined the brigade on King's road at Six-Mile Creek. 

Of my command, I can speak only in the highest terms, both offi- 
cers and men exhibiting the utmost coolness, bravery and patience ; 
in fact it was a feature to be noticed and praised, that when called to 
perform arduous duties it was done with a cheerfulness ^really re- 
markable. 

Enclosed you will find a list of casualties. 
I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully, 

Your ob't servant, 

B. F. SKINNER, 

Captain 1th Conn. Vols. Corridg Regiment. 
To 

Lieut. E. Lewis Moore, 

A. A. A. Gen% Hawley's Brigade. 
Official. 

E. Lewis Moore, 

1st Lieut, and Adjt. 1th C. V., 

A. A. A. G. 

Head-Quarters 7th Reg't Conn. Vols., \ 
Bermuda Hundred, Va., May 11, 1864. ) 
General]: 

I have the honor to report the part taken by my command in the 
action at Chester Station, Va., May 10th, 1864, as follows: left 
camp at Bermuda Hundred, at 4 A. M. on the morning of the 9th 
inst., with two Field, two Staff, one Acting Adjutant, one Acting 
Reg. Quartermaster, 17 Line Officers, and 720 enlisted men, and 
moved directly on to the Richmond and Petersburg railroad, at 
Chester station, passing up the railroad to Grove Hill station, and 
were held in reserve to the 18th corps, who were engaging the enemy 
on the left and in front of Pocahontas. At about 9 P. M. was ordered 
back to a position at the junction of the turnpike and railroad, to pro- 
tect the rear, where we bivouacked for the night. About 7 o'clock 
on the morning of the 10th, the brigade of which we formed a part, 
was ordered to move both ways on the railroad, destroying it and the 
telegraph, the right wing moving upon the turnpike to destroy the 



138 adjutant-general's report. 

telegraph, the left on the railroad to protect the 6th Connecticut Vol- 
unteers while destroying the railroad. The right wing, under my 
command, had proceeded about one and a half miles, destroying the 
telegraph, when we were ordered forward at a quick pace. Arriving 
at the top of the hill, to the right of, and near Chester station, we 
were ordered int.) line of battle on a road leading from the right of 
the turnpike, and immediately threw out Company D, under Captain 
Townsend, as skirmishers. We were soon joined by the left wing, 
under Major Sanford. Two companies, E, and H, under Captain 
Dennis, were immediately sent to support a battery upon a hill a little 
in front of our line. I then ordered Major Sanford, with Compa- 
nies B and K, to proceed to the top of the hill and engage the enemy. 
I was ordered to take the remaining companies, A, C, F, G and I, and 
cross to the left of the turnpike to support the line on that side, which 
was being fiercely engaged. I was then ordered to send three com- 
panies, under Captain Bacon, to the right of the turnpike, where 
they engaged the enemy's skirmishers and drove them back. 

I cannot speak too highly of the conduct of both officers and men 
under my command during the entire engagement. Great credit is 
also due to Surgeons Jarvis and Hine for their efficiency. Below 
is appended a list of casualties. 

WOUNDED. 

Company B. 
Private, Charles Vibberts. 

Company D. 
Privates, John Riley. 

Theodore Benedict. 
Henry S. Cole. 

Company F. - 
Private, Charles F. Dubois. 

Company H. 

Private, Jerome Snow. 

Company I. 
Private, Edward Eagan. 

Company K. 
Private, Joseph Voght. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 139 

MISSING. 

Company H. 
Private, Lazarus Straus. 

Accompanying this is Major Sanford's report of the detachment 
under his command. 

I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. C. RODMAN, 

Lieut. Col. Commanding Reg't. 
Brig. Gen. Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 



Head-Quarters 7th Conn. Vols.,) 
Bermuda Hundred, Va., May 11, 1864.) 
Colonel : 

I have the honor to report the part taken, in the late action, by 
the companies under my command as follows : 

After leaving the regiment on the morning of the 10th, with the 
left wing of the command, I moved up the railroad towards Chester 
station, covering the 6th Connecticut Volunteers, who were destroy- 
ing the railroad. I remained there nearly an hour, when I was 
ordered on the turnpike to join the left of the column. I pushed 
forward at a rapid pace, arriving just as the right wing had got into 
line of battle to the right of the turnpike. I was ordered to send 
two companies, E and H, under Captain Dennis, forward to support 
a battery. The three remaining were joined to the regiment. You 
then ordered me forward with two companies, B and K. I proceeded 
to the top of the hill, where I was joined by Captain Dennis, with the 
two companies under his command. I threw the right of my line a 
little forward and opened fire on the left flank of the enemy, stationed 
in the woods, and drove them back. We engaged the enemy at inter- 
vals, who were trying to take a piece of artillery, which had been 
abandoned by the 4th N. J., and was near their lines. I drove them 
back at every attempt. The enemy opened with two pieces of artil- 



140 adjutant-general's report. 

lery, and T sent a request for a section of battery to silence that of 
the enemy. One piece of the 1th N. J. was sent to my position and 
immediately opened upon them. I then ordered Company K, under 
command of Lieutenant Barker, to move forward and brin^ in the 
abandoned piece, which he suc ceede d in doing. I placed the piece in 
position, manning it with men from Company K, taking ammunition 
from a caisson which was also abandoned by the 4th N. J., all the 
horses having been shot. 

After firing about ten shots from that piece, and as many more 
from the one already there, we drove the enemy's battery from its 
position. I then turned the pie^e over to the Lieutenant in charge 
of the one sent there, it belonging to that battery. I was then ordered 
to fall back slowly. After falling back a few hundred yards, I found 
two companies, C and G, on the left of the road, and one, D, on the 
right. I took command of the whole, (seven in all,) forming them in 
column by company, and marched them to the rear. After proceed- 
ing a few hundred yards, I was ordered across the field to the right of 
the turnpike, and took position on a cross road, where I remained 
about one hour. I was then ordered to take position on the left of the 
169th New York Volunteers, where I found the other three companies, 
under command of Captain Bacon, supporting a section of the 1st 
Connecticut Battery. We remained there until dark, and then were 
ordered to camp. 

Of the conduct of the officers and men under my command during 
the engagement, I can but speak in terms of the highest praise, par- 
ticularly of Lieutenant Barker and his company, for their gallant 
conduct in rescuing the gun which had been abandoned, and was 
near the enemy's line. On attempting to work the piece, I could find 
no lanyard, and my thanks are due to private Clapp, of company K, 
for the promptness and ingenuity displayed in forming one from a 
piece of telegraph wire near at hand. 

I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

0. S. SANFORD, 

Major 1th Reg't C. V., ComoTg Detachment, 

Lieut. Col. D. C. Rodman, 

Commanding 1th C. V. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 141 

Head -Quarters 7th C. V., * 

Bermuda Hundred, May 17th, 1864. J 
General : 

I have the honor to report the part taken by my command in the 
action of May 12th, 13th and 14th. 

Left camp at three P. M. on the 12th, with twenty-one commissioned 
officers, and six hundred and ten enlisted men, having the right of the 
2d Brigade, 1st Division, 10th Army Corps, Colonel Hawley com- 
manding. Moved out on the Petersburg and Richmond turnpike, in 
the vicinity of Chester station, at Pudur's plantation, Threw out 
one hundred and fifty men as pickets, and bivouacked for the night. 
Put under arms at about six o'clock on the 13th, and moved on to 
the railroad at Clover Hill Junction, moving on about eight miles to 
the right and rear of the enemy's entrenchments, where we supported 
the 3d New Hampshire Volunteers, who were engaging the enemy, 
and were driving them out of their works. Bivouacked in their en- 
trenchments for the night, having four companies on picket. At 
about daylight on the morning of the 14th, Major Sanford moved 
forward with five companies, supporting the left of Turner's Division, 
who were advancing on the enemy. About 7 A. M. the other five 
companies moved forward, joining Major Sanford's command, and 
formed in line of battle at the foot of the hill in the woods, where 
the enemy were in strong position at the top of the hill, in earthworks. 
A strong line was thrown out as skirmishers, under command of Cap- 
tain Dennis, where they fought desperately two hours, expending all 
their ammunition, and the fresh supply sent. Several men were badly 
wounded, lying in the line of battle. 1st Sergeant English, Sergeant 
Ripley, Company H, and 1st Sergeant Keyes, Company A, behaved 
with great gallantry. Sergeant English had been hit in the foot, 
which made him quite lame, but he persisted in moving forward. 
About 3J P. M. the line, Colonel Hawley commanding, was ordered 
forward on the charge, going up with the 7th New Hampshire Volun- 
teers on the left, the 3d New Hampshire volunteers in reserve, to the 
summit of the slope, where a house had been burned, forcing the 
enemy to take to their earthworks, about four hundred yards in front, 
leaving us in possession of the top of the hill, where fighting con- 
tinued at intervals until dark. Just about dark the rebels opened 
fire furiously, and charged from their works with desperation. We 
opened for about a minute and a half with the full rapidity of the 
Spencer carbine. The rebel's fire was completely subdued and the 
charge repulsed. 



142 adjutant-general's report. 

The regiment being relieved by the 3rd N. H. Vols., we retired to 
their rear, and bivouacked for the night. The conduct of the officers 
and men under my command, was, without a single exception, deserv- 
ing of great praise. They distinguished themselves throughout by 
their gallantry. I would make special mention of Lieut. Charles A. 
Wood, who was mortally wounded. 

Enclosed is a li-t of casualties. 

I have the honor to be, 
Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

D. C. RODMAN, 

Lieut. Colonel ComoVg. 

Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General, State of Conn. 

List of Casualties, occurring in the Seventh Reft Conn. Vols., May 
12th, 13th and Uth, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company A. 
1st Sergeant, David D. Keys. 

Company B. 
Corporal, William McEwen. 
Privates, Luke H. Lannagan. James Linton. 

Company C 
Private, George W. Andrus. 

Company D. 
Private, Darius A. Veats. 

Company E. 
Privates, Henry Kimberly. Edward Sage. 



Company G. 



2nd Lieut., Charles A. Wood. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 143 

Company H. 
Sergeant, Charles H. Ripley. 

Privates, Carl Ackerman, Private, William Covey. 

James Elderkin, 

Company I. 
Private, Eleazer Nodine. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Privates, Spencer H. Burnham, Privates, Daniel Jones, 
John Gagion, William Reid. 

John Grimes, 

Company B. 

1st Sergeant, Frederick H. Welton. 

Corporal, Chauncey A. Bacon. 

Privates, Alvin W. Bunnell, Privates, Felix Lavoe, 

Walter T. Clark, Michael La Force, 

John Dockrey, John Man ion, 

John Flannegan, Francis McNarma, 

Richard H. Hunter, Andrew Stuart. 

Company C. 
Sergeant, Alfred P. Greene. 
Privates, James Kewell, Privates, Isaiah L. Baker, 

Charles W. Yale, Soloman Leasure, 

Durick H. Roberts, 

Company D. 

Privates, George W. Banker, Privates, John Riley, 

James Ballard, George Webb, 

Henry S. Coles, Francis Webb, 

Charles Dolph, George B. Waterman, 

James Howard, William Wilson. 
William Hall, 

Company E. 
Sergeant, Joseph O. Banning. 

Privates, Thomas Dobbyn, Private, Roland Holt . 

James Wooster, 



1U 



adjutant-general's report. 



COHPAJR 

1st Sergeant, William II. Pierpont 

Privates, Jean Petit, 



Denman L. Shepard. 



Company G. 
Privates, William II. Corsa, Privates, Henry Page, 

Israel G Botsford, John Phile, 

Henry A. Kirtland, Gilbert H. Young. 



COMPANY 
1st Sergeant, William S. English. 
Corporal, William P. Carroll. 
Privates, John M. Blood, 

Francis W. Barnes, 
Joseph A. Bowen, 
Thomas Davidson, 
Horace Eldridge, 
William H. Harrington 
Ellibus S. Manwaring, 



H. 



Privates, James Maley, 

Henry B. Peckham, 
Daniel Sullivan, 
John Sullivan, 
Elisha Welch, 
Frederick Waterman. 



Company I. 

Sergeant, Daniel Morgan. 
Privates, William N. Stevens, 

Company K. 

Corporal, Henry W. Brown, May 14th. 

Privates, Daniel Stead, May 13th. 

Silas H. Amidon, May 14th. 
Albro B. Darby, 
Franklin L. Dannon, " 

Paul Heyne, " 

Cpnrad Lettus, " 

George F. Plaskett, " 

Lewi- Rounsavell, " 

Theodore K« " 

John Schaffner, " 

Company I. 

Privates, John Murray, Missing, May 14th. 
John Morrison, u " 



Wesley E. Preston. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 145 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, - - - - - 14 

Wounded, - - - - - 76 

Missing, ----- 2 

Total, - - 92 

':} 



Head-Quarters 7th Regt. Conn. Vols., 
General : 



Bermuda Hundred, Va., May 17, 1864. 



I have the honor to report the part taken by this command, consist- 
ing of 17 commissioned officers, and 510 enlisted men, in the action 
of May 16th, 1864. 

We left the bivouac occupied by the 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 10th 
A. C, about dark, on the night of the loth inst., and proceeded to the 
front to relieve the 3d New Hampshire Vols., who were on duty in 
the rifle pits, about 400 yards in front of the enemy's works, on the 
left of the position occupied by our forces. I immediately sent out 
two men from each company, about 100 yards to the front of our posi- 
tion, as pickets, with instructions to fire and fall back, if the enemy 
advanced in force. Everything remained quiet until about 4 o'clock 
on the morning of the 16th, when heavy firing and cheering was 
heard on the right of our lines, increasing and nearing our position, 
until about 5 o'clock, when the enemy tried to force the lines on our 
left, and were driven back. In about fifteen minutes the picket in 
our front fired and fell back, reporting the enemy advancing in force. 
It being very foggy at the time, they could not be seen until within 
forty or fifty yards of our position. I immediately opened upon them, 
driving them back with great loss. They rallied and advanced a sec- 
ond and third time, with a determination to carry the position, but 
were at each attempt repulsed, leaving the dead and wounded in great 
numbers on our front. I was soon informed that the enemy had 
forced the line back on my right, and were pouring an enfilading fire 
upon my right flank. I ordered a fire to be opened from an angle in 
the center of my lines in that direction, and from my right flank com- 
pany, which silenced the enemy for a short time. I sent word to the 
Colonel commanding Brigade to have my right supported, and I 
would hold the position against any force. The fog lifting about that 
time, I could see the enemy about 100 yards on my right flank, secre- 
10 



146 adjutant-cenrral's report. 

ted behind ;i fence and trees picking my men off. I set sharp shoot- 
er- at work, and succeeded in keeping them down. I then sent word 

that my right wm unsupported Col. Henry, 40th Mass. Volt, came 
and looked at the position occupied by the enemy, and immediately 
poshed \i\< command forward, and drove them back. I soon received 
orders to leave B strong picket force and fall hack. I had fifteen men 
from each coinj any selected to remain under charge of Lieots. Par- 
ker, Gilbert and Young, the whole under command of Capt. Dennis, 
and W0JS about to fall back with tie- rest of my command, when I re- 
ceived orders to fall back immediately with the whole, and form in 
the field to the rear of the woods. I then gave orders, but the men 
who had been selected to stay, not hearing it, remained. We fell 
back rapidly, the enemy pouring volley after volley into us, over the 
top of their works, and coming out in thousands to sweep the little 
band (which had been left behind, and were pouring a murderous fire 
into them) from their po-ition. Arriving in the open field, I received 
orders to fall back to a position in the woods, across the field, and 
form in the rear of the 3d N. II. Vols. My ammunition being near- 
ly expended, I was ordered to take a position in a field about 1000 
yards to the rear, and right, where we remained a short time, and 
being joined by the od X. H. Vols., we marched slowly back to a 
position upon a hill to the left of the turnpike, where we remained a 
short time, and were then marched across a ravine to the rear, taking 
a position on the ground occupied by us on the night of the 12th, re- 
maining about half an hour, and were then moved back, and across 
the ravine, to the place previously occupied, to form a part of the rear 
guard, remaining three hours, and falling slowly back, and bringing 
up the rear. Arrived in camp at about 8 o'clock P. M. 

I will mention the names of Corporals Walker and Braman ; Pri- 
vates Lamphere and Holmes, Co. H; Private- Painter. Miner, Jack- 
son and Wright, Co. C ; and Privates D. Andrews and Brockett, Co. 
E, who volunteered to reconnoiter in our front after the enemy were 
driven back, and went forward into the fog, upon the ground just va- 
cated by the enemy. And of the fifteen men from each company left 
back, too much praise can not be given them for their conduct in hold- 
ing the rifle pits, until the rest of the command had gotten safely into 
the woods ; but for them the whole command must have been badly 
cut up. 

All, officers and men, behaved with great credit to themselves and 
the regiment, and could the right of our lines been held, we could 
have holdeu our position against any force brought before it, for with 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 147 

the "Spencer Carbine," plenty of ammunition, and a determined set 
of men, nothing can stand before them. 
Enclosed is a list of casualties. 

I am, General, 

Very Respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

O. S. SANFORD, 

Major 1th Conn. Vols., ComoVg Reg't. 

Bjrig.-Gen'l H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 

Hartford, Conn. 



List of Casualties in the Seventh Conn. Vols., occurring in the action 
of Mag 16th, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company A. 
Corporals, T&Yeveit Bailey. 

Henry C. Parker. 
Privates, George Vibert. 

George C. Saxton. 

Company C. • 
Private, Abraham Miner. 

Company D. 
Sergeants, Andrew B. Nichols. 

Augustus Felch. 
Privates, Philip Fortune. 

Daniel B. Shelton. 

John Mildoon. 

Company F. 
Sergeant, L. Hobart Bailey. 
Private, Thomas Fillburn. 

Company H. 
1st Sergt.yWiUiam S. English. 



148 adjutant-general's report. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Corporal, William Tyler. 
Private, Oscar Vibert. 

Company B. 
Private, Gershom Redway. 

Company D. 
Privates, James Ballard. 

Albert Van Tassell. 
William Long. 
John Z. Smith. 

Company E. 
Private, George Maxam. 

Company F. 
Privates, George H. Smith. 
Thomas Mulvey. 
John Hine. 

Company G. 
Privates, John H. Booth. 

William H. Coley. 
William D. Reid. 
Charles McVee. 

Company H. 
Corporal, Nicholas Walker. 
Private, Christopher Holmes. 

MISSING. 
Company A. 
Sergeant, Oliver D. Selden. Privates, John Megan. 

Privates, George N. Trowbridge. John Miner. 

Henry A. Clark. John Hoffman. 

Robert K. Reid. Samuel II. Stark. 

Edward Fisher. Frederick John. 

John Gabriel. Alfred Blanchard. 

Robert K. Reid. 






SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 149 

Company B. 
2d Lieut., Raphael Gilbert. Privates, James Mehan. 

Sergeant, John Day. Joel S. Smith. 

Corporal, Milo D.Smith. Peter McMahon. 

Private, Peter Kelley. 

Company C. 

Private, Robert Thompson. Private, Henry Deangelist. 

Company D. 

Corporal, Frank R. Nash. Corporal, Edward Ayres. 

Privates, Samuel P. Armstrong. Privates, John McDermott. 

John Davis. John Northrup. 

Christian Kohelenburg. George W. Raymond. 

Robert Keowen. Asa Strickland. 

Samuel K. Lynes. Isaac Weed. 

Edwin Lewis. Charles Weed. 

Domencia Mattencia. Charles Ward. 

Company E. 
Private, Garrett Rynders. Private, Patrick Quigley. 

Company F. 
Privates, Matthew Beresford. Privates, Stephen Richards. 
Anthony Brepson. Henry V. Sims. 

Robert Campbell. . David Sliney. 

Edward D. Phelps. 

Company G. 
Corporal, Eleazer Gorham. Privates, Thomas Swift. 

Privates, Jeremiah Brown. Samuel H. Whittaker. 

Alexander Potocki. Jerome Baldwin. 

Albert G. Pratt. 



Company H. 



Private, Lorenzo Hall. 



Company I. 

Corporals, John Dales. Privates, Henry Clark. 

William J. Ingraham. Malcom T. Feeley. 

Henry R. Chamberlain. John Keagan. 



150 adjutant-general's report. 

Privates, Patrick McMahoa. Horace II. Messenger. 

Kufus AggetL Michael Nichols. 

Nicholas Brown. Wm. A. Southwick. 

George Bayer. Hugh Ward. 

William Carroll. Edward O' Grady. 

Edward Craw. 

Company K. 
Private, Ernest Bahring. Private, Terrence Mehan. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Commissioned Officers, - - 

Enlisted Men, - - - 13 

Wounded, Enlisted Men, - - - 17 

Missing, Commissioned Officers, - 1 

Enlisted Men, - - - 73 



Total, - - - 104 



Camp of the 7th Regiment Conn. Vols., \ 
Near Bermuda Hundred, Va., June 3d, 18G4. ) 
General : 

I have the honor to report that this Regiment, numbering fifteen 
officers and three hundred and twenty-four enlisted men, Major O. S. 
Sanford commanding, relieved the 3d New Hampshire Vols., upon 
the picket line at dusk on the evening of Wednesday, June 1st. 

Companies A, F, I) and I were posted across the open ground in 
front of our works between Batteries 4 and 5, in the Bhallow and dis- 
connected rifle-pits occupied by the picket force. The right of these 
four companies, of which I was placed in charge, touched the woods 
where Companies C and H, under Capt. Dennis, were posted upon a 
line turning abruptly to the front, along the edge of the woods, and at 
a distance of some seventy yards, making another sharp turn into the 
woods. Major Sanford made his Head-Quarters with these two com- 
panies. On the left of the open field, Co. I extended a few rods into 
the woods, and the line was continued by Cos. B, G, K, and E, under 
Gapt. Mills, over ground heavily wooded, and much broken by deep 
ravines. The whole line was without reserves nearer than the in- 
trenchments, and had become extremely attenuated by the diminish- 
ing strength of regiments successively relieving each other. Acros* 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 151 

the open field the enemy's line of pickets was 150 yards from ours, 
but in the woods, on each side, it came at some points to within 20 
yards of our own. 

Up to half an hour after sunrise on the 2d, there was perfect quiet 
along our entire front, although towards midnight a furious cannonade 
had been kept up for an hour over our heads, by the rebel batteries. 

At that time an attack was commenced along our whole line, by the 
enemy's pickets, advancing from their posts as a line of skirmishers, 
strongly reinforced, and two or three feet apart. In the woods, on the 
left, this attack was extremely rapid and sudden ; a few steps placed 
the enemy in our pits, in a position which, favored by the direction of 
part of the line, enabled them to cut off and capture a large part of 
Co. B. Such part of Capt. Mills' command as was not captured, fell 
back slowly, contesting the ground, to a position nearer the works, 
which they held until later in the morning, when they were reinforced 
and reoccupied and held their first position. 

In the open field, the advance of the enemy began a few moments 
after firing had been heard on the left. The enemy moved toward us 
in good line, but slowly and hesitatingly. I opened fire along the 
whole line, and in two minutes they had all dropped to the ground, 
where they lay, firing from such cover as they could get, for a few 
minutes longer, when the entire line rose and ran to the shelter of 
their rifle-pits, at full speed, followed by our cheers and bullets. 
From this cover they never ventured again, contenting themselves 
with a dropping fire from it, until we abandoned our entire line. On 
the right of the line, the movement of the enemy was by a dash 
across that part of the line which ran along the edge of the woods, 
nearly at right angles with the general direction of the line. This 
movement, of which at the time I had no information, cut off nearly 
all of the two companies posted there, together with the Major com- 
manding the regiment. Word had already been passed to me repeat- 
edly along the line, that "our left was turned," "was cut off," "had 
fallen back." and at last that the enemy were occupying our rifle-pits 
on the left. I refused to believe these statements, having great confi- 
dence in the strength of that position, until I saw our skirmishers 
falling back across the open field toward the works ; but I passed the 
word to Major Sanford on the right. ' No communication had yet 
reached me from that officer. I had seen a body of thirty or forty 
rebels dash from their rifle-pits into the woods in a direction that 
placed them in the rear of Cos. C and H ; groups of our men now 
began to be led to the rear of the rebel lines under guard ; straggling 



152 adjutant-general's report. 

skirmishers were seen falling back toward the works on our right ; 
the enemy's lire began to enfilade our lines from the woods on the 
right, — the position was critical. I sent at last the question to the 
right, " Where is Major San ford ? " The answer came back, "He is 
cut off." Up to this time my duty had been simply to hold my 
position and wait orders ; it now became necessary to act. The choice 
was plainly between capture and a perilous retreat across the open 
fields to our works. I therefore gave the order with a reluctance 
which I never felt before in performing a military duty, to fall back* 
This order was executed after all the rest of the division line of picket 
had given way. under a severe lire from the enemy, and across an un- 
protected field, but with little loss ; and painful as it always is to order 
a retreat, I had the satisfaction of knowing that the order saved a 
hundred men and rifles to the service, and of receiving the unqualified 
approval of my Brigade, Division and Corps Commanders for the 
course adopted. 

On the extreme left a part of Company E, in a favorable position, 
did not leave their ground at all. The men who fell back to the 
works were re-organized, and pushed forward to the picket line, for 
the most part on the left ; the entire line, except at the former posts 
of Companies C and H, were gradually re-established and held. 

The conduct of officers and men throughout the affair was admira- 
ble, but I may be permitted to speak especially of the extraordinary 
coolness and courage of Captain Charles C. Mills of Company G, 
who received, early in the fight, a wound which it is greatly feared 
may be mortal. 

The list of casualties enclosed, shows our loss to be in numbers 
about 30 per centum of those engaged, and seven out of fifteen officers. 
The actual loss sustained by the regiment, in these officers, is quite 
inadequately represented by these figures. 

I have the honor to be, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

THEODORE BACON, 

Capt Comd'g 1th C. V. 
Brig. Gen. II. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 






SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 153 

List of Casualties in the 1th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, during 
engagement of June 2d, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company E. 

Private, James N. Wooster. 

Company K. 
Privates, Charles Bethker. 
Paul Heyne. . 

WOUNDED. 

Field and Staff. 
Sergeant Major, Lucas Sutliff, — left arm, flesh wound. 

Company A. 
2d Lieut, Byron Bradford, — leg, slight. 

Company B. 
Private, James Quinn, — since died in hospital. 

Company E. 
1st Sergeant, William H. Johnson, — left side, severe. 

Company G. 
Captain, Charles C. Mills, — right breast, severe. 
Sergeant, Richard J. Hawthorn, — left side of abdomen, slight. 
Corporal, John S. Pardee, — head, slight. 
Privates, Charles F. Ailing, — left ankle, slight. 
Stephen W. Finch, — right hand. 

Company H. 
1st Lieut., William S. Marble, — right shoulder, severe. 

Company K. 

Sergeant, John Smith, — left thigh, severe. 
Corporal, Elisha Clapp, — right kr.ee, severe. 
Private, Henry S. Brandt, — head, slight. 

PRISONERS OF WAR. 

Major, Oliver S. Sanford. 

2d Asst. Surgeon, Samuel B. Shepard. 



154 



ADJIJTAiNT-G E N E I! A L ' S REPORT. 



Compact A. 
Privates, Lola B. Filley. 

John Ryan. 

Solomon Adams* 

Robert Reid. 
Musician, Seymour L. White, — wounded both legs, severe. 

Company B. 
Sergeant, George W. Cone. Private*, Thomas Kennedy. 



Corporal, Robert Bissell. 
Privatet, Sylvester Bryant 

James Dougherty. 
Horatio P. Forkey. 
Henry Fritts. 
Henry P. Hughes. 
David A. Henderson. 
Calvin Jackman. 



Martin Killian. 
Joseph Smith. 
Charles G. Thrall. 
Charles W. Yibberts. 
Felix Savoe. 
Horace S. Warren. 
John Riley. 



Company C. 



1st Sergeant, Ira B. Smith. 
Sergeants, Alfred P. Greene. 

Augustus Campbell. 
Corporals, Charles E. Hamilton. 

William C. Cutler. 

Watson W. Davis. 

John A. Leeds. 
Privates, James W. Belden. 

Levi Barnes. 

Bernard G. Bassett. 

Joseph Blankhorn. 

Kenus Clark. 

Burt CotterelL 

Charles Holmes. 

Anson Goodnough. 

Charles B. Jackson. 



Privates, John A. Lego. 

Swan L. Lesure. 
Charles McWhinnie. 
Walter H. Merriam,- 

wounded, flesh. 
George B. Paddock. 
Morris G. Painter, — 

wounded, flesh. 
Chauncey W. Roberts. 
Frederick A. Taylor. 
Alexander Ventres. 
Frank Williams. 
William Warner. 
Frank Taylor. 
John S. Warner. 
James Kellott. 



Company D. 

Privates, William IT. Lessey. 
Seeley Hall. 
John Kensella. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 155 

COMPANY F. 
Private, Joseph T. Palmer. 

Company G. 
Privates, Erastus S. Bacon. 
George L. Wells. 

Company H. 
Captain, John B. Dennis. 
2d Lieut., Henry II. Pierce. 

1st Sen/cant, Henry T. Braman, — wounded in arm, flesh. 
Sergeant, William P. Carroll. 
Corporals, Nicholas Walker, — wounded. 

Edward Sharp. 

William Smith. 
Privates, George Baker. Privates, John McKeon. 

Samuel Burdick. Michael Roach. 

Michael Grimes.. John Sullivan. 

Watson Good well. Daniel Shay. 

Thomas Henderson. Miles Shay. „ 

Joseph Harrington. William K. Thorpe. 

Henry Kimball. Levi A. Dowley. 

Company K. 
Privates, William Scranton. 
Edward Johnson. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted Men, - - - - 3 

Wounded, Commissioned Officers, 3 

Enlisted Men, - - - - 10 

Prisoners, Commissioned Officers, 4 

Enlisted Men, - - - - 74 

Wounded, Enlisted Men, 5 

Total, - - - 99 

THEODORE BACON, 

Capt. ComoVg 1th C. V. 



156 adjutant-general's report. 



Camp OF thi 7th Regiment, Conn. Vols.,) 
BERMUDA Hundred, Va., August 23rd, 1864. ) 

General: — 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken 
by the 7th Conn. Vols, in the late movement on the north side of 
the James River. 

The Regiment k ft camp about 11 o'clock on the night of the 13th 
of August, under the command of Capt Theodore Bacon, and was 
assigned to the position of left center of the four regiments comprising 
the 2nd Brigade. Capt. Bacon was taken sick on the night of the 
loth, thus leaving me in command of the regiment. 

The following officers were present for duty, viz. : Surgeon G. C 
Jarvis. Ass"! Surgeon E. C. Hine, Lieut. J. I. Hutchinson, Act'g Adj't» 
Lieut. W. H. Auger, Act'g R. Q. M., Capts. Bacon, Thompson and 
Perry, Lieuts. Wildman, Barker, Young, Bradford, Merriam, Lee and 
Taintor ; Lieuts. Hicks and Baldwin remaining in camp sick. 

1 ha A? to report that the Regiment proceeded with the rest of the 
Brigade, across the James River, and to a position about a mile and 
a half from the river where we lay concealed in the woods until day- 
light or after, and about 7 o'clock A. M. the Regiment was ordered 
to move forward in close column by company, along the road, as the 
enemy had been driven some distance from our front. In this order 
the Regiment was moved with the rest of the Brigade for about a 
mile, when we formed on the left of the Brigade in double column, 
closed in mass in an open field, and were ordered to lie down. 

Some of the enemy's sharp-shooters opened on us with some effect, 
and eight men were selected as sharp-shooters, and thrown forward 
and on our left Hank, to silence the enemy's fire, and Companies B, 
and G, under command of Lieut. Young, were also sent forward soon 
after for the same purpose. In this position we remained till about 
4 o'clock P. M. when the Regiment deployed in line of battle and 
marched by the right flank to the rear, for nearly a mile, on the same 
road that we had marched over in the morning, when we were halted, 
and lay in the woods until about 9 o'clock P. B£ and were exposed 
at times to the enemy's shells from a Battery in the woods in front of 
us. 

Our casualties in the fighting up to this time amounted to one 
killed, and five wounded. 

We then had orders to move with the Brigade, by the right flank, 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 157 

and marched about three or four miles, when we were ordered to halt 
and lie down for the night in line of battle, the Brigade being in 
column by battalion. 

On the morning of the 15th, after obtaining more ammunition, the 
march was resumed, and the Regiment moved by the right Hank with 
the Brigade, a distance of about four miles, when we were halted and 
ordered to lie down in line of battle, in an open field, the Brigade be- 
ing now in column by battalion. Here we were exposed to the fire from 
the enemy's Battery for some time, though but one casualty occurred 
during the day, and just before dusk, we were moved by the right 
flank about 800 yards and took our position for the night, in the edge 
of a piece of woods, or small scattering pines, and apparently about a 
thousand yards from the enemy's works. Directly in front of us was 
a corn field, and beyond that a deep ravine and mill pond, which sep- 
arated us from the enemy's main works. The following officers were 
present for duty at this time, viz : Ass't Surg. IJ. C. Hine, Lieut. J. I. 
Hutchinson, Act'g Adjt, Lieuts. Barker, Lee and Taintor. Captain 
Perry, Lieuts. Wildman, Young and Bradford, being sick, and unfit 
for duty, and Lieut. Gill had received a slight wound two days pre- 
vious, from which he had not recovered. Surgeon Jarvia was detached 
from the Regiment, being senior medical officer of the Brigade. 
Owing to the excessive heat, an unusual number of the enlisted men 
were compelled to fall out of the ranks while on the march, from sun- 
stroke, and excessive fatigue, being burdened with their knapsacks, so 
that on the morning of the 16th, they numbered but 161 men. 

I am sorry to report that some managed to straggle away from their 
command with no other object than to cowardly shirk their duty, but 
I think the number of this class is small. 

About 3 o'clock A. M. of the 16th, I received orders from Col. 
Hawley, Comd'g Brigade, to throw up some sort of protection in 
front of our line, as the enemy's sharpshooters were annoying us. I 
collected a quantity of rails, and soon had good protection from mus- 
ketry. 

About 8 o'clock A. M. I was ordered to move by the right flank, 
which was done in connection with the rest of the Brigade, and after 
marching about half a mile through the woods, we were halted. I 
soon after received orders to move forward with the Brigade in line 
of battle, in the direction of the enemy's works, and after moving 
about 700 yards through dense woods, and across a deep ravine, we 
were again halted. Here our line of battle was changed so as to 
conform with the enemy's works in front of us, and we were again 



158 adjutant-general's report. 

ordered forward about 400 yards, and ordered to lie down in line of 
bat;! 

CoL Ilawley informed bis whole Brigade, thai a Brigade in front 
of us was to charge the i works, and cautioned tbe whole 

command to remain firm, and in case the leading Brigade was repul- 
to allow them to pass ov< r Dfl to the rear, and then to hold our 
position at all hazards. The Brigade in front of us then rose up, 
and rushed forward through the woods, towards the enemy's works, 
when a gailing fire of musketry greet d us from the enemy. When 
they had d about fifty yard-. I heard Col. Ilawley give tho 

command M Forward second Brigade/ 1 when my regiment rose up in- 
stantly, and rushed forward at a double quick, cheering loudly, and 
following the leading Brigade in a good line of battle as the dense 
woods and the nature of the ground generally would permit. 

On arriving within about fifty yards of the work.-, we came upon a 
dashing of fallen tree^s, very difficult to pass, but through it we went 
with a will, and over the works, driving the enemy before us. On 
crossing the enemy's works, without halting, T moved the Regiment 
by the left flank, to avoid a dense thicket of young trees, in order to 
reach an open field about a hundred yards to the left. 

We then formed in line of battle, and moved forward across an 
open field about four hundred yards, and halted in the edge of a piece 
of woods, in order to guard against the approach of the enemy on 
our right flank. Other Regiments coming up to our support, a severe 
and general engagement with the enemy ensued. During the engage- 
ment, I perceived the enemy coming down through the woods, on 
my right Hank. I changed my line of battle accordingly, so as to 
front the enemy, and opened on them vigorously with the Spencer 
bines, and soon succeeded in driving them from before us. 

I soon received orders from Col. Ilawley, to fall back to the 
enemy's works, which we had passed over. Here I formed the Reg- 
iment in line of battle, frortting the enemy. I then received orders 
from General Terry to march my Regiment to the rear, oar ammu- 
nition being very nearly exhausted. 

Of the aiz officers, who were engaged in battle, four were either 
killed or wounded, and myself being very unwell from the effects of 
sunstroke a few days previous, turned over the command to Lieut, 
Taintor, the only remaining officer. 

Of every officer and enlisted man who participated in the engage- 
ment, I can only speak in terms of the most unqualified praise. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 159 

Every order was promptly and fearlessly obeyed, and I could neither 
ask or expect more of them. 

Lieut. Hutchinson was wounded and disabled during the assault on 
the enemy's works, while gallantly performing his duty, and compelled 
to retire. 

Lieut. Merriam had been wounded in the engagement of the 14th, 
but resumed his command, and was again wounded while nobly dis- 
charging his duty, and too much praise can not be awarded him. 

Lieuts. Parker and Lee, I regret to say, were wounded in the lat- 
ter part of the engagement, (supposed mortally,) and of necessity 
were left on the field to Ml into the hands of the enemy. They dis- 
played great coolness and courage throughout the entire engagement. 
Surgeon George C. Jarvis, and Asst. Surgeon E. C. Hine, were 
deserving of great praise for their efficient and untiring efforts in 
caring for the wounded of the command. 

The men displayed unusual zeal and bravery during the whole 
engagement, and where all Avho were with me have done so nobly, it 
is difficult to mention any particular individual as worthy of most 
praise. 

I will take the liberty, however, to give the names of Sergeant W. 
W. Plumb, Co. F, Acting Sergeant-Major, Sergeant Cook, Co. E, 
Sergeant H. H. Smith, Co. C, Sergeant B. Starr, Co. B, Sergeant 
Shailer, Co. I, Sergeant Whaples, Co. B, Sergeant Willard Austin, Co. 
G, 1st Sergeant Cook, Co. A, and Corporal Clark, Co. F. 

Appended is a list of casualties, from the 14th to the 16th, inclu- 
sive. 

I am, General, 

Very respectfully, 

Your Ob'd't Servant, 

JOHN THOMPSON, 

Captain Commanding Regiment, 
Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant-General State- of Connecticut, 
Hartford, Conn. 



160 adjutant-general's report. 

List of Casualties in the Seventh Regiment Conn. Vols., during En- 
gagements of August \Ath, \5th, lijth, ]~th, and 18*/*, 1864. 

K I L L E D . 

Company A. 
Corporal, George Castle, Aug. 16th. 
Private, John II. Couch, " loth. 

Company B. 

Sergeant, Walter W. Whaples, Aug. 14th. 

Company C. 
Privates, George B. Garrett, Aug. 16th. 
Charles P. Lewis, " " 

Company F 
Private, Samuel Woleott, Aug. 16th. 

Company H. 
Private, Stephen A. Wilcox, Aug. 16th. 

WOUNDED. 
Company A. 
Sergeant, Alfred Hatch, left leg, severely, Aug. 16th. 
Private, John C. Lewis, arm, " " " 

Company B. 
Private, Albert Clark, foot, slightly, Aug. 18th. 

Company C. 
Privates, Rollin Tennant, right foot, Aug. 16th. 

Lucius Vermilyea, right leg, slightly, Aug. 16th. 
Edwin Butler, right leg, severely, " " 

Amos Dickinson, left hand, slightly, " 17th. 

Company D. 

Sergeant, Wheeler J. Veats, abdomen, slightly, Aug. 14th. 

Privates, John Smith, left log. severely, « 16th. 

Orrin L. Scotield, right leg, severely, " u 
Alonzo Austin, left leg, " ■ " 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 161 

Company E. 
2d Lieut., E. J. Merriam, left leg, severely, Aug. 1 6th. 
Corporal, James E. Smith, right leg, " " 

Company F. 
Corporals, Edward W. Clark, face, severely, Aug. 16th. 

Benjamin Wooding, left arm, " " " 
Private, Henri Currie, leg, severely, " " 

Company G. 
1st Lieut., John I. Hutchinson, right wrist, slightly, Aug. 16th. 
2d Lieut., Henry B. Gill, right shoulder, " " 14th. 

Privates, Joel Gable, left leg, " " 

A. Dunn, both thighs, severely, " 16th. 

Company H. 
Sergeant, Timothy Dogan, right shoulder, Aug. 16th. 
Corporal, James Lamphere, left breast, severely, Aug. 16th. 
Privates, George A. Millard, left leg, 

John Zabroskie, right hip, 

Frank Gallagher, right hand slightly, 

Company I. 

Sergeants, Charles M. Shailer, right wrist and thigh, severely, 
Aug. 14th. 
Nicholas Van Deusen, shoulder, slightly, Aug. 16th. 
Private, Joseph Prarie, leg, slightly, Aug. 16th. 

Company K. 

1st Sergt., Gilbert Eaton, left shoulder, slightly, Aug. 16th. 
Corporal, Edward Lyon, right wrist, severely, " " 
Private, Stephen Greene, right arm, slightly, " 18th. 

MISSING. 
Company B. 
Private, Frederick Williams, Aug. 16th. 

Company C 
Private, Edmund Westerhood, Aug. 16fh. 

Company E. 
1st Lieut., Charles E. Barker, Aug. 16th. Wounded severely. 
11 « 



a 


ft 


u 


a 


a 


a 


ltlv 


a 


a 



162 adjutant-general's report. 

Company F. 

2d Lieut., Henry B. Lee, Aug. lGtli. Wounded, probably mortally. 
Private, Francis Schaler, " " 

Company G. 
Private, Henry Young, Aug. 16th. 

Company K. 
Corporal, William Britten, Aug. lGth. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted Men, - 7 

Wounded, Commissioned Officers, - -4 

Enlisted Men, 27 

Missing, Commissioned Officers, - - 2 

Enlisted Men, ... 5 

Total, ... 45 

JOHN THOMPSON, 
Captain 1th Conn. Vols., Coirid'g Regiment. 



Head-Quarters 7th Conn. Vols., ) 
In the Field, Laurel Hill, Va., Oct. 9th, 1864.) 
General : 

I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by 
the 7th Conn. Vols, in the recent engagements of Sept. 29th, Oct. 1st, 
and Oct. 7th. 

The regiment left camp before Petersburg on the afternoon of the 
28th of September, with the rest of the 2d Brigade, and bivouacked 
at Deep Bottom at about 2 o'clock A. M. of the 29th. At daybreak, 
the regiment, numbering 9 officers and 125 men, resumed the march, 
in connection with the rest of the Brigade, passing through our earth- 
works and in direction of the enemy for nearly a mile, when I re- 
ceived orders from Col. Abbott, Commanding Brigade, to deploy my 
regiment as skirmishers and advance towards the enemy's works. 
After passing an open field and through a deep ravine, through a 
'heavy fire from the enemy's batteries, together with musketry from 
;their sharp-shooters, we were ordered to halt, being about 800 yards 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 163 

from the enemy's works, and I ordered the men to lie down in line, 
so as to conceal them as much as possible from the view of the enemy's 
sharp-shooters. 

We lay in this position for about half an hour, and were ordered to 
advance, — the 3d New Hampshire Regiment having been ordered up 
to our support, — when I moved forward with my command, and en- 
tered their works without further resistance. 

Our loss in this skirmish was 1 commissioned officer and 7 enlisted 
men, wounded. 

After halting for about an hour we again resumed the march with 
the brigade towards Richmond, arriving at the second line of the ene- 
my's works about noon, and again halted. About 2 o'clock we 
marched with the brigade on a reconnoissance towards Richmond, but 
returned at nightfall without further fighting, to the enemy's second 
line of works, and bivouacked for the night. 

On the afternoon of Oct. 1st, we were marched over the same road 
towards Richmond, and were deployed as skirmishers with the rest of 
the brigade, and ordered to advance on the enemy's line of works. 
In doing so it was necessary to cross an almost impassable ravine, in 
the face of a terrible fire from the enemy's batteries ; but notwith- 
standing the difficulties, the line moved on in good order for a dis- 
tance of about three-quarters of a mile, when we were halted, within 
about 600 yards of their works, and soon ordered to fall back, when 
we retreated slowly and in good order, the enemy still firing upon us 
from their batteries until we were out of range of their guns. We 
arrived at the place from whence we started, at 10 P. M., and 
bivouacked for the night. 

Our loss in this skirmish was 1 killed, 4 wounded, and 10 missing. 
On the morning of the 7th, my regiment was ordered out of our en- 
trenched position that we had occupied for four days on the right 
flank of our works, to move with the rest of the brigade, to a position 
further to the right and rear, in order to check the advance of the 
enemy, who had made a vigorous attack on the Cavalry in front of 
us, and driven them in. After getting into our position in the brig- 
ade, and in line of battle, I was ordered to send fifty men forward as 
skirmishers, which I placed under command of Capt. Thomgion. 
Soon after, I was ordered to send twenty-five more, but before they 
had time to deploy, the enemy advanced in force, and I immediately 
opened fire upon them, directing my line of fire to the front and right 
and left oblique, as the enemy showed themselves to be in strongest 
force, and they were soon repulsed. Our loss in this engagement waa 



164 adjutant-general's report. 

1 killed, 13 wounded, and 1 missing. The behavior of both officers 
and men in this engagement irafl perfectly satisfactory. 

All orders were promptly and cheerfully obeyed, and where all have 
done so nobly, it is difficult to mention any as especially worthy of 
honorable mention. 

I have the honor to be 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

S. S. ATWELL, 

Capt. ComtTg 1th Conn. Vols. 

Brig.-Gen'l H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut, 

Hartford, Conn. 

.» 

l/ist of Casualties in the Seventh Regiment Co?in. Vols, from the 29M 
day of Sept., to the $th day of Oct., inclusive. 

KILLED. 

Company A. 
Sergeant, Clinton Lucas, Oct. 7th. 

Company H. 
Private, William Kiernan, Oct. 1st. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
Private, Griswold P. Miller, Oct. 7th. 

Company B. 

Corporal, Benjamin Robinson, Sept 29th. 
Private, Edward Harper, Oct. 7th. 

Company C 
Sergeant, Daniel P. Johnson, Sept. 29th. 
Privates, Henry Slater, " 29th. 

John W. Gallagher, Oct. 1st. 

Company D. 
Co rporah, George Webb, Oct. 1st. 
Henry Williams, " 7th. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 165 



Company E. 
Corporals, Henry Williams, Sept. 29th. 

George Bellows, Oct. 7th. 
Privates, Charles Spencer, Sept. 29th. 

Burton Hart, Oct. 7th. 

Company F. 
1st Lieut.,J6hn B. Young, Sept. 29th. 
Private, Thomas Mulvey, Oct. 7th. 

Company H. 
Private, David Saunders, Oct. 7th. 

Company I. 
Privates, George Briggs, Sept. 29th. 
N. Stevens, Oct. 1st. 
E. Couch, '" 7th. 

C. Bonville, " 7th. 

MISSING. 
• Company A. 

Privates, John Gagion, Oct. 7th. 
Andrew Stewart, " 1st. 

Company C. 
Privates, Burton W. Goodnough, Oct. 1st. 
Edward Crandall, " 1st. 

Company D. 
Private, Edwin Chase, Oct. 1st. 

Company F. 
Private, Frank Williams, Oct. 1st. 

Company G. 

Privates, John Botsford, Oct. 1st. 

John H. Booth, " 1st. 

George W. Banning, " 1st. 

John Dowd, " 1st. 

Company H. 
Sergeant, Albert Kinney, Oct. 7th. 
Corporal, William G.Wood, " 7th. 



I adjutant-general's report. 

Privates, Morris Wilcox, S.pt. 29th. 
Theodore Bradley, Oct. 7th. 

Company I. 
Privates, John Smith, Oct. lsf. 
Pat Collins. 

* Company K. 

Corporal, Michael Clinton, Oct. 7th. 

S. S. AT\yELL, 

Capt. ConuVg 1th C. V. 



Head-Quarters 7th Conn. Vols. \ 
Near Fort Fisher, N. C , Jan. 17th, 1865. ) 

Brig.-Gen'l H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 

General : 

I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by 
my command in the attack on Fort Fisher, on the night of the 15th 
inst. 

In pursuance of orders received from Col. J. C. Abbott, command- 
ing Brigade, the regiment moved from its present position at 4.30 
P. M., and marching towards Fort Fisher, reached the outer line of 
works at about 5.30 P. M. From this point we advanced under a 
light fire of artillery and infantry, reaching the Fort with a loss of 
but one man severely wounded. At this point I received a wound 
in the left foot, which incapacitated me for further duty, and I trans- 
ferred the command of the regiment to Capt. Wm. S. Marble. 

I have the honor to be, General, 

Very respectfully your ob't servant, 
JOHN THOMPSON, 

Capt. 1th Regt. Conn. Vols. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 167 



Head-Quarters 7th Reg't Conn. Vols., 
Near Fort Fisher, N. C, Jan. 17th, 18G5. 



Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 
General : 

I have the honor to transmit the following report of the part taken 
by this regiment, after I assumed command, which I did immediately 
upon Capt. Thompson's being wounded. 

Reporting to Colonel Abbott, I received orders to march the regi- 
ment into a covered way, leading from near the sally port, towards 
the center of the fort. Here we were supplied with shovels and 
ordered to move forward thirty paces and deploy in a line ex- 
tending from the eighth traverse to the river, and nearly at right 
angle with the line of traverses. 

We were deployed in groups of three, with orders to dig pits for 
our protection from the fire of the enemy, which at this time was 
quite annoying. 

Owing to the lack of shovels, many of the men were obliged to lie 
without protection for some time, and before the work was completed 
we had suffered a loss of one killed and four wounded, from the fire 
of the fleet, which dropped many shells amongst us. 

1[n consequence of a rise of ground in front of the right wing, they 
were unable to fire, but the left wing engaged the enemy vigorously, 
driving them from two traverses, which advantage they were unable 
to follow up, as an advance would have necessitated an extension of 
our line. 

From this time we continued our fire, under cover of which an 
advance was made by other portions of the brigade, who drove the 
enemy into their bomb proofs, when seeing the last traverse cleared 
we ceased firing. 

In accordance with instructions received from Captain Caryl, In- 
spector General on Colonel Abbott's staff, we remained in this posi- 
tion until 2 A. M., when we were ordered to bring up the rear of a 
column of prisoners. 

Upon arriving near the Head-Quarters of the Brevet Major-Gen- 
eral Commanding, we were dismissed by the Brigade Commander, 
and marched to the position occupied by the regiment the previous 
day. 

I inclose a list of casualties which occurred in the regiment during 
this engagement. 



168 adjutant-general's report. 

The regiment left camp with eight commissioned officers and sev- 
enty-five enlisted men. 

I have the honor to be, General, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

WM. S. MARBLE, 

Capt. 1th Jieg't Conn. Vol*. 
Official, 

A. M. Holden, 

1st Lieut, and Adjutant. 

List of Casualties occurring in the 1th Regiment Connecticut J'olun- 
teers, in engagement of Jan. loth, 18G5, at Fort Fisher, N. C. 

KILLED. 

Company E. 
Private, James Lynch. 

WOUNDED. 

Captain, John Thompson, Comd'g Reg't, — left foot, slight. 

Company A. 
Corporal, John O. Bery, — right arm, severe. 

Company D. 
1st Sergeant, Chas. A. Benger, — right thigh, mortal. (Since died.) • 
Private, James Ballard, — head, slight. 

Company I. 
Sergeant, John J. Corcoran, — head, slight. 

Company K. 
Sergeant, Albert Winegar, — hand, slight. 

WM. S. MARBLE, 

Capt. 1th Conn. Vols., ComoVg Reg't. 
Official, 

A. M. Holden, 

1st Lieut, and Adjutant. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 169 



Head-Quarters, 7th Reg. Conn. Vols., 
Near Fort Fisher, N. C, Jan. 20th, 1865. 



Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 
General : 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken 
by my command, in a reconnoissance made on the 19th of January, 
1865. 

In obedience to orders received from Brevet Brigadier General 
Abbott, Commanding the Brigade, at 11 o'clock a detachment of the 
regiment, (numbering four commissioned officers and thirty-seven en- 
listed men,) moved from its position to the head of Myrtle Sound. 
From there the regiment advanced as skirmishers to the rear of the 
" Half Moon Battery," and were fired upon by a party of the enemy, 
numbering about seventy-five men, strongly entrenched. Here the com- 
mand was obliged to halt, owing to the severity of the fire from the 
rebels, until another portion of the brigade was sent in upon the right 
flank of the work. 

Seeing it surrounded, the command charged upon the enemy, cap- 
turing two officers and fifty-four men. 

After halting here for some time, I sent forward, by General 
Abbott's direction, 1st Lieutenant Willard Austin, and twelve men, 
with orders to draw the fire of the enemy, who were posted behind a 
strong line of works about one-fourth of a mile in our immediate 
front. 

Lieut. Austin advanced his skirmishers to the edge of a swamp, 
and within about one hundred yards of the rebel works, but although 
He ascertained their position, he was unable to fully develop their fire. 

While on the skirmish line, Lieut. Austin was slightly wounded in 
the right shoulder by a shell from one of our gunboats. Remaining 
in this position until dark, we received orders from General Abbott 
to withdraw our skirmishers and return to camp, which we reached 
at 7 o'clock P. M. 

I take pleasure in commending to your favorable notice, Adjutant 
Albert M. Holden, who performed his duties on this trying occasion 
with marked ability and courage. 

Adjutant Holden is a young officer of much promise, and deserves 
honorable mention for gallant and meritorious conduct in this as well 
as previous engagements. 



170 



adjutant-general's report. 



Justice to the deserving lead- me to also commend the action of 1st 

Lieutenant Willard Austin of my command, who performed with 

Ltesl acceptance a most difficult and dangerous duty, being 

Instructed by General Abbott to advance with a detachment of men 

considerably beyond our main line, in order to draw the enemy's tire. 
I enclose a list of casualties with this report. 
I have the honor to be, General, 
Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN THOMPSON, 
Captain 7th Conn. Vols., Comd'g Regt. 



List of Casualties in the 1th Regiment Conn. Vols.. January 19M, 

1865. 



WOUNDED. 

1st Lieut., Willard Austin, right shoulder, shell, slight. 

Company D. 

Private, S. Woodbury, right breast, gunshot, slight. 

Company II. 
Private, C. Holmes, right breast and arm, gunshot, severe. 



Private, Jas. Louden. 



Private, George Wickes. 



MISSING. 
Company C. 

Company F. 

JOHN THOMPSON, 
Captain 1th Conn. Vols., Comd'g Regt. 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY 



171 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 



Rank and Name. 

Colonel. 
John E. Ward, 

Lieut. -Colonel. 
Martin B. Smith, 

M< i jors. 
William M. Pratt, 
Charles M. Coit, 

Adjutant. 
William M. Pratt, 
Quartermaster. 
Wm. M. Dougherty. 

Chaplain. 
Moses Smith, 

Surgeons. 
James A. Bigelow, 
Melancthon Storrs, 
1st Assist. Surgeons. 
Sabin Stocking, 
James A. Bigelow, 
2c? Assist. Surgeons. 
Theo. E. Hamilton 
James A. Bigelow, 

Captains. 
James R. Moore, 
Thos D. Sheffield, 
Andrew M. Morgan, 
Geo. C. Merriam, 
E. Emmons Graves, 
Charles M. Coit, 
Roger M. Ford, 
Henry M. Hoyt, 
Wm.'j. Roberts, 
Henry C. Hall, 
John MeCall, 
Roger M. Ford, 
Elam T. Goodrich, 

1st Lieutenants. 
Sidney B. DeKay, 
John L. Merriam, 
Geo. W. Farnham, 
Henry P. Johnson, 
Thomas S. Weed, 
Noah P. Ives, 
Andrew M. Morgan, 
Alfred M. Goddard, 
John A. Rathbun, 
Levi C. Bingham, 
John S. Lane, 
William M. Pratt, 
Marcus L. Pelham, 




Date of 
Commission. 



Remarks. 



April 2, 1863 Must'd out of service Mch. 14, 1865. 
April 6, 1863 Must'd out, Dec. 20, 1864 ; term ex. 



Meriden, 

Newport, R.I 

Plainville, 

No. Canaan, 
.Colchester, 

I 

iGlastenbury, 
iNo. Canaan, 

! 

Somers, 
jNo. Canaan, 



Nov. 1,1864 
Oct. 12,1864 

May 29, 1863 

Jan. 8, 1863 

Dec. 1,1863 



Nov. 
Oct. 



1, 1864 
4, 1861 



Declined commission, 



\ 



Promoted Major Nov. 1, 1864. 
Mustered out ; term expired. 

Must'd out Oct. 9, 1864 ; term ex'd. 



Norwich, 

jStonington, 

Stonington, 

Meriden, 

,Thompson, 

j Norwich, 

New Haven, 

(Bridgeport, 

INewMilford, 

(Newtown, 

I Norwich, 

Meriden, 

Meriden, 



Aug. 29, 1862;Prom. Surg. 17th C V. Apr. 18, '64. 
June 2, 1864i " " Nov. 1, 1864. 



June 2, 1864 
Aug. 15,1862 



Mch. 

June 

July 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Mch. 

Feb. 

Dec. 

Mav 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan. 



New Haven, May 
|Meriden, IJuly 

Durham, Dec. 

New Haven, ! Mch. 
So. Norwalk, Feb 
Meriden, J Aug. 
Stonington, !Nov. 
Norwich, July 

Mystic River, Oct. 
Meriden, Oct. 

Milford, July 

Meriden, [July 
Stamford, iAug. 



28. 
24, 
17, 
5, 
26, 
27, 
15, 
25, 

5, 

24, 
23, 
15, 
17, 

16, 

17, 
22, 

2, 
22, 
15, 
17, 
24, 

1, 

17* 

17. 
2, 



Prom. 1st Ass't Surg. June 2, 1864. 



1862 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1862J 
1865; 

1861 Clustered out ; term expired. 

1862 Discharged, disabilitv, Jan. 31, 1865. 

1862 Killed in action July 11, 1864. 
1862| " " " May 16, 1864. 
1863, Hon. discharged Sept 2, 1864. 

1863 Must'd out Nov. 26, 1864 ; term ex. 

1864 

1864 

1864 

1865 

1862 Must'd out Oct. 14, 1864; term ex. 

1862|Disc'd for promotion Sept. 16, 1864. 

1862 Promoted Captain Jul v 17, 1864. 
1863j Died of wounds May, 1*864. 

1863 Must'd out Dec. 7," 1864; term ex. 

1863 Killed in action May 9, 1864. 

1864 Commission revoked Aug. 3, 1864. 
1864 " " Aug 3, 1864. 
1864iDishon. dismissed, Dec. £-j, 1864. 



172 



ADJUTANT -GENERAL'S REPORT 



Eighth Regiment Infantry — Continued. 



Rank and Name. 

1st I. it ut, Hants. 

James B. Kill»ournc : 
Samuel S. Foss, 
2d Lieut, nants. 
Amos L. Keables, 
George If. Stevens, 
Seth G. Plumb, 
Antho. R. Cantield, 
Jolin H. Vorra, 
John L. Merriam, 
John L. Lane, 
Erwin D. Hall, 
Charles X. Irwin, 
Samuel S. Foss, 
Alcanzor O. VVells, 
James B. Kilbourn, 



Residence. 



Hartford, 
Norwich, 

Norwich, 
Deep River, 
So. Windsor, 

[So. Norwalk, 
Hartford, 
Meriden, 
Milford, 
Mew Britain, 
New Milford, 
Norwich, 
Myotic River, 
Hartford, 



Date of 
Commission. 



Remarks. 



Aug. 3, 1864 Died Sept 29, 1864. 

Au-. 2, 1864 Must, out Jan. 27, 18G3 ; term ex. 

An-. 1,1 

Oct. 1, 1863 Must'd out ; term expired, [w> 2d Lt. 
, -Inlv 17, 1 864 Killed in action Sept 29, "64, nerer must. 

Nov. 7, l 862 Hon. discharged, July 30, 1864. 
July 24, 1863 Mustered out Feb. if, 1865. 
Oct. 1, 1863 Promoted 1st Lieut July 17, 1864. 
Sept. 29, 1863 Must'd out Oct 14, 1864 ; term ex. 
Oct. 6, 1863 Honorably discharged, Oct. 3, 1864. 
, Oct. 29, 1863 Died Sept. 29, 1864. 
Jan. 8, 1863 Promoted 1st Lieut. Aug. 2, 1864. 
Mch. 22, 1864 Discharged Oct. 24, 1864. 
July 17, 1864 Promoted 1st Lieut. Aug. 2, 1864. 



Camp 8th Regiment Conn. Vol. Infantry, \ 
2d Brigade, 3d Division, 24th A. C, >- 
Near Richmond, Va., March 1st, 1865. ) 
Brig. Gen. Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General, State of Connecticut, — 
General : 

In accordance with your request, I have the honor to forward the fol- 
lowing brief sketch of the history of the 8th Regiment during the last 
year. Having been on detached service most of the time, I am unable 
to speak to any extent from personal observation, but depend upon the 
records of the regiment. 

The re-enlisted veterans of the 8th returned from their veteran fur- 
lough to the old camp near Portsmouth, Va., March 1st, 1864. March 
13th, 1864, the regiment was ordered to Deep Creek, Va., where it 
remained, performing outpost and picket duty, until April 13th, when it 
shared in the reconnoissance toward Suffolk, Va., returning the 14th. On 
the 19th, broke camp at Deep Creek, marched to Portsmouth, embarked 
for Newport News, and began the march toward Yorktown, Va. ; arrived 
there on the 21st, and went into camp. 

"While at Yorktown, the 8th was assigned to the 2d Brigade, 1st Divis- 
ion, 18th Army Corps, and the time was occupied in reorganization and 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 173 

drill. In connection with other troops, this regiment broke camp at 
Yorktovvn, May 4th, and embarking, proceeded on the then unknown 
expedition commanded by Major-General Butler. The regiment dis- 
embarked on the evening of the 5th, at Bermuda Hundred, Va., biv- 
ouacked for the night, and marched at daylight the next morning. 
The position of the famous line of fortifications between the James 
and Appomattox rivers was reached at noon, and digging commenced 
that day. On the morning of May 7th, a reconnoissance in force was 
executed, the 8th as skirmishers leading the advance. During the 
afternoon the enemy's skirmishers were constantly driven, until their 
force was found to be posted upon the Richmond and Petersburg Rail- 
road, near "Walthall Junction. The regiment here formed in line of 
battle, and repeatedly drove the enemy. They, however, as repeat- 
edly re-formed behind an embankment, and were not dislodged, but 
confessed to heavy losses, and at night retired from the.position. The 
8th, in this line, was in an open field, exposed to field pieces as well 
as musketry; it, however, stood firm until ammunition being ex- 
hausted it was relieved by order. The regiment was complimented 
by its Brigade Commander, the lamented General Burnham, for 
heroism that day ; and as it returned from the field, was cheered by 
the whole Brigade. 

It earned its laurels dearly. 1st Lieuts. Bingham, Co. G, and 
Goddard, Co. B, were both mortally wounded ; Col. John E. Ward 
was severely bruised by a shell ; Capt. James R. Moore, Co. D, was 
disabled for life ; 2d Lieut. John H. Vorra, Co. K, was severely 
wounded ; and the total number of casualties amounted to seventy- 
two, (72,) of which, list has already been forwarded. 

One day's rest, and again, May 9th and 10th, the regiment formed 
part of the skirmish line in the further reconnoissance towards Peters- 
burg, on the north side. Only three casualties, however, were expe- 
rienced. 

Again, after a single day's rest, the regiment moved in the advance 
towards Drury's Bluff. For four successive days and nights the 
whole regiment was constantly at the front as skirmishers, or in line ; 
through rain and mud the force pushed on, and each day added to the 
list of dead and wounded. 

The outer line of the enemy's works was carried on the morning of 
the 14th, when 2d Lieut. Hall, Co. C, was severely wounded and dis- 
abled for life. 

The morning fog of May 16th, and the repulse suffered by the 18th 
Army Corps, are historic. 



174 A D J U T A N T - G E N E It A L ' S REPORT. 

The 8th held a mosl precarious position at an angle of the line, and 
wm Banked on both sides in falling hack. Capt McCall, Co. K, fell 
by a hullct that pierced his heart Capt. Hall, Co. F, was ixho 
wounded. 

A n*are detailed report, and a complete list of casualties were for- 
warded at that time. 

Gladly did the regiment retire within the fortifications that night; 
for eight days out of ten it had been in front, and its lo— es had 
amounted to 140, or nearly one-third of its whole fighting .-trength. 

A week of hard labor upon the fortifications followed, and then the 
Cold Harbor expedition, consisting of the 18th A. C, and one Divis- 
ion of the 10th A. C, all commanded by Major-General Wm. F. 
Smith. 

The Eighth was uncomfortably packed upon a leaky old barge on 
the morning of May 29th, at Bermuda Landing, Va., but was allowed 
to leave it on the evening of the 30th, and bivouacked at White House, 
Va. 

The report of operations from this date to 10th of June, covering 
the battle of Cold Harbor, was at the time forwarded by Capt. Coit, 
commanding. 

The regiment on the 12th marched to the "White House." The 
next morning it went on board the steamer "Ocean Wave,*' and landed 
the following afternoon at Point of Rocks. Va. 

The regiment marched to the old camping-ground left May 28th, 
but was again on the march at 3 o'clock the following morning, June 
loth, crossing to the south side of the Appomattox. See report of 
Capt. Coit, heretofore forwarded, concerning movements of loth to 
17th, inclusive. 

June 21st, the regiment marched back in front of Petersburg, 
entered the trenches and shared in the monotonous siege work until 
August 27th, suffering in the mean time twenty-eight ('IS) casualties, 
among them the death of Capt. II. C. Hall, Co. F, and the wounding 
of Capts. E. T. Goodrich, Co. H, and Roger M. Ford, Co. G. 

On the 10th of Augu>t, lit'ty-six recruits had reported to the regi- 
ment, and from the 27th of that month until the 28th of September, the 
regiment lay encamped on the south side of the James River, behind 
the fortifications, picketing a portion of the " Bermuda Hundred front," 
and at the same time drilling and preparing for further work. A 
squad of men sent out to set telegraph poles, were surprised by the 
enemy on the famous cattle raid, Sept. 19th, and nineteen (19) were 
captured. 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 175 

With the evening of Sept. 28th, another march began, the James 
was crossed, and at dawn, Sept. 29th, our columns advanced towards 
" Battery Harrison." The 8th furnished two companies for skirmish- 
ers, while the remainder of the regiment headed the storming col- 
umn. 

For that morning's work too much praise can not be bestowed. 
New men vied with veterans, and every man did his duty. They 
charged over nearly a mile of open field, and at 8 o'clock the field 
was won. Both Color Sergeants, Wm. Simmons, Co. F, and Jacob 
Bishop, Co. H, received commissions for meritorious daring, and Ser- 
geant Hickok, Co. A, the choice of a commission or thirty days' fur- 
lough, the latter of which he accepted, although in subsequent action, 
before receiving his furlough, he was wounded and fell into the hands 
of the enemy. The brave heroism of that day told severely upon 
both officers and men. The killed and wounded numbered sixty-four; 
eight of these were commissioned officers. Among the wounded were 
Lieut. Col. M. B. Smith, commanding the Regiment, 1st Lieut. Sam- 
uel S. Foss, Acting Adjutant, Capt. Wm. J. Roberts, Co. I, 1st Lieut. 
John A. Rathburn, Co. E, 2d Lieut. Amos L. Keables, Co. D, all of 
whom have been unfitted for service on account of these wounds, and 
with the exception of Lieut. Keables, who has not yet sufficiently 
recovered to leave the hospital, have already been discharged. 

Among the lamented dead were Lieut. Charles N. Irwin, whose term 
of service had expired^ but who would not ask exemption from danger, 
1st Lie^ut James B. Kilboume, and Serg't Seth F. Plumb, Co. E, who 
had been eommissioned but not mustered. 

"Battery Harrison" was too valuable a position to the rebels to be 
cheerfully surrendered. They attempted to recover the fort, but 
were terribly repulsed. The 8th suffered in these attempts eleven 
casualties. The regiment lay in the trenches within and near the 
fort, four weeks. Fatigue duty, watching, picketing, storms and lack 
. of even shelter tents, which then were not allowed at the front, swel- 
led the sick list, so that on the morning of October 24th, the Regiment 
bore but ninety (90) muskets. That day the Regiment was relieved 
from the front, and assigned to guard duty at Head-Quarters 18th 
Army Corps; at this time, Capt. Charles M. Coit, Co. B, who had 
commanded the Regiment through all the movements at Cold Harbor, 
the successful charge before Petersburg, and the long siege work fol- 
lowing, was Actg. Asst. Adj't Gcn'l 2d Brig. 3d Div. 18th Army 
Corps, which position he retained after the Regiment was relieved from 
the Brigade. In the demonstration at Fair Oaks, Va., October 28th, 



176 adjutant-general's report. 

18G4, he wu scwn-ly wounded in the cheet, and has not yet been 
able to leave the Hospital. 

On the 29th of November, ninety (90) recruits reported to the 
Regiment. 

In the reorganization of the 10th and 18th Army Corps, the Reg- 
iment was retained on guard duty at Head-' 24th Army Corps, 
to which post the Regiment moved December 4th, 1864; in this con- 
dition it remained until February 5th, 1865, when it was relieved 
from guard duty and assigned to a Brigade (2d Brig. 3d Div. 24th 
A. C) commanded by our own Colonel John E. Ward. 

The casualties in action during the year, a li-l of which I enclose, 
have been over three hundred, twenty of which were Commissioned 
Officers. 

I have said little of the virtues and bravery of those noble officers 
and men of the Regiment, who have sacrificed their lives for their 
country, or have been disabled in the service. Their virtues are ap- 
preciated by their friends at home, and tenderly treasured in the 
memory of their comrades. Their bravery was so perfect, so uni- 
versal, and so well known, that it requires no comment. 

I am, General, 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

WILLIAM M. PRATT, 

Major ComcTg 8th Conn. Vols. 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 177 

Head-Quarters 8th Keg't Conn. Vols., ) 
In the Field, May 8th, 1864. ) 
Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 
General : 

I have the honor to forward herewith Report of Casualties in the 
8th Keg't Conn. Vols., in the engagement near the Richmond and 
Petersburg Railroad, about five miles from Petersburg, on the 7th 
day of May, 1864. 

Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. EDWARD WARD, 

Col. ComoVg 8th Conn. Vols. 

List of Casualties in 8th Conn. Vols., May 7th, 1864. 

KILLED. 

Company C. 
Private, Carl F. Lenthard. 

Company E. 
Privates, Lawrence Riley. 
Franklin M. Rose. 

WOUNDED. 

Serg't Major, Forrest SpofFord, arm, very slightly. 

Company A. 
Privates, Darius E. Malona, abdomen, seriously. 
John Ebi, mouth. 

John L. Herchgresser, arm, slightly. 
Richard Brady, leg, slightly. 
John Doyle, breast, slightly. 

Company B. 
1st Lieut., Alfred M. Goddard, abdomen, seriously. 
Privates, John Child, lungs, (since died.) 
William Wright, lost left leg. 
James Davidson, head, mortally, (since died.) 
12 



178 adjutant-general's report 



Company C. 

Sergeants, Elias J. Bidwell, face, slightly. 

Thomas J. Hubbard, arm, seriously. 
Corporals, Samuel B. Hart, hand, slightly. 

Edward Carpenter, arm, slightly. 
Privates, James Ashby, side, slightly. 

Alphonse Bauza, side, seriously. 
Lucius Clark, side and arm, slightly. 

Company D. 
1st Sergeant, William Huntington, le& slightly. 
Corporals, Stephen B. Huling, head, seriously. 

Edgar A. Loekwood, thigh, seriously. 
Privates, John Martin, lost right leg. 

James Welsh, head and side, seriously. 

Company E. 
Sergeant, Silas P. Keeler, head, seriously. 
Corporals, Jerome Evans, shoulder, slightly. 

Roger W. Cook, arm, slightly. 
Privates, Philo D. Hotchkiss, lost left arm. 
Horace Garrigus, head, slightly. 

Company F. 
2nd Lieut. Anthony R. Canfield, leg, slightly. 
Sergeant, Albert Austin, lost thumb. 
Corporal, Charles Thompson, foot, slightly. 
Privates, George Astmas, lost leg. 

Richard Ambrose, lost leg. 

George Beach, thigh, slightly. 

Josiah Parkerson, arm and breast mortally, (since died ) 

John H. M. Smith, leg, seriously. 

Frederick Smith, breast, seriously. 

Allen Dauchy, ankle, seriously. 

Company G. 
1st Lieut. Levi C. Bingham, arm, seriously. 
Sergeant, George W. Foster, side and arm, seriously 
Privates, Isaac Allen, foot, slightly. 

Henry Brannan, leg and side, seriously. 

Courtland A. Durfee, hip, seriously. 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 179 

Privates, Charles W. Hall, leg, slightly. 
Cornelius O'Connor, lost leg. 
Patrick Donovan, leg, slightly. 

Company H. 
Corporal, Charles H. Hill, neck, slightly. 
Privates, Charles Doulans, back, seriously. 

Emil Fischer, shoulder, slightly. 

John Morris, ankle, slightly. 

John Thomas, head, slightly. 

Company L 
Privates, William Black, hip, seriously. 

William P. Dutcher, leg, slightly. 
Henry Root, leg, slightly. 
Richard J. Worden, back, mortally. 
Daniel McKinnon, shoulder, slightly. 
Levi Cook, thigh, slightly. 

Company K. 
2d Lieut., John H. Vorra, hand, slightly. 
Sergeant, Wallace S. Cloude, shoulder, slightly. 
Privates, Benjamin Beebe, arm, slightly. 

Wm. E. Dudley, thigh, slightly. 

Lewis Allen, thigh, slightly. 

MISSING. 

Company D. 

Privates, Edward Bromley. 
John Carroll. 
Nelson M. Sammiss. 

Company G. 
Private, Elias W. Watrous. 

Company H. 
Privates, George H. Bennett. 
John Kenny. 
Barlow Marshall. 

Company K. 
Private, Augustus Fry. 



180 adjutant-general's report. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted Men, - - - 3 

Wounded, Cominis<ion«'d Offi< - - 4 

Enlisted Men, - - - - 57 

Missing, Enlisted Men, ... 8 

Total, - - - - 72 



Head-Quarters 8tii Reg't Conn. Vols., } 
In the Field, May 17, 1864. | 

Brig. Gen. Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 
General : 

I have the honor to forward herewith the report of casualties in 
the 8th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, in the operations near 
Fort Darling, Va., from May 12th to May 16th, 1864, inclusive. 
Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

M. B. SMITH, 
Lt. Col. ComoVg 8th Reg't Conn. Vols. 

List of Casualties in the 8th Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, in the 
operations approaching Fort Darling, from the 12th to the 16th of 
Mag, 1864, inclusive. 

KILLED. 

Company C. 

.Privates, Henry Randall. 
Charles Jones. 

Company E. 
1st Sergeant, Edward Wadhams. 

Company G. 
Privates, Ebenezer Rose, Jr. 
Dennis Geary. 

Company I. 

-Private, Albert Clark. 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 181 

Company K. 
Captain, John McCall. 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 

Privates, John Gates, mouth, severely. 
Juan Hernandez, leg, slightly. 
George C. Root, arm, severely. 
John Burns, foot, slightly. 

Company B. 
Sergeant, William Dixon, hip, severely. 

Company C 
Privates, Henry Clark, head, slightly. 
Wm. J. Chadsey, leg, slightly. 
David D. Hamill, shoulder, severely. 

Company D. 
Sergeant, Henry D. Rose, hip, severely. 
Privates, John Morey, breast, severely. 

Wm. C. McCall, face and lungs, severely. 

Wm. H. Nichols, back, mortally. 

Adam Rose, hand, slightly. 

William F. Wagner, hand, slightly. 

William Watts, hip, severely. 

Company F. 
Captain, Henry C. Hall, head, severely. 
Privates, Allen Dauchey, foot, severely. 

John Hern, thigh, slightly. 

Edgar Tillotson, both thighs, severely. 

Company G. 
Privates, Thomas W. Ryan, hip, severely. 
Charles Baird, leg, severely. 

Company H. 
Corporal, A. S. Wallace, leg, slightly. 
Privates, Francis Waterbury, shoulder, severely. 
William G. Crockett, arm, severely. 



182 adjutant-general's report. 

Company I. 
2nd Lieut., Edwin D. Hall, left arm, severely. 
Privates, David Palmer, shoulder, slightly. 
Michael Daily, shoulder, slightly. 

Company K. 
Corporal, C. W. Allen, shoulder, severely. 
Privates, J. "Walker, thigh, severely. 

Sylvanus Brinton, head, slightly. 

MISSING. 

Company B. 
Privates, John I. Phillips. 

Charles F. Selden. 

Company C. 
P?*ivates. Edward Morrison. Privates, James Biraey. 

John Pierce. John "W. Thompson. 

Louis Math. 

Company D. 
Private, John Higgins. 

Company E. 
Privates, Josiah Lewis. 

Thomas Scotton. 

Company F. 
Corporal, Frederick Stanton. 
Privates, Benjamin Hall. 
John O'Neil. 

Company G. 
Is? Sergeant, Henry G. Knowles. Privates, Nehemiah D. Tinker. 
Corporals, Oliver A. Eccleston. Benjamin Crossly. 

Charles J. Edwards. Alfred Dickson. 

Company H. 
Corporal, John Harkins. Privates, Leander Marshall. 

Privates, John Doran. Hawley Williams. 

Sylvester Godfrey. 

Company I. 

Privates, James Riley. 

Michael Handley. 



183 



E I G H T § REGIMENT INFANTRY. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Commissioned Officers, 1 

Enlisted Men, - - - 6 

Wounded, Commissioned Officers, 2 

Enlisted Men, - - - 28 

Missing, Enlisted Men, - - -26 

Total, - - - 63 

M. B. SMITH, 

Lieut. Col. Comctg Stk Conn. Vols. 



Head-Quarters 8th Regiment Conn. Vols., \ 
Near Petersburg, Va., May 18th, 1864. ) 
Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 
General : 

I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of 
my regiment in the recent engagements with the enemy from the 6th 
to the 16th inst. 

The regiment left camp at daybreak on the morning of the 7th, 
was ordered to the front as skirmishers during the morning, drove the 
enemy from a strong position in the woods, and then advanced in line 
of battle and engaged the enemy, who were strongly posted behind 
the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad embankment, until ordered 
to fall back for want of ammunition. We returned to camp that 
night, the loss being four killed, sixty-one wounded, and seven miss- 
ing. Among the wounded were four commissioned officers. 

The regiment again left camp on the morning of the 9th. During 
the day the two flank companies were engaged as skirmishers. The 
regiment during the morning was held as reserve for the brigade on 
their advance towards Petersburg. About noon the regiment was 
ordered into a position on the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad by 
General Brooks ; this position we held until nightfall, in the meantime 
having destroyed a portion of the railroad. At six o'clock P. M. we 
were ordered to form in line of battle on the right of the brigade line. 
This position we held until the afternoon of the 10th, when we were 
withdrawn to a position under cover of the woods, which we held until 
the withdrawal of the pickets, our loss being one killed and two 



184 adjutant-general's report. 

wounded, — all enlisted men. We returned to camp on the afternoon 
of the loth. 

On the morning of the 12th, in accordance with orders received, 

ire advanced with the brigade up the Richmond and Petersburg torn- 
pike. The regiment was constantly to the front from this date until 
tin- evening of the 16th, a large portion of the time acting in connec- 
tion with the 118th N. Y. Vols.. aa a reserve for the skirmishers ad- 
vancing slowly toward- the outer work- around Fort Darling. On 
the morning of the 11th, in connection with the 118th N. Y. Vols.. 
we charged and captured the enemy's outer line of intrenchments, 
and were ordered into position along the line of work-, our right rest- 
ing on the turnpike. This position we held until the morning of the 
lGth, when the enemy charged on our forces to our right, and drove 
them, leaving our Hank entirely exposed. Finding our right Hank 
thus exposed, I ordered three companies to protect the flank, but it 
was found impossible to hold that position, therefore they fell back 
under cover of the woods. 

We held our position on the works for some time with considerable 
loss, until flanked both right and left, when we fell back in as good 
order as possible under the circumstances, the fog and smoke being 
so dense that it was impossible for officers or men to distinguish each 
other. We then took a position between the 10th N. H. Vols, and 
118th N. Y. Vols. We remained in this position until the 118th K« 
Y. fell back, when we took our position on the right of the 10th N. IF. 
where we remained until nearly noon, when we were ordered to fall 
back. Not to expose my men more than possible, I ordered them to fall 
back two or three at a time. On the afternoon of the 16th, we moved, 
together with the brigade, forward to near the enemy's work-, where 
we remained until evening, when ordered to fall back to camp. 

Our loss from May 12th to ICth was seven killed, thirty wounded, 
and twenty-eight missing. This number includes one commissioned 
officer killed and one wounded. 

Too much praise can not be given to both officers and men for their 
faithful performance of every duty. 
Very respectfully, 

Your Ob'd't Servant, 

M. B. SMITH, 

U Col. CorndTg^th Conn. Vols. 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 185 

Head-Quarters 8th Regiment Conn. Vols., \ 
Cold Harbor, Va., June 11th, 1864. ) 

Brig. Gen. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 

General : 

I have the honor to forward the following report of the operations 

of my command since June 1st, 1864. 

At six o'clock A. M. June 1st, we left our bivouac, twelve miles 

from White House Landing, Va., marching with the column towards 
New Castle, Va. During the afternoon we halted near the enemy's 
lines near Coal Harbor. After resting about an hour, we formed in 
line of battle, the left of the Brigade resting on the right of the 6th 
Corps, our position being between the 10th N. H. Vols, on the right, 
and the 118th N. Y. Vols, on the left. In this line we moved for- 
ward to the support of the advanced line, halting one hundred paces 
in the rear of that line. About seven o'clock, P. M. the advanced 
line having been withdrawn to the right, we advanced, crossing an 
open field in our front, and moved into the woods beyond, where we 
constructed temporary breastworks, and having ascertained, through 
scouts sent out, that the pickets of the brigades to the right and left 
of us did not connect, by direction of Capt. Clark, A. A. General, 
pickets from our regiment were posted to cover our front. Our loss 
during the day was two killed and four wounded. 

Before daylight the next day, (June 2d,) we were ordered to relieve 
the 40th Mass. Vols., who were occupying the front lines to our right, 
forming on the left of the 10th N. H. Vols. During the day, under 
a heavy fire, we completed a breastwork which had been commenced 
on this line, within two hundred yards of the enemy's works. Our 
loss this day was one killed and six wounded. 

On the forenoon of the next day, (June 3d,) this regiment, with 
the 118th N. Y. Vols, and 13th N. H. Vols., were formed in massed 
column by division, the 8th Conn. Vols, having the center, for the 
purpose of charging upon the enemy's Avorks. In this order we 
marched to our advanced line, and there remained until four o'clock 
P. M., when the order for the charge was countermanded, and we 
were withdrawn to a more sheltered position. In the evening we 
advanced to the support of the front line, relieving the 25th Mass., 
and during the night completed breastworks commenced by them 
Our loss this day was one killed and twelve wounded. 



186 adjutant-general's report. 

Between three and four o'clock A. M., June 4th, by order of Gen. 
Martindale, we advanced to the extreme front, relieving the 2d N. H. 
Vols., and immediately commenced and finished during the day, a 
line of breastworks, our hit connecting with a line being erected by 
the 13th N. II. Vols. About midnight we were relieved by the 139th 
N. Y. Vols., and withdrawn to one of the rear lines. Our loss this 
day was one killed and six wounded. 

In this position we remained until the evening of the Gth, with the 
loss of one wounded, when we advanced and relieved the 92d N. Y. 
Vols., in which position we remained for twenty-four hours, as sup- 
ports for the 10th N. II. Vols. Loss, one man wounded. 

On the evening of the 7th, we were relieved by the 139th N. Y. 
Vols., and withdrawn to the rear lines, where we remained until the 
evening of the 9th. Loss during the two days, one killed and one 
wounded. 

I am, General, 

Very respectfully, 

Your Ob'd't Servant, 

CHAS. M. COIT, 

Captain Com'oVg 8th Conn. Vols. 

List of Casualties in the Sth Regiment Conn. Vols, from the 1st to the 
\0th of June, inclusive, at Cold Harbor, Va. 

KILLED. 
Company A. 



Private, John Phelan. 
Private, William Long. 
Private, Thomas L. Green. 
Private, John B. Mcintosh. 



Company B. 
Company F. 
Company G. 
Company H. 



Privates, Charles Payne. 

Richmond Thomas. 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 187 

WOUNDED. 

Company A. 
1st Serg't, Albion D. Brooks, groin ; since dead. 
Privates, James L. Crampton, side, seriously. 
Frank Miller, shoulder, severely. 

Company B. 

Corporal, Andrew Gordon, left shoulder, seriously. 
Privates, William Darby, arm, slightly. 

Norton O. McCann, right foot, seriously. 

Edward Williams, arm, slightly. 

John Sherman, arm, slightly. 

Walter Smithson, left side, slightly. 

Company C. 
Private, William Post, left side, since dead. 

Company D. 
Sergeant, James T. Colton, back, slightly. 
Corporal, Edward M. Weaver, hand, slightly. 
Privates, Addison F. Thompson, breast, slightly. 
James C. Jennings, toe, amputated. 

i 
Company E. 

Privates, Michael O. Harra, arm, amputated. 
Charles N. Landon, foot. 

Company F. 
Sergeant, Daniel N. Mix, right arm, severely. 
Privates, George W. Upton, neck, mortally. 

Robert Payne, left shoulder, slightly. 

George Davis, hand, slightly. 

Patrick Welch, shoulder, slightly. 

Abraham Tillotson, shoulder, slightly. 

Company G. 
Privates, Edwin Alger, head, slightly. 

Abram Munson, left arm, severely. 
Cornelius Dwyre, shoulder, slightly. 

Company H. 
Sergeant, Jacob Bishop, foot, slightly. 



188 adjutant-general's report. 

Company I. 
Sergeant, Joseph li. Weed, body, Beriousry. 
Corporal Dwighl Hollister, thighs, seriously. 
Private, Edward Maguire, back, Blightly. 

Company K. 

Privates, Augustas W. Morse, bead, .-lightly. 
John Smith, arm, slightly. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted men, - - - 6 

Wounded, Enlisted men, ... 31 

Total, ... 37 
CHARLES M. COIT, 

Capt. ComoVg the Reg't. 

Head-Quarters, 8th Reg't Conn. Vol. Inf'y,| 
Near Petersburg, Va., June 28, 1864. j 

Brig. Gi*n. H. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 

General : 

I have the honor to render the following report of the operations 
of this regiment from the loth to the 17th inst., inclusive. On the 
morning of the loth inst., at 2 o'clock, A. M., the regiment, two hun- 
dred strong, occupying the right of the brigade, moved across the 
Appomattox, and out on the road to Petersburg, Va. The first line 
of the enemy's works having been captured by General Hinks' com- 
mand, (colored,) this regiment was advanced to the front, about a half 
mile beyond the captured works, and the left wing, under Captain 
Roberts, deployed as skirmishers on the left of the road, and soon 
came up with the enemy, when the right wing was also deployed, the 
color-guard being sent to the rear. The line advancing, drove them 
a quarter of a mile through the woods, at which point their strong 
fortifications were discovered. The men covering themselves as much 
as possible, by the trees on the left, and a thick jungle on the right, 
advanced as close to the works as these afforded shelter, and kept up 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 189 

a deliberate fire on the enemy's works, and our right were enabled 
to almost entirely silence the artillery in the strong fort in their front. 
About noon, the enemy charged upon the center of our line, but were 
repulsed with considerable loss. At 6 o'clock, P. M., the two com- 
panies, (G and K.,) armed with Sharps' Rifles, occupying the center 
of our line, having during the day expended their sixty rounds of 
ammunition, and being unable to procure an additional supply of that 
calibre, were relieved by two companies of the 118th New York 
Volunteers. At 7 o'clock, P. M., in accordance with orders from 
General Burnham, Commanding Brigade, the skirmish line, the 13th 
Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers on the left, and the eight com- 
panies of the 8th Conn. Vols, with the detachment of the 118th 
New York Vols, on the right, advanced, and charging upon the 
enemy's works, captured them, with two hundred and fifty prisoners, 
and five field pieces. The regiment immediately advanced to a hill 
in the rear of the captured works, within two miles of Petersburg, 
and directly in front of the enemy's inner line of works. Here we 
built breast-works, and remained in support of batteries that were 
brought up during the night, until six and a half o'clock, P. M., on 
the 17th instant, when we were relieved by the 3d Vermont Regi- 
ment of the 6th Corps. We marched, during the night, to Point of 
Rocks. Our casualties which all occurred during the first days' ope- 
rations were 2 killed and 17 wounded. The behavior of the whole 
command, officers and men, was in the highest degree commendable. 
I am, very respectfully, 

Your ob't servant, 

CHARLES M. COIT, 

Capt. Com'dg 8th Conn. Vols. 



List of Casualties in the 8th RegH Conn. Vols, in the operations in 
front of Petersburg, Va.,from the 15th to the 17 th of June, inclusive. 

KILLED 

Company E. 
Private, George W. Mitchell. 

Company I. 
Sergeant, Fitz G. Hollister. 



190 

WOUNDED. 
Compact A. 

Private, John Benjamin, arm, severely. 

Company B. 

Private, John K. Fraser. left breast, slightly. 

Company C. 
Private, William J. Chadsey, right shoulder, slightly. 

Company D. 
Corporal, John A. Beckwith, foot. 
Privates, William Bubb, head. 

Horace Burton, hip and arm. 

Sylvanus Wilcox, arm, slightly. 

Company E. 
Private, Frederick W. Hefflen, side, slightly. 

Company F. 
Privates, John Williams, head, severely. 

Thomas R. Barnett, leg and hand, severely. 

Company G. 
Private, William H. Terwilliger, ear, slightly. 

Company H. 
Sergeants, Stephen Hodges, shoulder, severely. 
Charles Piatt, hip, severely. 

Company I. 
Private, Orville Sprague, leg, severely. 

Company K. 
Privates, Charles R. Jones, hip, severely. 
Lewis Allen, arm, slightly. 
Augustus W. Morse, neck, slightly. 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 191 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Enlisted Men, ... 2 

Wounded, " " - - - 17 

Total, - - 19 

CHAS. M. COIT, 

Capt. ComoVg the Regt. 

List of Killed and Wounded in the Stk Conn. Vet. Vols, from March 
1st, 1864, to February 28th, 1865, not heretofore reported. 

KILLED. 

Company B. 

Privates, James Dunn, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 1864. 
Daniel Wensenger, " " 29, 1864. 

Company E. 

2d Lieut., Charles N. Irwin, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 1864. 
lstSerg't,Seth F. Plumb, " " " 29,1864. 

Privates, William H. Peterson, on Petersburg & R. R. R., May 9, '64. 
William A. Smith, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 1864. 

Company F. 
Captain, Henry C. Hall, at Petersburg, July 11, 1864. 

Company G. 
Corporal, William H. Durfee, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 1864. 
Private, Gilbert G. Reynolds, " " " 29, 1864. 

Company H. 
Private, James Glynn, at Petersburg, June, 1864. 

Company K. 
1st Lieut., James B. Kilbourne, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 1864. 

WOUNDED. 

Field and Staff. 
Colonel, John E. Ward, side, at Walthall Junction, May 7, 1864. 
Lt. Col, Martin B. Smith, leg, severely, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29/64. 
Hospital Steward, Willett W. Kingsley, foot, slight, at Fort Harrison, 
Sept. 29, 1864. 



102 adjutant-general's report. 

Principal Muticicai) William Kerr, head, slight, at Fort Harrison, 
Nov. 29, 1864. 

Company A. 
ljfZ&ict, Samuel S. Fobs, hip, severe, al Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, '64. 
Sergeantsf&'&imu'X K. LoomU, knee, severe, al Petersburg, Aug. 23/64. 

AlpheOfi Gr. Porter, eye, severe, at u July, 1864. 

James Winchell, thigh, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept 29/64. 

Privates, Peter Austin, " " " " " 29/64. 

Joseph Brown, « " " « " 29/64. 

Angus! Brooks, head, " at Petersburg, July 26, 1864. 
Alfred Dufont, thigh, " at Fort Harrison. Sept 29/64. 
Robert Gregory, bowel-. Blight, at Petersburg. June. 1864. 
Robert Hickman, arm, severe, " July 17, '64. 

John Hardy, hip, " at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29/34. 

James Shinners, hip, " " " Oct. 1, 1864. 

Albert G. Thomas, breast, severe, at Petersburg & R. 
R. R., May 9, 1864. 

Company B. 
Captain, Charles M. Coit, shoulder, severe, at Fair Oaks, Oct. 28/64. 
Sergea?its,Joseph Glover, head, at Petersburg, July 2, 1864 — died. 

John Scott, side, slight, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 1864. 
Privates, Gotleib Baker, thigh, slight, " " " 29, 1864. 

William Cook, leg, severe, at Petersburg, July, 1864. 

Peter Gourley, arm, slight, at Cold Harbor, June 2, 1864. 

Hugh Lamont, ankle, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29/64. 

Henry Steele, shoulder, slight," " " 29/64. 

Robert Watson, arm, " at Petersburg, June 16, 1864. 

Company C. 

1st Lieut., John A. Rathburn, leg, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29/64. 
1st Serg't, John C. Cooley, neck, slight, at Petersburg, June 16, 1864. 
Sergeant, Orlow W. Root, head, " at Cold Harbor, June 5, 1864. 
Corporal, Edward 1). Carpenter, leg, at Fort Harrison — died. 
Privates, James Birney, arm and breast, severe, at Fort Darling, 
May 16, 1864. 

Richard Bidwell, hip, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29/64. 

Christopher Burton, shoulder, severe, at Fort Harrison, 
Sept. 29, 1864. 

Lucius Clark, shoulder, severe, at Ft. Harrison, Sept. 29/64. 

Albert H. Cross, leg, slight, at Petersburg, July 27, 1864. 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 193 

Privates, Patrick II. Harrington, head, slight, at Cold Harbor, June 

5, 1864. 
Samuel Paxton, hip, alight, at Petersburg, June 16, 1864. 
George Rogers, leg, " at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, '64. 
John L. Thomas, head, severe, at Walthall Junction, May 

7, 1864. 
Alvin C. Rice, head, severe, at Petersburg, July 23, 1864. 

Company D. 
2d Lieut., Amos L. Keables, groin, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 

1864. 
Sergeants,Joseph H. Jewett, shoulder, slight, at Petersburg, July 30, 
1864. 
Joseph H. Jewett, foot, slight, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 2 9,' 64. 
Corporal, Thomas Costello, shoulder, at Petersburg, July 16, 1864 — 

died. 

Privates, James Carpenter, foot, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29/64. 

John Curley, head, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 1864 — died. 

William Webster, leg, slight, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29,'64. 

Patrick H. Whealon, shoulder, severe, at Petersburg, June 

23, 1864. 

Company E. 
Sergeants, Frank Edens, shoulder, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 
1864. 
Benjamin F. Page, severe, at Fort Harrison, Oct. 1/64. 
Samuel L.Williams, head, " " " Sept. 29/64. 

Privates, John Brockett, " " " " ." 29/64. 

Frederick Coon, neck, arm and side, severe, at Fort Harri- 
son, Sept. 29, 1864. 
Charles Cosier, leg, slight, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29/64. 
Peter Dipper, hand, " " " " 29/64. 

John Martin, shoulder, severe," " Oct. 3, 1864. 

James McNurney, head, slight," " Sept. 29/64. 

John Owens, forehead, " " " " 29/64. 

Edward Spengler, bowels, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29/64-— 

died. * 

Bennett Smith, arm, slight, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29,1864. 

Company F. 
Captain, Andrew M. Morgan, foot, slight, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 
1864. 
13 



194 adjutant-general's report. 

1st Scrg't, George A. Rouse, leg, amputated, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 

29, 1864. 

Privates, George Beach, Blight, at Fori Harrison, Sept. 29, 18G4. 

Jamei lint tun, leg, severe, " " " 29, 1864. 

Lein (ii-ati; groin, at Fort Harrison, S.-pt. 29, 18G4 — died. 

Charles E. Qleason, shoulder, slight, at Fort Harrison, 

Sept 29, 1864. 
John GranicstedcQer, head, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 

29, 1864. 
Dwighl X. \\\ head, slight, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 1864. 
A brain Tillottson, head, severe, « " " 29,1864. 

COMPAHT G. 

( bptain, Roger M. Ford, hip, severe, at Petersburg, June 25, 1864. 

Private^ C'liarles Baird, leg, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 1864 — died. 

-lames P. Conlan, side, slight, at Petersburg, June 16, 1864. 

Cornelius Dwier, leg, at Petersburg, July, 1864 — died. 

Charles W. Lamphere, leg, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 

1864— died. 
William McDougal, shoulder, slight, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 

29, 1864. 
Joseph Monti, foot, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, '64. 
Joseph D. Nye, arm, slight, " " " 29, '64. 

Frederick Trappell, head, severe, at Fort Harrison, Oct. 1, 
1864. 

Company H. 

Captain, Elam T. Goodrich, hip, severe, at Petersburg, 1864. 

1st Lieut.,Thomns S. Weed, face, slight, at Fort Harrison, Oct. 1,'64. 

Sergeant, Charles H. Hill, shoulder, severe, " " Sept. 29,'64. 

Privates, John W. Bouton, body, severe, at Petersburg, June 22, '64. 
James 0. Jennings, head, slight,- " " 29, '64. 

Calvin A. Smith, hand, on Petersburg & R. R. R.. May 9/64 
Henry Smith, head, at Petersburg, June 16, 1864 — died. 

Company I. 

Captain, William J. Roberts, foot, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 

29, 1864. 
Corpora/SjAshbel E. Bartram, leg, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 

1864. 
Lyman F. Bradley, leg. amputated, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 

29, 1864. 



EIGHTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 195 

Privates, Levi Cook, hip, slight, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 20, 1864. 

Phineas Hyde, head, severe, at Petersburg, June 16, 1864. 
Edward Maguire, leg, " at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29/64. 
Joshua Pratt, " " " " " 29/64. 

Charles Woodruff, head," at Petersburg, June 16, 1864. 

Company K. 
Co?-poraIs, Heber L. Bassett, side, severe, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 
1864. 
Charles Lewis, at Petersburg, Aug., 1864 — died. 
Privates, Frank J. Carter, bruise, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29, 1864. 
Henry G. Parker, back, slight, at Petersburg, June, 1864. 
Joseph A. Root, hand, slight, at Fort Harrison, Sept. 29/64. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Killed, Commissioned Officers, - - 3 

Enlisted Men, 8 

Wounded, Commissioned Officers, - - - 11 

Enlisted Men, ... 87 

Total, - - 109 



196 



ADJUTANT-GENERALS REPORT 



NINTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 



Rnnk and Name. 



Residence. 



Colo 

Thomas W. Caliill, New Haven, 

Lit ut. Colonel*. 

John (J. Healer, New Haven, 
Richard Fitzgibbons, Bridgeport, 

Major. 

Frederick Frye, Bridgeport, 

Adjutant. 
Henry Kattens broth, Bridgeport, 

Quartei-moster. 

Thomas Fitzgibbonp Bridgeport, 

Chaplain. 

Leo Rizzo, New Haven, 
Surgeons. 

Rollin McNeil, New Haven, 
Chas. A. Gallagher, New Haven, 

1st Asst. Surgeon. 

Rollin McNeil, Now Haven, 

Captains. 

William A. Lee, Bridgeport, 

James YV. Graham, Berlin, 

Garry T. Scott, Plymouth, 

Patrick Garvev, New Haven, 

William Wright, Hartford, 

Elliott M. Carries, Bridgeport, 
Mich'l A. Williams, New Haven, 

John G. Healey, New Haven, 

Thomas Hailey, Derby, 

Lawrence O'Brien, New Haven, 

Terrenee Sheridan, New Haven, 

Addis E. Payne, Norwich, 

1st Lieutenants. 

David C. Warner, Hartford, 

Joseph II. Lawler, Norwich, 
John Bolger, 

John Carroll, New Haven, 

Francis McKeon, New Haven, 

Michael Kennedy, New Haven, 

William A. Lee,* Bridgeport, 

James W. Graham, Berlin, 

James Cahill, ;Bridgeport, 

John Curtiss, (Bridgeport, 

Garry T. Scott, Plymouth, 

Michael Mullens, |New Haven, 

2d Lieutenants. 

Christian Strcit, ;New Haven, 

William Gleason, Mew Haven, 

Edmund Downing, Norwich, 



Date of 

Comnii-iuii, 



Sept. 3,1861 

Nov. 22,1804 
Sept 3,1861 

Oct. 28,1861 

Oct 2,1862 

Sept. 3,1863 

July 15,1864 

Nov. 18,1864 
Oct. 4,1861 

June 16,1864 

April 1,1864 
Dec. 5,1864 
Dec. 5,1864 
Sept. 7,1861 
Sept. 9,1861 
Oct. 28,1861 
April 10,1862 



April 15,1862 Promoted Lt. Col., Nov. 22, 1864. 
July 29,1862!Must'd out Oct. 26, '64, term exp'd 
Oct. 15,1862 " " 26, '64, 

Oct. 25,1862 " Nov.14, '64, 

Oct. 26, '64, 



Oct. 25,1 
Nov. 21,1863 



Remarks. 



Must'd out Oct. 26, 1864, term exp'd. 

Mu-t'd out Oct. 26, 1864, term exp'd. 
Must'd out Oct. 26, 1864, term exp'd. 
Must'd out Oct. 26, '64, term exp'd. 
Must'd out Oct 26, '64, term exp'd. 
Mustered out Oct. 26, 1864. 

Must'd out Oct. 26, '64, term exp'd. 
Must'd out Oct. 26, '64, term exp'd. 



Must'd out Oct. 26, '64, term exp'd. 
26, '64, 
26, '64, 
26, '64. 



April 1,1864 
Dec. 5,1864 
Dec. 22,1864 
Sept. 18,1861 
Oct. 25,1862 



Must'd out Oct. 26, '64, term exp'd. 
26, '64, 



Jan. 31,1863 Honorably discharged Oct. 14, 1864. 



Ang. 15,1862 
April 6,1863 
May 29,1863 
Sept. 3,1863 



Promoted Captain April 1,1864. 
Dec. 5, 1864. 
Mu<t'd out Oct. 26, '64, term exp'd. 
26, '64, 



Sept. 3,1863 Promoted Captain Dec. 5, 1864. 

April 1,1864 Mustered out Nov. 26,'64,term exp'd, 

June 30,1864 
Dec. 5,1864 
Dec. 5,1864 



NINTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 197 

Ninth Regiment Infantry — Continued. 



Rank and Name. 



2c? Lieutenants. 

William O'Keefe, 
Joseph H. Lawler, 

Lewis II. Goodman, 
Michael Mullens, 
David C. Warner, 
James Lawler, 
Thomas L. Wilson, 
Thomas Connor, 
John Bolger, 



Residence. 



New Haven, 
Norwich, 
Hartford, 
New Haven, 
Hartford, 
New Haven, 
Bridgeport, 
Danburv, 



Date of 
Commission. 



Jan. 26,1863 

Jan. 26,1863 

10,1863 

6,1863 

29,1863 

3,1863 

21,1863 

21,1863 

1.1864 



Mch. 

April 

May 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

April 



Remarks. 



Must'd out Oct. 26, '64, term exp'd. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. Dec. 5, 1864. 
Must'd out Nov. 26, '64, term exp'd. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. April 1, 1864. 
" " " 1, 1864. 

Must'd out Oct. 26, '64, term exp'd. 
" 26, '64, 
Mch. 3, '65, " 

Promoted 1st Lieut. Dec. 22, 1864. 



In April, 1864, this regiment came home on veteran furlough, 
and remained in the State until July 16th, when it proceeded 
to New York : thence by steamer to Bermuda Hundred, Va., 
where it arrived July 20th. Here it remained until July 28th, 
when it proceeded to Deep Bottom and participated in a demon- 
stration against the enemy. The regiment returned to Bermuda 
Hundred July 30th, from which place it embarked and proceeded 
to Washington, D. C, arriving there August 1st. On the next 
day it proceeded to Tenallytown, D. C, where it remained until 
August 14th. On that day it marched across the Potomac, via 
Chain Bridge, and proceeded, via Leesburg and Snicker's Gap, 
to Berryville, arriving there August 17th. From that time it 
participated in the campaign in the Shenandoah Valley, under 
General Sheridan. 

In October the non-veterans of the regiment were mustered 
out, and the remaining veterans were consolidated into a bat- 
talion of four companies. 

The further history of the battalion is given by Lieutenant 
Colonel Healey, commanding. 



198 adjutant-general's report. 

1 1 i.ad-Quarters, 9tii Batt. Conn. Vet. Vols., "j 
Savannah, Ga., March 1st, 1865.) 

Brig. Gen. II. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 
Sir: 

In reply to your communication of February 6th, I would most 
respectfully report, that all books and papers, records, etc. of the reg- 
iment were taken North by Colonel T. W. Cahill, so that we have 
no record of the regiment previous to October 12th, 1864. 

The 9th Regiment Connecticut Veteran Volunteers were consoli- 
dated into a battalion of four companies, October 12th, 1864, by Spe- 
cial Order No. 59, Extract 5, Head-Quarters 19th Army Corps. At 
that date wc were in camp at Cedar Creek, Va., and remained there 
until November 9th, when we moved to Camp Russell, Va., a dis- 
tance of ten miles. 

The battalion participated in the battle of Cedar Creek. Va., Oct. 
19th, official report of which has been sent you. 

December 30th, moved from Camp Russell, Va., to Camp Sheri- 
dan, Va., distance eight miles, and remained there until January 7th, 
1865, when we were with our division, the second, ordered to Balti- 
more, Md. January 10th embarked on board U. S. Transport " Gen- 
eral Sedgwick." Arrived at Savannah, Ga., January 17th, where 
we are now stationed doing Provisional Guard duty. 
I am, with respect, your ob't servant, 

JOHN G. HEALY, 

Lieut- Col. 9th Conn. Vet. Vols. 



Head-Quarters, 9tii Conn. Vet. Battalion, ) 
Cedar Creek, Va., Oct, 27th, 1864. ) 
Brig. Gen. Horace J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General State of Connecticut. 
General : 

I have the honor to forward you a copy of my report to Head- 
Quarters 2d Division 19th Army Corps, of the part borne by the 
9th Connecticut Veteran Battalion in the battle of Cedar Creek, Va., 
October 19th, 1864. 

I am, General, 

Very respectfully, 

Your ob't servant, 

JOHN G. HEALY, 

Captain Commanding. 



NINTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 199 



Head-Quarters, 9th Batt. Conn. Vols.,) 
Cedar Creek, Va., October 26th, 1864. ) 

Capt. E. A. Fiske, 

A. A. Geril 2d Div. ldtk A. C. 

Sir: 

I have the honor to report the part taken by the 9th Connecticut 
Battalion, in the fight of the 19th instant. We were under arms and 
at the breast-works at 5 o'clock, A. M. At that time a heavy volley 
of musketry was heard on our left, which was followed soon after by 
artillery firing and a continuous one of musketry. There was now 
every indication that we were flanked, as we were receiving a fire 
from our rear. At about six o'clock we received orders to strike 
tents, which was immediately done, when we again formed at the 
breastworks. In a few moments we discovered that the regiments on 
our left had fallen back. I immediately ordered my men to move by 
the right flank, and to keep along our line of works. This order was 
obeyed, the men keeping together well. After we had reached the 
top of the hill to our left, we formed in line of battle, and delivered 
a well directed fire at the enemy, with marked effect. We were then 
ordered to fall back down the hill. As we reached the foot of the 
hill, an Aid to General Birge ordered us to advance up the hill again ; 
this we did in good order, and delivered another volley at the advanc- 
ing enemy. They being close upon us, we again fell back, crossed 
the creek and remained there until ordered to fall back to the top of 
the next hill ; here we found part of our brigade had formed in line 
of battle behind a breastwork. I ordered my men to form on the 
right of the brigade, which they did, and for a while we succeeded in 
checking the advance of the enemy. 

We were now ordered to fall back slowly, this we did ; men of 
other regiments were running by us, going in all directions to the 
rear. Very few musketry shots were now fired at us, the enemy's 
and our own artillery doing the firing. My battalion fell back to 
where the 2d Division 19th Corps had formed. I reported to Capt. 
E. A. Fiske, A. D. C, who directed me to my position in line. 
About half past 9 o'clock, the line was ordered to fail back to a wood 
near us, where we again formed in line of battle ; we remained here 
but a short time, when we were ordered to move by right of regiments 
to the rear ; we had moved but a short distance, when we were or- 
dered to about face, and, occupying a new position, formed in line of 



200 adjutant-general's report. 

battle. We remained but a few moments when we were ordered for- 
ward and to the left in the woods. The line was formed, and a pro- 
tection from bullets was hastily thrown up by our men. Now we 
were ordered to be readj for a forward movement ; it was directed, 
when we advanced through the woods, the enemy pouring shot and 
shell into us, bat with very little effect We now received orders to 
charge ; my men went at it with a will, the colors of my battalion 
being always in the advance. The officers of the 9th rallied their 
men and they pressed forward after the retreating enemy. The chase 
was kept up until dark. The enemy being driven from the field, we 
were now ordered to occupy our old camp. 

During the battle of the 19th, the officers of my battalion were 
particularly noticed as being always at their post, near and around 
the flag. The men obeyed the orders of their officers with prompt- 
ed a hearty good will. 

We were highly complimented by our Brigade Commander, Brig. 
Gen. Birge, who told us we had done nobly and held well our own. 
I desire to make particular mention of Sergeant W. Perry and Pri- 
vate John J. Morrow, who, after the Color Sergeant had been 
wounded, seized the colors and pushed forward. These men were 
always in the advance — few, if any color-bearers being able to keep 
up with them. The Colors of my Battalion were the first on the re- 
captured works from where the Eighth Corps were driven in the 
morning ; in less than five minutes no less than a dozen stand of 
colors were around us. 

The following are the Casualties : 

Commissioned Officers, missing, - - 1 

" " wounded, - - 2 

Enlisted men killed, 2 

Enlisted men wounded, - - - - 16 

Enlisted men missing, - - - 10 
I am, very respectfully, 

Your ob't servant, 

JOHN G. HEALY, 
Captain ConioVg dth Conn. Battalion. 



TENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 



201 



TENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 



Rank and Name. 



Colonels. 
Edwin S. Greeley, 
John L. ( >ti>, 
George W. White, 
Lieut. Colonels. 
Ellsw.D.S. Goodyear 
Robert Leggett, 
Edwin S. Greeley, 

Majors. 
Frank Hawkins, 
Edwin S. Greeley, 
Henry W. Cam]), 
Ellsw.D.S. Goodyear 

Adjutants. 
George R. Tnrnbull, 
Henry W. Camp, 
Quartermasters. 
Horace K. Parsons, 
Royal Fowler, 

Chaplain. 
H. Clay Trumbull, 

Surgeons. 
Charles R. Hart, 
Horace P. Porter, 
1st Asst. Surgeons. 
Nathan H. Wright, 
Charles R. Hart, 
Wm. H.Trowbridge, 

2d Asst. Surgeon. 
Henry A. Page, 

Captains. 
Henry A. Peck, 
Frank G. Hickerson, 
James H. Lindsley, 
George H. Brown, 
Dan'l W.Boardman, 
Robert W. Adams, 
Henry L. Parker, 
John's. Bartlett, 
Brainerd Smith, 
Francis E. Burt, 
Ellsw.D.S. Goodyear 
Benjamin Jepson, 
Charles C. Brewster 
James S. Engles, 
BenjaminL. Greaves 
Selleck L. White, 
Horace F. Qninn, 
William M. Webb, 
Albert T. Campbell 
Frank Hawkins, 



Residence. 



New Haven, 
Manchester, 
New Haven, 

New Haven, 
New London 
New Haven, 

Derby, 
New Haven, 
Hartford, 
New Haven, 

Hartford, 
Hartford, 

Enfield, 
Thompsonv'e 

Hartford, 

Hartford, 
New Haven, 



Hartford, 
Stamford, 

New Haven, 

Bristol, 

Derby, 

No. Branford, 

New London, 

Derby, 

New London, 

Lyme, 

Sprague, 

Milford, 

Hartford, 

New Haven, 

New Haven, 

Hartford, 

Derby, 

Stamford, 

Danbury, 

New London, 

New London, 

Voluntown, 

Derby, 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Dec. 

Feb. 
Nov. 

Aug. 

Mch. 
Feb. 
Aug. 
Oct. 

Feb. 
Aug. 

July 
Oct. 



Date of 
Commission. 



9,1865 

18,1863 

9,1864j 

9,1865 
21,1862! 
29,1864 

4,1865| 
18,1863, 
29,1864 
24,1864 

6,1865 
5,1862 

25,1864 
4,1861 



Remarks. 



Sept. 10,1862 



Nov. 
Mch. 

Dec. 
July 
Nov. 



2,1864 
14,1864 

24,1864 
21,1862 
29,1864 



Jan. 19,1865 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Mch. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Aug. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 



24,1864 
24,1864 
25,1864 

7,1864 
10,1864 
10,1864 
10,1864 
10,1864 
23,1864 

4,1865 
16,1861 
14,1861 

4,1862 
14,1862 
25,1862 
21,1862 
21,1862 
28,1863 
28,1863 
28,1863 



Must, out Oct. 16, 1864; term exp'd. 
Commission revoked Dec. 23, 1864.* 



Honorably discharged Aug. 15, 1864. 
Promoted" ColonefFeb. 9, 1865. 



Promoted Lt. Colonel Aug. 29, 1864. 
Killed in action Oct. 13, 1864. 
Promoted Lt. Colonel Feb. 9, 1865. 



Promoted Major Aug. 29, 1864. 
Resigned July 4, 1864. 

Honorably discharged Nov. 5, 1864. 



Promoted Surgeon Nov. 2, 1 864. 
Declined commission Dec. 6, 1864. 



Promoted Major Oct. 24, 1864. 
Resigned June 1, 1864. 
Honorably discharged Sept. 19, 1864. 
Must, out Oct. 16,1864; term exp'd. 

" 25,1864; 
Died of wounds. 
Died Aug. 14, 1864. 
Must, out Oct. 1 6, 1864 ; term exp'd. 

" 25,1864; 
Promoted Major March 4, 1865. 



* The number of men in Regiment was too small to permit muster as Colonel. 



202 



A D J U T A N T - 9 B N B R A L ' S R E P R T . 
Tenth Regiment Infantry — Continued. 






Rank and Name. ' Residence. 



]) • 
CommN-ion. 



1st Lieutenants. 

George C. Ripl 
Arthur F. B 
John W.IIawxhurst, 
Julius Neidhart, 
George W. Hatching, 
Walter P. II..-. 
Thomas J. Stillman, 
William A. Robbing, 
Edward L. Smith, 
Chas T. Martin, Jr., 
Sanford B. Pali 
Geo rge X. MaUory, 
William II. Marshall, 
Henry A. IVck, 
Henry H. Lincoln, 
Francifl G. Hickerson 
Bradley S. Keith, 
Benjamin Wright, 
James II. Lindsley, 
George II. Brown, 
Robert W. Adams, 
Daniel W.Boardman 
Francis E. Burt, 
George Northrop, 
Henry L. Parker, 
George C. Peck, 
John S. Bartlett, 
Brainard Smith, 
William B. Curtiss. 
George R. Turnbull, 

2d Lieutenants. 
Joseph Grinsell, 
Henry L. Hull, 
James W. Benedict, 
John B. Newell, 
Andrew F. Jones, 
David II. Holm 
George F. I 
Orlando S. GofF, 
Wm. G. Chapman, 
Thomas B. Fowler, 
Benjamin Wright, 
George H. Brown, 
Henry K. (Thirty, 
James II. Lindsley, 
William L. Sai 
Albert F. Sharp,' 
Horace K. Parsons, 
William J. Broatch, 
William A. Bobbins, 
Edward L. Smith, 



Norwich, 
Main!. 
Hartford, 
Southington, 

Marlborough 
Hartford, 

Greenwich, 

I i a veil, 
Hartford, 
Sharon, 
New Haven, 
Greenwich, 
Bristol, 
Coventry, 
Derby, 
New Canaan, 
Greenwich, 
Xo. Branford 
New London, 
New London, 
Derby, 
Hartford, 
Hartford, 
Lyme, 

Woodbridge, 
Spragne, 
Milfbrd, 
Canton, 
Hartford, 

Hartford, 
Killingworth, 
Xew Canaan, 
Stamford, 
New Canaan, 
Simsbury, 
Mancl: 
Hartford, 
Spragne, 
Guilford, 
Greenwich, 
Xew London, 
Xew London, 
Xo. Branford. 
Greenwich, 
Xew Haven, 
Enfield, 
Xew London, 
Greenwich, 
Haven, 



Jan. 
Oct 
Dec, 

D .-. 

Dec. 

Mch. 
Mch. 
Aug. 

An- 

An-. 
Mch. 

Sept. 
Sept. 

Oct. 
Oet 

Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Xov. 
Xov, 
Dec. 
Dec. 

Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 

Mch. 
Mch. 
Nov. 

Not. 

June 

June 

June 

Jan 

Jan. 



Remarks. 






19,1863 
25,1864 
10,1864 
10,1864 

10,1864 

10,1864 

2,1S65 

2,1865 

4,1862 

26,1862 
21,1863 

28,1S63| 
28,1863 
28,1863 
28,1863 | 

24,1864 
24,1S64| 
25,1864 
25,1S64 ! 
25,1864! 

25,1864 

27,1S64 

7,1864 

10,1S64 
8,1864 

7,1865 
7,1865 

7,1865 
7,1865 
12 • 
6,1865 
6,1865 
2,1865 
2,1865 



Must, out Xov. 11,1 S64 ; term exp'd. 

<> :. 25, 1864; 
Honorably. b - . 1864. 

Must, out 

Promoted Captain Sept. 24. 
Must, out Oct. 25, . exp'd. 

Promoted Captain Sept. 24. I 
Must, out Oct., 1SC4 ; term exp'd. 

" 16, 1864; 
Promoted Captain Oct. 25, 

Xov. 7, 

Dec. 10, 



1864. 

1 -04. 

1-04. 



Mch. 4. 
Died before muster as 1st Lieut. 
Promoted Captain Dec. 10, 1 
Declined commission. 
Promoted Captain Dec. 10, 1864. 
u o 3) i. 

Commission revoked March 3, 1865. 
Promoted Adjutant Feb. 6, 1 - 



18,1863j 
8 

2£ S 



Promoted 1st Lieut. Mch. 16, 1864. 
1st " Sept. 24, 1864. 
Resigned, disability, Sept. 2u. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. Sept. 24. 1S64. 
Must, out Oct. 16, 1S64 ; term exp'd. 
Died August 19, 1864. 
Promoted Qr Master July 25, 1864. 
Trans. & pro. Cpt.Uth C.V. June 18, 
Pro. 1st Lieut. Mch. 2, 1865. [1864. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. March 2, 1665. 



TENTH REGIMENT INFANTRY. 203 

Head-Quarters 10th Infantry Conn. Vols.) 
Before Richmond, Va. Feb. 28th, 1865. ) 

Brig. Gkn. IT. J. Morse, 

Adjutant- General of Connecticut. 
General: — 

I have the honor to report as follows of the movements and opera- 
tions of my regiment for the year ending March 1st, 18G5. 

March 1st, 1864, found the regiment, save the re-enlisted veterans, 
at St. Augustine,. Fla., garrisoning Fort Marion, and doing heavy 
picket and provost duty. Col. Otis commanded both the regiment and 
the military post of St. Augustine. 

The re-enlisted men were under my command in Connecticut on 
furlough. April 14th, I reported with them by order of the War 
Department, to Major Gen. Casey, at Washington, D. C, and thence 
took them into Camp Distribution, Alexandria, Va. April 18th, Col. 
Otis left St. Augustine with the regiment for Hilton Head, thence to 
Fort Monroe and Gloucester Point, Va., going into camp April 25th, 
at the latter place with other troops of the Tenth Army Corps. 
April 26th, I joined him there with the veterans and about thirty-five 
recruits. By order, the camp and garrison equipage of the regiment 
with the regimental and company records and the surplus baggage 
of officers and men were shipped from Gloucester Point, for Fort 
Monroe and Norfolk, to be stored. The vessel transporting them 
went to the bottom and the loss, especially in records, was irreparable 
to the regiment. 

May 4th, we left Gloucester Point, in transports and the following 
day ascended the James, under Major Gen. Butler, landing at Ber- 
muda Hundred during the night of the 4th. On the 5th, we marched 
some five miles into the interior to the Curtis plantation, where the 
column halted and formed a line of occupation. During the night of 
the 6th, notwithstanding the fatigue of the men who had been up two 
nights embarking and disembarking, and were much worn by their 
tramp in the hot sun in heavy marching order after months of inac- 
tion, defe ces were thrown up along the entire front, so that by day- 
light a tolerable protection was secured. On the morning of the 7th, 
we moved out with ouk brigade temporarily attached to a division of 
the Eighteenth Corps, under Brig. Gen. Brooks, towards the Peters- 
burg and Richmond Railroad, above Port Walthall junction. The 
heat of the day was extreme and half a dozen of our men fell smitten 



204 adjutant-general's report. 

by sunstroke, while twice as many more were prostrated by complete 
exhaustion. The railroad was reached and cut after a sharp engage- 
ment and the telegraph line was destroyed for several miles, our reg- 
iment aiding in the work, under fire without losing a man. On the 
afternoon of the 8th, we were sent on picket, remaining on outpost 
until the evening of the 10th, having meantime to meet one or two 
demonstrations of the enemy on the exposed front. On the night of 
the LOth, two thirds of our effective men wen* put at work on the 
Entrenchments, and the remainder were obliged to stand to arms in 
anticipation of attack. Our men had then been op Biz nights out of 
eight, marching, fighting or at work in the trenches, but their >evere 
service was yet only beginning. On the 12th, we moved out a strong 
column to the Richmond turnpike, and thence towards Drurv's Bluff. 
Of that expedition I respectfully refer you to the report of Col. Otis, 
as follows;— (Col. Otis' report dated May 27th, 1864.) 

After the return from Drury's Bluff, we remained four or five 
weeks more at Bermuda Hundred, our men doing heavy fatigue duty 
on the extensive works between the Appomattox and the James, and 
picketing in the face of an active and formidable enemy. A severe 
shelling of our camps was an almost daily occurrence, and sharp 
picket skirmishes were frequent. It is with peculiar satisfaction that 

1 am able to say that during all our stay there, our regiment, although 
often attacked, never yielded any portion of the line assigned to it, 
nor lost a prisoner. 

On the night of June loth, the regiment was picketing at the ex- 
treme right of the line next the James, when the enemy evacuated 
his strong works along the Bermuda Hundred front. In description 
of the part taken by us in the movement following, I beg to call at- 
attention to this extract from my report at this time to the general 

officer of the day. 

******* 

"Early in the night after taking ray position, I became satisfied that 
an increased number of troops were in our immediate front, but no 
unusual indications were manifested until about 10